OSHA 300 Log – “Recordable Or Not?”

Employers know they need to keep records of work-related injuries and illnesses, but sometimes figuring out whether a particular case belongs on the OSHA 300 Log can be tricky.

OSHA uses a four-part test to determine recordability. In order for an injury or illness to be considered recordable, the case must meet all four of the following tests:

  1. An injury or illness must have occurred;
  2. The injury or illness must be work-related;
  3. The injury or illness must be a new case; and
  4. The injury or illness must meet the general recording criteria.

But it’s often difficult to determine how these criteria apply to real-world situations. With that in mind, we’ve created an easy-to-use infographic that will guide you through the test, using examples and clear definitions along the way.

A few caveats:

  • Not all employers are required to keep records of work-related injuries and illnesses; some industries are partially exempt. For a list of exemptions, refer to http://tinyurl.com/oqkop3u. Even employers in partially exempt industries must keep records if requested to in writing by OSHA, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), or any state agency operating under the authority of OSHA or the BLS.
  • Employers with 10 or fewer employees for the entirety of the previous calendar year are also partially exempt from the recordkeeping requirements. In addition to full-time employees, temporary, seasonal, and part-time workers must be counted toward the total.
  • All companies, regardless of size or industry exemption, must report any incidents involving the death of a worker or the in-patient hospitalization of three or more workers to OSHA within 8 hours.

Recordable or Not? A Step-by-Step Decision Guide

Recordable or Not? A Step-by-Step Decision Guide by Safety.BLR.com

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