“Have Yourself a Safe, Undistracted, and Accident Free Holiday” #Safety #HolidaySafety #WorkplaceSafety

holiday-safety

Keep your holidays happy and safe. At this time of year, with all of the joy, parties, and excitement the season brings, employers need to be especially vigilant to keep and maintain a safe workplace environment for employees and customers and other third parties. A distracted or inebriated employee may be an employee at risk, which may in-turn bring liability onto the employer.

The holidays are a time to redouble your focus on workplace safety. At this time of year, people can be distracted or tired and may be teaming with people they do not ordinarily work with due to others taking time off. Working with someone new, especially at high-risk jobs, may be a recipe for disaster. It is important to ensure all employees are properly trained and qualified for the tasks they are being asked to perform, especially if a task is not within their normal job activities.

In addition, with all of the joy, parties, and excitement the season brings, employers need to be especially vigilant to keep and maintain a safe workplace for employees, customers, and other third parties. A distracted or inebriated employee may be an employee at risk, which may in-turn, bring liability onto the employer. The holidays are a good time to remind employees of drug and alcohol policies and to be on the lookout for violations of those policies. See Eleventh Circuit Says “NO” to Drunk Driving, and President Declares “National Impaired Driving Prevention Month”.

The holidays are also a time when your employees may be at risk for workplace violence, both from within the company and from third parties. Many employees will be excited about the time spent with friends and family, but many others may not have those opportunities. Be aware of the signs of a distressed and potentially violent employee. See for instance, Wave of Shootings Puts Workplace Violence Back in the Spotlight, and NIOSH Offers Free Training Program to Help Employers Address Safety Risks Faced by Home Healthcare Workers. We have also blogged about workplace safety risks from shoppers and third-parties. See Holiday Shopping and Crowd Management Safety Guidelines for Retailers,

In addition be on the lookout for other holiday workplace liability issues, especially at company holiday parties. For instance, in Don’t Let Too Much Eggnog Ruin Your Office Holiday Party: Tips to Limit Employer Liability at Company Parties, we suggested that employers consider these tips to minimize your organization’s exposure to legal liability and, more importantly, prevent an undesirable incident from occurring at your office holiday party:

  • Prior to the party, circulate a memo to reiterate your company’s policy against sexual and other forms of harassment. Remind employees in the memo that the policy applies to their conduct at company parties and other social events, and they should act in a professional manner at all times.
  • Set a tone of moderation by reminding employees of the company’s policy against the abuse of alcohol and zero tolerance with respect to the possession, use, or sale of illegal drugs.
  • Ensure your dress code prohibits any form of revealing or provocative attire, and remind employees that the policy applies at company-sponsored events.
  • If appropriate, allow employees to invite a spouse or their children to the party. Many employees might think twice about their actions if spouses and/or children are present.
  • Consider limiting the number of alcoholic drinks or the time during which alcohol will be served. In either case, stop serving alcohol well before the party ends.
  • Serve food at the party so employees are not consuming alcohol on an empty stomach and make sure there are plenty of non-alcoholic alternatives available.
  • Host the party at a restaurant or hire a caterer. Remind bartenders that they are not permitted to serve anyone who appears to be impaired or intoxicated and to notify a particular company representative if anyone appears to be impaired.
  • Remind managers to set a professional example, and designate several managers to be on the lookout for anyone who appears to be impaired or intoxicated.
  • Anticipate the need for alternative transportation and don’t allow employees who have been drinking heavily to drive home. If an employee appears to be heavily intoxicated, have a manager drive the employee home or ride with the employee in a cab to ensure he/she gets home safely.
  • Check your insurance policies to ensure they cover the company adequately, including any accidents or injuries that arise out of a company party or event.
  • Promptly investigate any complaints that are made after the party, and take any necessary remedial action for conduct that violates company policy.

Employers with questions or concerns about any of these issues or topics are encouraged to reach out to the authors, your Seyfarth attorney, or any member of the Workplace Safety and Health (OSHA/MSHA) Team or the Workplace Counseling & Solutions Team.

Source: Seyfarth Shaw, LLP

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