With the Long Hot Spell Across the US Continuing, Be Aware of Heat Stress in Your Employees!

The Dangers of Heat Stress

First Aid Tips: How to Treat Heat Exhaustion

Many workers spend some part of their working day in a hot environment. Workers in foundries, laundries, construction projects, and bakeries — to name a few industries — often face hot conditions which pose special hazards to safety and health. The following references aid in identifying hazards and possible solutions for heat stress in the workplace.

  • OSHA Technical Manual (OTM). OSHA Directive TED 01-00-015 [TED 1-0.15A], (1999, January 20). Identifies heat stress as part of the evaluation process in the following:
  • Heat Stress Card. OSHA Publication 3154, (2002). A Spanish version is also available. Lists symptoms of heat-related illnesses and first aid techniques.
  • Working Outdoors in Warm Climates. OSHA Fact Sheet, (2005, September), 26 KB PDF, 2 pages.
  • Protecting Yourself in the Sun. OSHA Publication 3154, (2003). A Spanish version is also available. Contains suggestions to protect employees from harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation.
  • Protecting Workers in Hot Environments. OSHA Fact Sheet 95-16, (1995). Provides a simple, easy-to-read discussion of heat stress in the workplace.
  • Beating the Heat. OSHA. Contains links to information on avoiding heat stress, protecting against UV radiation, Lyme Disease, and general information.
  • Working in Hot Environments. Department of Health and Humans Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 86-112, (1992). Provides employers and workers with an overview of the health hazards associated with work in hot environments and to alerts them to the precautions that should be taken to prevent injuries and other health problems caused by heat stress.
  • A Guide to Heat Stress in Agriculture. OSHA and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), (1993, May). Offers practical, step-by-step guidance for nontechnical managers on how to set up and operate a heat stress control program.
  • Heat Stress in Construction. Center to Protect Workers’ Rights (CPWR), (1996), 24 KB PDF, 2 pages. A 43 KB PDF (Spanish version) is also available. Instructs workers on how to protect themselves from heat stress.
  • Ramsey, J. D., F. N. Dukes-Dobos, and T. E. Bernard. “Evaluation and control of hot working environments: Part I — Guidelines for the practitioner.” International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 14(1994): 119-127. Provides a review of guidelines for practitioners in the evaluation and control of hot working environments.
  • Ramsey, J. D., F. N. Dukes-Dobos, and T. E. Bernard. “Evaluation and control of hot working environments: Part II — Knowledge base for guide.” International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 14(1994): 129-138. Includes a review of the scientific basis of the guidelines for the evaluation and control of hot working environments.

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