“OSHA National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls In Construction – May 8-12, 2017” #StandDown4Safety

Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees, accounting for 350 of the 937 construction fatalities recorded in 2015 (BLS data). Those deaths were preventable. The National Fall Prevention Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries.


What is a Safety Stand-Down?

A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on “Fall Hazards” and reinforcing the importance of “Fall Prevention”. It’s an opportunity for employers to have a conversation with employees about hazards, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals. It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall hazards they see.

Who Can Participate?

Anyone who wants to prevent falls in the workplace can participate in the Stand-Down. In past years, participants included commercial construction companies of all sizes, residential construction contractors, sub- and independent contractors, highway construction companies, general industry employers, the U.S. Military, other government participants, unions, employer’s trade associations, institutes, employee interest organizations, and safety equipment manufacturers.

Partners

OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

How to Conduct a Safety Stand-Down and FAQ’s

Companies can conduct a Safety Stand-Down by taking a break to have a toolbox talk or another safety activity such as conducting safety equipment inspections, developing rescue plans, or discussing job specific hazards. Managers are encouraged to plan a stand-down that works best for their workplace anytime during the May 8-12, 2017. SeeSuggestions to Prepare for a Successful “Stand-Down” and Highlights from the Past Stand-Downs. OSHA also hosts an Events page with events that are free and open to the public to help employers and employees find events in your area.

Certificate of Participation

Employers will be able to provide feedback about their Stand-Down and download a Certificate of Participation following the Stand-Down.

Share Your Story With Us

If you want to share information with OSHA on your Safety Stand-Down, Fall Prevention Programs or suggestions on how we can improve future initiatives like this, please send your email to oshastanddown@dol.gov. Also share your Stand-Down story on social media, with the hashtag: #StandDown4Safety.

If you plan to host a free event that is open to the public, see OSHA’s Events page to submit the event details and to contact your Regional Stand-Down Coordinator.

Additional Resources:

OSHA’s Falls Prevention Campaign Page (en español)

Fall Prevention Training Guide – A Lesson Plan for Employers (PDF) (EPUB | MOBI). Spanish (PDF) (EPUB | MOBI).

Fall Prevention Publications Webpage contains fall prevention materials in English and Spanish.

Ladder Safety Guidance

Scaffolding

  • Ladder Jack Scaffolds Fact Sheet (PDF)
  • Narrow Frame Scaffolds Fact Sheet (HTML PDF)
  • Tube and Coupler Scaffolds – Erection and Use Fact Sheet (PDF)
  • Tube and Coupler Scaffolds – Planning and Design Fact Sheet (PDF)
  • Scaffolding Booklet (HTML PDF)
  • OSHA Scaffold eTool
Stand-Down Partner Materials

Outreach Training Materials

Fall Safety Videos

Additional Educational Materials

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“BLS: On-The-Job Deaths At Highest Level Since 2008″​

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A total of 4,836 deaths due to workplace injuries occurred in 2015 – a 0.3 percent increase over 2014 and the most since 5,214 workers died in 2008, according to data released Dec. 16t, 2016 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Other highlights from the 2015 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries:

  • The 903 deaths among Hispanic or Latino workers and 495 deaths among African-American workers were the most since 2007 and 2008, respectively.
  • 650 deaths occurred among workers age 65 and older – the second-highest total among this demographic since the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries began in 1992.
  • Roadway incident fatalities climbed 9 percent to 1,264, accounting for 26 percent of all fatal work-related injuries in 2015.
  • The private construction industry recorded 937 deaths, the highest total since 975 in 2008.
  • Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers experienced 745 fatal injuries, the most of any occupation.
  • Fatal injuries among private oil and gas extraction workers were 38 percent lower in 2015 than 2014.
  • The states with the highest number of worker deaths were Texas with 527, followed by California with 388, Florida with 272 and New York with 236.

Although the overall rate of fatal workplace injuries fell to 3.38 per 100,000 in 2015 from 3.43 per 100,000 in 2014, the rise in the number of fatalities alarmed officials.

“These numbers underscore the urgent need for employers to provide a safe workplace for their employees as the law requires,” Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez said in a press release. “We have a moral responsibility to make sure that workers who showed up to work today are still alive to punch the clock tomorrow.”

Meanwhile, AFL-CIO Director of Safety and Health Peg Seminario sounded a warning for the future. “The bottom line is that working people in this country need more safety and health protection – not less,” Seminario said in a statement. “The new administration’s actions on worker safety will be an important measure of whether they are keeping their campaign promises to improve the lives of workers.”

My take on this: If only companies and others would look at their own safety program or investigate how a proactive, hands on,”on the floor”, employee mentoring, workplace safety professional (Like I am and have done) can not only build a great safety culture, but also save them 100K to 500K or more per year in cost savings from WC to PPE and Company Insurance coverage. Then, these overall negative numbers and exposure would be much lower. 

We’ll just have to see if the regulations cutback does happen and to what degree and adapt if necessary. There’s always a way to get the job done and improve safety at any workplace. – Jack Benton, CDS

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