CPSC & OSHA Fireworks Safety Tips & Some “Things Not to Do” – Be Safe, If Fireworks are Legal in Your State!

CPSC Fireworks Safety

 

New CPSC Data Shows 60% of All Fireworks Injuries Occur Around July 4th; Firecrackers, Aerials, Homemade Explosives Cause Most Deaths, Injuries
June 26, 2013
Release Number: 13-228

fireworks injuries infographicWASHINGTON, D.C. – Today on the grounds of the National Mall, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued its annual report of deaths and injuries involving legal and illegal fireworks for calendar year 2012. Fireworks can have a life-altering impact on consumers, including severe eye injuries, loss of limbs, and even death. CPSC works closely with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP); the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Fireworks, and Explosives; the Department of Transportation; and the Department of Justice to enforce federal safety standards and raise awareness about the dangers of fireworks.

Last year, CPSC received reports of six men who were killed by professional-grade, homemade or banned firework devices. In addition, an estimated 8,700 consumers were treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments for fireworks-related injuries.

Between June 22, 2012 and July 22, 2012, more than 5,000 consumers were treated in hospital emergency rooms due to fireworks-related injuries. Sixty percent of all fireworks injuries occur during the 30 days surrounding the July 4 holiday. More than half of these reported injuries involved burns to the hands, head and face. About 1,000 reported injuries involved sparklers and bottle rockets, fireworks that are frequently and incorrectly considered safe for young children.

Follow-up investigations of incidents showed that most injuries were associated with malfunctioning fireworks or improper use. Malfunctioning fireworks often resulted in unexpected flight paths and dangerous debris. Improper use included igniting fireworks too close to someone, lighting fireworks in one’s hand and playing with lit or used fireworks. Most victims recovered from their injuries or were expected to recover completely; however, several victims reported that their injuries might be long term.

“These figures represent more than numbers; they represent the lives of real people who have been affected well beyond the Fourth of July” said CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum. “The federal government is working hard to keep the public safe by monitoring the ports, the marketplace, and the transportation of fireworks. Now, we need consumers to do their part and celebrate safely.”

Working with CBP, CPSC conducts surveillance on imported fireworks. During 2012, the agencies collected and tested shipments of imported fireworks for compliance with the Federal Hazardous Substance Act (FHSA). About 30 percent of the tested products were found to be in violation of the law and were immediately stopped at the U.S. port. This import surveillance program strives to keep violative and dangerous fireworks off of U.S. store shelves and roadside stands.

“The solid partnership between CBP, CPSC and other agencies at the Import Safety Commercial Targeting and Analysis Center (CTAC) enables greater sharing of information and targeting to ensure the safety of imported fireworks,” said CBP Assistant Commissioner Allen Gina. “Interagency collaboration at the CTAC results in the identification and interdiction of potentially unsafe imported merchandise, including non-compliant fireworks, and truly exemplifies working together as one U.S. Government at the Border to protect American consumers.”

At the national level, CBP, CPSC and the Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) work side-by-side at the CTAC in Washington, DC to effectively combat the importation of illegal fireworks. The CTAC provides a platform for the agencies to share data, analyze import trends and conduct joint risk-based targeting to identify fireworks shipments that pose a safety risk.

“Fireworks are explosives. Protecting the public means making sure that our safety regulations work when these explosives are being transported,” said PHMSA Administrator Cynthia Quarterman.

“As the federal law enforcement agency charged with enforcing federal explosives laws, ATF actively works with other federal agencies, such as CPSC, through its fireworks enforcement program to protect the public from the dangers of illegal explosives devices,” said ATF Acting Director B. Todd Jones.

Consumers who decide to purchase legal fireworks are urged to take these safety steps.

  • Make sure the fireworks you want to buy are legal in your area before buying or using them.
  • Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks, including sparklers. Parents may not realize that young children suffer injuries from sparklers. Sparklers burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees ─ hot enough to melt some metals.
  • Always have an adult closely supervise fireworks activities if older children are allowed to handle devices.
  • Avoid buying fireworks that are packaged in brown paper because this is often a sign that the fireworks were made for professional displays and could pose a danger to consumers.
  • Never place any part of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse. Back up to a safe distance immediately after lighting fireworks.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap.
  • Never try to relight or handle malfunctioning fireworks. Soak them with water and throw them away.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Light fireworks one at a time, then move back quickly.
  • Never carry fireworks in a pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.
  • After fireworks complete their burning, douse the spent device with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before discarding the device to prevent a trash fire.
  • ATF encourages the public to report the manufacture or sale of illegal fireworks to your local law enforcement agencies or to the ATF hotline at 1-888-ATF-BOMB (1-888-283-2662).
OSHA and Fireworks Safety

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration actively urges increased safety awareness in the fireworks industry in advance of the July 4 celebrations via demanding that the fireworks and pyrotechnics industry be vigilant in protecting workers from hazards while manufacturing, storing, transporting, displaying and selling fireworks for public events.

“As we look forward to July 4 celebrations with fireworks and festivities, we must also consider the safety of workers who handle pyrotechnics,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. “Employers are responsible for keeping everyone safe on the job and taking appropriate measures to protect workers from serious injuries or death.”

In March 2012, three workers suffered serious burns caused by an explosion at Global Pyrotechnic Solutions Inc. OSHA cited the Dittmer, Mo., company nearly $117,000 for safety violations relating to explosive hazards.

OSHA’s pyrotechnics directive – with a compliance policy for manufacture, storage, sale, handling, use and display of pyrotechnics – provides inspection guidance and OSHA requirements as they apply to pyrotechnics facilities and operations. The directive is available at http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/Directive_pdf/CPL_02-01-053.pdf.

OSHA’s webpage on the pyrotechnics industry addresses retail sales of fireworks and fireworks displays. Information on common hazards and solutions are found in both areas of the industry, and downloadable safety posters for workplaces are available at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/pyrotechnic/index.html. It also includes a video, available at http://www.osha.gov/video/fireworks/index.html, which demonstrates the best industry practices for retail sales and manufacturers based on National Fire Protection Association consensus standards.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and by providing training, education and assistance.

For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

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