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“Everything You Should Know About Safety Boots Standards – Infographic”#PPE #Safety

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Safety Boots Standard – How safe is Your Boot?

Ever heard of the safety boots standard? Like many other people, your likely answer is “NO.” Chances are you were attracted to the footwear because it claimed to offer the best safety, is common with other workers, or you needed to upgrade to a better type. You probably didn’t spend time looking at it, the design, the markings, signs or label.

While these may look like basic or unimportant issues, they will determine how safe you will be while at the site. Yes, the boot will be well-built and features a heavy-duty sole for firm-grip even in wet and oily surfaces; however, it won’t protect you from electricity shock. A boot will resist electrical currents but won’t withstand sharp spikes, rugged edges or heavy debris. You can know whether your work boots suited for the task at hand by looking at the signs, markings and label found on the footwear.

Briefly  Looking at Markings and Signs 

Orange Omega Safety Sign: This sign indicates that the boot meets the minimal standards in regard to electrical charges. It will come with a sole that is resistant to electrical and static charges and will protect your feet / body from shock or electrocution.

Green Triangle: This shows the boot consists of a grade 1 sole and class 1 toe cap. The sturdy-sole is tolerant to punctures, rugged edges, sharp points, prolonged impact not exceeding 125 joules, and heavy falling object. The toe cap will protect the toes against impact from hitting obstacles or falling debris. It is less-susceptible to wear & tear compared to other classes and is designed for workers in heavy industries and construction.

Yellow Triangle: Boots featuring this marking come with a grade 2 sole and class 2 toe cap. Just like the green triangle, this boot’s sole is resistant to punctures and protects the toes and feet from impact not exceeding 90 joules. Nonetheless, they are not as sturdy or heavy-duty as boots with the Green Triangle and are best suited for light industries.

Blue Square: This indicates the boot comes with a grade 1 toe cap for protecting the user’s toes and feet from impact of up to 125 joules. However, the sole is not puncture-resistant and may be punctured by sharp objects, sharp edges, or rugged terrains.

Yellow Square plus Greed SD Letters: The boot is approved for use in areas that experience electrostatic charges. The anti-static sole not only protects the wearer from electrical charges but also safely dissipates static.

Grey Background Bearing Black Letter R in a Circle: The shoe features a grade 2 toe protection that can withstand impacts up to 90 joules. It however doesn’t come with a puncture-resistant sole and is therefore fit for non-industrial work.

Red Square with Grounding Symbol and Black-colored Letter C: This boot is fit for environments with low electrical charges. It features an electrically-conductive sole for absorbing mild charges. Unfortunately, it is not deigned for areas with high electrical charges.

White Background with Green Fir Tree: The green fir depicts the forest hence is suitable for wearing in forested areas. The boot is ideal for people using cutting equipment such as chainsaws in the forest or working on lumber. It will protect your feet from splinters, needles/pricks, sharp leaves and other falling and flying debris.

Final Thoughts

There you go- common signs and markings that depict how safe and suitable your safety boot is. Before investing in any product, you need to first match the boot to the need at hand. Check out this beautiful infograph to learn more about safety boots standards and related issues.

Source: About Boots

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“CSB Releases New Safety Video Detailing Investigation into 2013 Fatal Fire and Explosion at the Williams Olefins Plant in Geismar, LA”

January 25, 2017, Washington, DC –

Today the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) released a safety video of its investigation of the June 13, 2013 explosion and fire at the Williams Olefins Plant in Geismar, Louisiana, which killed two workers and injured an additional 167.  The deadly explosion and fire occurred when a heat exchanger containing flammable liquid propane violently ruptured.

The CSB’s newly released 12-minute safety video entitled, “Blocked In,” includes a 3D animation of the explosion and fire as well as interviews with CSB investigator Lauren Grim and Chairperson Vanessa Allen Sutherland. The video is based on the CSB’s case study on the Williams incident and can be viewed on the CSB’s website and YouTube.

Chairperson Sutherland said, “Our investigation on the explosion at Williams describes an ineffective process safety management program at the plant at the time of the incident. We urge other companies to incorporate our recommendations at their facilities and to assess the state of their cultures to promote safety at all organizational levels to prevent a similar accident. ”

The CSB’s investigation found many process safety management program deficiencies at Williams, which set the stage for the incident. In particular, the CSB found that the heat exchanger that failed was completely isolated from its pressure relief valve.

In the video, Investigator Lauren Grim said, “When evaluating overpressure protection requirements for heat exchangers, engineers must think about how to manage potential scenarios, including unintentional hazards. In this case, simply having a pressure relief valve available could have prevented the explosion.”

The CSB investigation concluded that in the twelve years leading to the incident, a series of process safety management program deficiencies caused the heat exchanger to be unprotected from overpressure.  As revealed in the investigation, during that time Management of Change Reviews, Pre-Startup Safety Reviews, and Process Hazard Analyses all failed to effectively identify and control the hazard.

In addition, the CSB found that Williams failed to develop a written procedure for activities performed on the day of the incident, nor did the company have a routine maintenance schedule to prevent the operational heat exchanger from needing to be shut down for cleaning.

Finally, the video describes CSB’s recommendations made to the Williams Geismar plant which  encourages similar companies to review and incorporate into their own facilities. These include:

– Conduct safety culture assessments that involve workforce participation, and communicate the results in reports that recommend specific actions to address safety culture weaknesses

– Develop a robust safety indicators tracking program that uses the data identified to drive continual safety improvement

– And perform comprehensive process safety program assessments to thoroughly evaluate the effectiveness of the facility’s process safety programs.

“Managers must implement and then monitor safety programs and encourage a strong culture of safety to protect workers and the environment,” Chairperson Vanessa Allen Sutherland said,

The CSB is an independent federal agency charged with investigating serious chemical accidents. CSB investigations examine all aspects of chemical accidents, including physical causes such as equipment failure as well as inadequacies in regulations, industry standards, and safety management systems.

The Board does not issue citations or fines but makes safety recommendations to companies, industry organizations, labor groups, and regulatory agencies such as OSHA and EPA. Please visit our website, http://www.csb.gov.

For more information, contact Communications Manager Hillary Cohen at public@csb.gov or by phone at 202.446.8095.

 

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