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“VIDEO: Bad Train Car Axle Likely To Blame For Explosive 2013 Derailment In ND, Final NTSB Report Says”

ntsb

CASSELTON, N.D. — In releasing a long-awaited investigation report, the National Transportation Safety Board said a defective axle that broke was the likely cause of a fiery 2013 collision between an oil train and a derailed grain train just outside Casselton.

At an NTSB meeting Tuesday, Feb. 7, in Washington, D.C., crash investigators said the axle had an empty space in the center of it that should have been solid.

NTSB investigators learned that a Pennsylvania company, Standard Steel, made the flawed axle in 2002, among a total of 48 axles manufactured under similar conditions, investigator Michael Hiller said. Thirty-five of those axles, which may have similar defects, are not accounted for, he said.

“We can only assume that the axles have been removed from service due to life cycle, due to other accidents,” he said.

Hiller said 10 of the axles were found and taken out of service. It was discovered that two others were involved in separate accidents in 2010 in Nebraska, he said. No one was hurt in the two accidents, which were derailments that involved broken axles, according to Federal Railroad Administration records.

The Casselton collision between two BNSF trains happened on the afternoon of Dec. 30, 2013. It forced about 1,500 residents to evacuate their homes. No one was seriously injured.

Shortly afterward, NTSB investigators began focusing on the broken axle, which was on a derailed grain car. They found that the axle’s bearings and wheels were remounted by BNSF in 2010 and that more thorough testing of the axle would have caught the flaw.

The Association of American Railroads began requiring such testing of secondhand axles following an NTSB recommendation in April 2014, Hiller said. BNSF spokeswoman Amy McBeth said this sort of testing wasn’t standard practice in 2010.

The crash, which triggered massive explosions and received national media attention, highlighted the dangers of moving crude oil by rail. The tank cars involved were DOT-111s, which Congress has since required to eventually be replaced by more rugged DOT-117s that are believed to be safer.

“Yet the deadlines for replacing variants of the DOT-111 tank car, for carriage of various flammable liquids, fall along a timeline that extends from 2018 to 2029, leaving Americans at heightened risk for years to come,” said NTSB Chairman Christopher Hart. “While few DOT-111 tank cars remain in crude oil service, a vast fleet of these less safe tank cars continues in service for ethanol and other flammable liquids.”

McBeth said that since 2011, BNSF has “advocated for a new, stronger tank car standard and has worked with our customers to get safer tank cars into service sooner.”

The NTSB investigation found that after 13 cars from the westbound grain train derailed, the train’s emergency brakes were applied. At that point, the eastbound oil train was 18 seconds away, traveling at 42 mph. The oil train was likely moving at about that speed when it hit the grain car lying across the track, the NTSB said.

Twenty oil cars derailed, and 18 of those spilled more than 476,000 gallons of oil, fueling a fire that engulfed intact cars and caused them to explode, the NTSB said.

During Tuesday’s meeting, the NTSB showed a video of the crash, including the frantic radio traffic of an oil train crew member. “We are on fire,” he told a train dispatcher. “We are derailed. We are all over. We got to go.”

The front door of the oil train’s lead locomotive was damaged, so the two crew members narrowly escaped through a rear door shortly before the locomotive was engulfed in flames, the NTSB said.

Between the two lead locomotives of the oil train and the 104 tank cars was what’s called a buffer car that’s meant to protect the train crew from hazardous materials. In its investigation report, the NTSB recommended a study of whether more buffer cars should be required.

NTSB spokesman Eric Weiss has said the three-year-plus investigation into the crash took longer than usual because the agency used it as a vehicle to examine train safety features, such as advanced braking systems. Such braking systems, which can reduce stopping distance, would not have prevented the crash because only a few seconds passed between the time the oil train crew saw the derailed grain car and the moment of impact, Hart said.

The oil train engineer and conductor both sued BNSF after the crash. The conductor reached a confidential settlement with the railroad in July, and the engineer’s suit, which also targeted Standard Steel, is still pending.

Phone messages left for Standard Steel representatives were not returned Tuesday.

Source: AGWEEK 

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“ANSI Emergency Eyewash, Shower Standard Revised – Are You In Compliance?”

By Roy Maurer  12/7/2015

The national consensus standard for the selection, installation and maintenance of emergency eye, face and shower equipment was recently updated.

The International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA) received American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approval for ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2014, American National Standard for Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment, and the update went into effect January 2015.

There is no grandfather clause, and existing equipment must be compliant with the revised standard.

“This globally accepted standard continues to be the authoritative document that specifies minimum performance criteria for flow rates, temperature and drenching patterns,” said Imants Stiebris, chairman of the ISEA Emergency Eyewash and Shower Group and safety products business leader at Speakman Co.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has a general requirement specifying where and when emergency eyewash and shower equipment must be available, but it does not specify operating or installation requirements.

That’s where the ANSI/ISEA standard comes in. While it doesn’t have the full force of an OSHA regulation, the standard helps employers meet OSHA requirements.

“Safety showers and eyewashes are your first line of defense should there be an accident,” said Casey Hayes, director of operations for Haws Integrated, a firm that designs, builds and manages custom-engineered industrial water safety systems. “We’ve seen OSHA stepping up enforcement of the standard in the last couple of years and issuing more citations,” he said.

What Is ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2014?

The standard covers plumbed and self-contained emergency showers and emergency eyewash equipment, eye/face wash equipment, combination units, personal wash units and hand-held drench hoses. These systems are typically found in manufacturing facilities, construction sites, laboratories, medical offices and other workplaces.

The standard specifies minimum performance criteria for flow rates, temperature and drenching patterns for a user to adequately rinse off a contaminant in an emergency situation. It also provides maintenance directives to ensure that the equipment is in proper working condition.

One of the most significant requirements of the standard deals with the location of the equipment, Hayes said, and “It’s probably the most difficult part for employers to comply with.” The equipment must be accessible to workers within 10 seconds—a vague requirement, according to Hayes—but the standard’s appendix references 55 feet, he pointed out.

The wash or shower must be located on the same level as the hazard. “You can’t have somebody working on a stairwell and have to go up or down a flight to get to the shower. The equipment needs to be installed on the same level where the accident could happen,” he said.

The wash station must also be free of obstructions. “Someone needing to get to the shower or eyewash could be in a panic—their eyes could be blinded by chemicals—so employers must ensure that the shower is accessible and free of obstructions,” he said.

All equipment must be identified with highly visible signage, must be well-lit, and needs to be able to go from “off” to “on” in one second or less.

“The volume of water that is required for a 15-minute flow is not always considered,” Hayes said. The standard requires the victim to endure a flushing flow for a minimum of 15 minutes. With water pressure from the drench shower 10 times the amount of a typical residential shower, “that is a significant amount of water, and you need to deal with it on the floor and from a capacity standpoint,” he said.

The comfort of the person using the wash also needs to be considered. “It is not a pleasant experience to put your eyes in the path of water. The controlled flow of flushing fluid must be at a velocity low enough to be noninjurious to the user,” Hayes said.

The standard stipulates minimum flow rates of:

  • 0.4 gallons per minute for eyewashes.
  • 3 gallons per minute for eye/face washes. A good eye/face wash will have separate dedicated flows of water for your eyes and face, Hayes said.
  • 20 gallons per minute for showers. That’s 300 gallons of water required for the 15-minute wash.

Washes must deliver tepid water defined as between 60 degrees and 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Studies have shown that tepid water increases the chances that a victim can tolerate the required 15-minute wash. Tepid water also encourages the removal of contaminated clothing, which acts as a barrier to the flushing fluid.

“We’re also seeing employers putting showers in enclosed areas or in curtained areas, to promote the removal of clothing and alleviate workers’ privacy concerns,” Hayes said.

2014 Revisions to the Standard

There weren’t that many changes to the 2009 standard, but a few highlights include the following:

  • A requirement was included that emergency showers be designed, manufactured and installed in such a way that, once activated, they can be operated without the use of hands.
  • The way the height of eyewashes and eye/face washes are measured changed from the floor to the wash basin to from the floor to the water flow. The height should still be between 33 inches and 53 inches. “Something to consider when inspecting washes is to ensure that, even though your wash fits within these limits, it’s still realistically usable,” Hayes said.
  • A single step up into an enclosure where the wash is accessed is not considered an obstruction. This had not been addressed previously.

The 2014 version further clarifies that fluid flow location and pattern delivery for emergency eyewashes and eye/face washes is the critical aspect in designing and installing these devices, rather than the positioning of nozzles. Additionally, illustrations have been updated to reflect contemporary design configurations.

Best Practices

Hayes recommended a few best practices that go above and beyond the standard and that he has seen used at companies with strong safety cultures:

  • Locate washes and showers in areas with adequate space for emergency responders to fulfill their duties. “If the equipment is in a tight space, you’re preventing responders from helping victims,” he said. Enclosures can be built to allow multiple people to be inside.
  • Monitor and evaluate all accessible components of washes and showers on a frequent and routine basis to manage potential problems.
  • Use eye/face washes in lieu of simply eyewashes. “It’s highly unlikely that a chemical splash will only land on your eye surface. This is common sense, so put in the right equipment,” he said.
  • Check that the washes meet the proper gauge height. The standard’s weekly activation requirement is mainly to ensure that water is available and to clear sediment buildup. “While a quick activation might seem sufficient, it’s not an accurate representation of functionality for the required 15-minute flush,” Hayes said. “If water is there but doesn’t rise up to the proper gauge height, you are compliant, but that equipment may fail you in the event that it’s needed.”

The ISEA’s new Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment Selection, Installation and Use Guide is a document that provides assistance on the proper selection, use and maintenance of equipment. The 22-page guide includes a frequently asked questions section and an annual inspection checklist.

The guide is available for download in PDF format.

Roy Maurer is an online editor/manager for SHRM.

Follow him @SHRMRoy

– See more at: http://www.shrm.org/hrdisciplines/safetysecurity/articles/pages/emergency-eyewash-standard-revised.aspx#sthash.LEfV88ib.dpuf

“What Do You Really Need In Your First Aid Kit?”

First Aid Cabinet

First Aid Cabinet

When it comes to first-aid kits, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is not a micro-manager.

The agency doesn’t tell you what supplies to include in your kit or even how many kits you should have. OSHA only says at 29 CFR 1910.151(b), that “adequate first-aid supplies shall be readily available.”

OSHA, in a 2007 letter of interpretation (LOI), tells you that “If the employer has persons who are trained in first aid, then adequate first-aid supplies must be readily available for use.”

What does OSHA mean by “adequate” supplies? The LOI went on to explain that “employers are required to provide first-aid supplies that are most appropriate to respond to incidents at their workplaces.” The most appropriate supplies can be different for each work-site.

Which begs the question, what does “most appropriate” mean?

Review your OSHA logs and reports

To determine the supplies and the amounts that are “most appropriate” for your workplace, you can review your OSHA 300 logs of injuries and Illnesses and your 301 incident reports. You can also seek the advice of your medical professional, or you can consult the local fire and rescue service or emergency medical services.

Appendix A to §1910.151 refers employers to the American National Standard (ANSI) Z308.1-1998 “Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits,” saying the contents of the kit listed in the ANSI standard should be adequate for small worksites. For larger operations or multiple operations, employers should determine the need for additional kits, additional types of first-aid equipment and supplies, and additional quantities and types of supplies and equipment in the kits.

When stocking your kit, keep in mind the number of employees who may use the kit, and make sure it is easy to access.

While OSHA does not prohibit employers from locking up first-aid supplies, a lock cannot keep the first aid supplies from being “readily available.” Because a lock may limit accessibility in an emergency situation, employers who secure first-aid supplies need to train employees on how to access those supplies, and must ensure that someone is always available to provide access to the supplies.

First-aid kits might not be enough

It some cases, first-aid kits aren’t enough to meet OSHA’s requirement to provide medical supplies that match the hazards of the workplace. For instance, OSHA’s standards for logging operations, permit-required confined spaces, and electric power generation, transmission, and distribution require training in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for certain employees.

In addition, §1910.151(c) requires you to provide “suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body” when employees may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials.

Some state-plan states may have slightly different or more stringent requirements than those of federal OSHA. In California, CalOSHA requires that a physician approves the contents of workplace first-aid kits. If you are in a state-plan state, be sure to check your state’s requirements.

OSHA also refers to ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2014 as an additional, but not a mandatory guide for First Aid Kits and types as noted  in the link here: https://is.gd/m2zBGf

 

 

“Regulated Industry Successfully Challenges New OSHA Process Safety Management Enforcement Policies”

On September 23, 2016, the D.C. Court of Appeals ruled that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) wrongfully adopted new safety requirements for fertilizer dealers who have to comply with the Process Safety Management Standard. Specifically, OSHA improperly issued a memorandum redefining the “retail facility” exemption and did not allow fertilizer dealers to comment on the new rules.

OSHA has promulgated a Process Safety Management (PSM) standard that implements certain requirements for employers to protect the safety of those who work with or near highly hazardous chemicals, and help prevent unexpected releases of such chemicals. Traditionally, retail establishments do not have to comply with the PSM standard because hazardous chemicals are present only in small volumes in such instances.

Following a 2013 explosion at a West Texas Fertilizer facility (videos above) that left 15 people dead after a large amount of ammonium nitrate caught fire, OSHA issued an enforcement memorandum expanding the scope of the PSM standard to cover more retail establishments, including agricultural dealers who sell anhydrous ammonia to farmers. Yet OSHA did this without requesting comments from the public or industry.

Working with legal counsel, the Agricultural Retailers Association (ARA) and The Fertilizer Institute organized a successful lawsuit challenging the new rule. The D.C. Court of Appeals ruled that OSHA violated the Occupational Safety and Health Act when it issued the enforcement memorandum, finding that OSHA had engaged in rulemaking, and was thus bound to solicit comments from the public and industry. As a result of the successful lawsuit, ag retailers do not have to comply with the PSM standard until OSHA receives comments from the public and industry regarding the proposed changes to the PSM standard, which could take several years to finalize.

Commenting on the decision, Harold Cooper, chairman of the ARA, said that “[a]s an industry, ag retailers tend to be complacent about regulations that come our way. We keep our heads down and do what’s required,” he said. “But this rule would have limited farmers’ and retailers’ options through an agency’s improper regulatory overreach. Thankfully, ARA was uniquely prepared and positioned to defend our industry. They gave us a vehicle to fight and win this battle.”

The court’s ruling will make it more difficult in the future for OSHA to issue de facto standards without undertaking proper rulemaking procedures and soliciting comments from the public. Companies should proactively work with skilled legal counsel who can assist on rulemaking processes that impact workplace health and safety.

Source: 9/27/2016 by Daniel BirnbaumMichael Taylor  | BakerHostetler

 

 

 

 

 

“National Preparedness Month 2016” – “Are You Ready?” #NatPrep

Don't Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.  

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

National Preparedness Month

September is recognized as National Preparedness Month (NPM) which serves as a reminder that we all must take action to prepare, now and throughout the year, for the types of emergencies that could affect us where we live, work, and also where we visit. Due to the success of last year’s theme, “Don’t Wait, Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today,” will be returning for this September with a continuing emphasis on preparedness for youth, older adults, and people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs.  Thank you for taking time help make America more prepared for emergencies.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHow To Use This Toolkit

The National Preparedness Month Social Media Toolkit has key marketing and preparedness messaging you can print or share on your social media channels to spread the word to colleagues, family and friends throughout the month of September and beyond! You can either copy these messages directly or customize them to reach your audience.

This section is Expanded. Click to Collapse2016 Weekly Themes

  • Promote NPM:  August 28-September 3                  Kickoff to National Preparedness Month
  • Week 2:  September 4-10                                            Preparing Family & Friends
  • Week 3:  September 11-17                                          Preparing Through Service
  • Week 4:  September 18-24                                          Individual Preparedness
  • Week 5:  September 25-30                                          Lead up to National PrepareAthon Day

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHashtags & Emoji’s

  • #NatlPrep
  • #YouthPrep
  • #PrepareAthon if you are conducting a preparedness exercise, tabletop discussion, or sharing a preparedness-in-action moment.
  • Feel free to add emoji’s (the little pictures on your mobile phone keyboard) to your social messages.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseGraphics, Logo, Videos, & Related Links

Check out tips and ideas to promote preparedness content. For more engaging content, attach graphics that are sized appropriately for specific social media posts (i.e. Twitter & Facebook).

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePromote NPM: August 28-September 3| Kickoff To National Preparedness Month

Social Media Content

This content can be used on various social media channels, and is less than 140 characters.

  • #NatlPrep Month starts 9/1. Promote the theme “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” Tools: www.ready.gov/september
  • National Preparedness Month starts September 1! Follow #NatlPrep for tips. More info: www.ready.gov/september
  • “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” Get started here: www.ready.gov/make-a-plan #NatlPrep
  • National Preparedness Month has a different theme every week. Details: www.ready.gov/september #NatlPrep
  • Share your plans for National Preparedness Month using the hashtag #NatlPrep
  • Get ready to go from awareness to action during National Preparedness Month. #NatlPrep
  • RT This: “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” #NatlPrep
  • Creating your Family Emergency Communication Plan starts with one simple question “What if?” 1.usa.gov/1JwEwRG #NatlPrep
  • Does your family know what to do during a disaster? Start a plan today. #NatlPrep
  • You may not be with family when an emergency happens.  Create an emergency plan now: 1.usa.gov/1JwEwRG #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 2- September 4-10| Preparing Family & Friends

During this week you will know how to:

  • Contact family and friends before, during, and after an emergency.
  • Make a family emergency communication plan
  • Consider that your entire family may not be together during a disaster- make a plan of how you will reunite after an emergency.
  • Prepare for the unique needs of your family members, friends and neighbors.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

View in FEMA Multimedia Library

Social Media Content

Family Emergency Communication Plan

  • First week of #NatlPrep month is about getting all generations prepared. Anyone aged 2-102 should be ready for disasters!
  • Check out these tools to start your family emergency plan today: www.ready.gov/kids/make-a-plan #NatlPrep
  • Preparing the family for an emergency is as simple as a convo over dinner. Get started with tips fromwww.ready.gov #NatlPrep
  • What’s in your wallet? Part of our family emergency communication plan can be. Get the pocket-sized version: 1.usa.gov/1LPuV9o #NatlPrep
  • Tip: Keep important numbers written down in your wallet, not just on your phone: 1.usa.gov/1LPuV9o #NatlPrep
  • Take part in #PrepareAthon Day on 9/30 by participating in a preparedness discussion or training: 1.usa.gov/1S6oT4U #NatlPrep
  • Complete the actions in this #preparedness puzzle, you’ll be 10 steps closer to being prepared for an emergency: bit.ly/22tNNpV #NatlPrep
  • Download a group texting app so the entire family can keep in touch before, during & after an emergency. #NatlPrep

Youth Preparedness

  • Sending the kids off to school? Make sure they know what to do in case of an emergency. www.Ready.gov/kids#NatlPrep
  • Include your pet in your emergency preparedness plans. Info: www.ready.gov/pets #NatlPrep
  • Nearly 70M children are in school/childcare each workday. Make a family plan to know how to reunite during an emergency #NatlPrep
  • Kids bored? We can help. Check out our online Ready Kids build a kit game: http://go.usa.gov/5hS5 #NatlPrep
  • Ask your child’s school for a copy of their emergency plan for you to keep at home or work #NatlPrep
  • Fill out emergency contact numbers with your kids before they go #BackToSchool #NatlPrep

Caregivers/Older Adults

  • Caregivers, get all the resources you need in case of an emergency. Check out ready.gov for tips. #NatlPrep
  • Dads at work, Gram’s with friends, kids are at school when disaster strikes. How will you get in touch? Don’t Wait. Communicate. #NatlPrep
  • Make sure parents and grandparents know how to text/post messages for emergencies. #NatlPrep
  • Make sure your parents/grandparents have a *secure* digital copy of their insurance info. #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 3:  September 11-17|Preparing Through Service

During this week you will know how to:

  • Understand the importance of community preparedness.
  • Get involved with your community organization or plan with neighbors.
  • Highlight local preparedness efforts in your community.
  • Celebrate first responders.
  • Celebrate emergency-focused organizations who serve communities.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

National Day of Service & Remembrance

  • I will [fill in your service project] What will you do for your community on this National Day of Service & Remembrance? Tell us using #911Day
  • Do at least 1 good deed for your community on 9/11: http://bit.ly/29DymSw  #911Day
  • Thousands of people all around the nation will commit to a day of service on September 11. Be a part of it and share your experience! Using #911Day
  • How will you give back on National Day of Service & Remembrance? Snap It. Tag It. Post It. #911Day

Volunteer with an Organization

Help Your Community Get Prepared

  • Give a shout out to first responders and community service organizations that have made a difference in your community! #NatlPrep
  • Looking for an opportunity to serve your community? Start with steps found on @ServeDotGovhttp://bit.ly/2a3FAEr #NatlPrep
  • Emergency preparedness is a “whole community” effort. Get involved in your community today:http://bit.ly/2a3FAEr #NatlPrep
  • Your neighbor may have to rely on you during an emergency. Will you be ready:  http://bit.ly/29S1giS  #NatlPrep
  • #PrepareAthon can help your community discover activities to keep you and your neighbors safe:www.ready.gov/prepare  #NatlPrep
  • Visit our map to find resources & info on preparedness in your community:http://www.ready.gov/america/local/index.html #NatlPrep
  • At your next home owners association meeting share this community preparedness resource: http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Your neighbor may need you when an emergency hits. Plan with your neighbor today. http://1.usa.gov/1WVsAy7#NatlPrep
  • “Community preparedness is a shared responsibility.” Share this resource with your community:http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Did you know? FEMA has online trainings to help get your community prepared. Take them today:http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Almost half of Americans expect to rely on their neighbors after a disaster. Plan today: http://1.usa.gov/1QmIZGG#NatlPrep
  • We can’t do it without YOU! Increase your community’s preparedness by joining #PrepareAthonwww.ready.gov/prepare #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 4:  September 18-24| Individual Preparedness

During this week you will know how to:

  • Understand actions you can take to be prepared for emergency
  • Be aware of specific needs you may have if an emergency strikes like: medication, power needs, eye classes, devices that you may count on, pet needs, etc.
  • Understand safety tips and protective actions you can take before or during a disaster.
  • Download the FEMA app for disaster resources, weather alerts, and safety tips

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

General

  • Be informed, make a plan, build a kit, get involved. Everyone can take steps to prepare for an emergency:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcnCQ_pdVCY #NatlPrep
  • Make disaster preparedness a part of your everyday routine and protect yourself and your loved ones:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcnCQ_pdVCY #NatlPrep
  • Being prepared is part of who you are, and disaster preparation is no different: www.ready.gov/myplan #NatlPrep
  • Take meds? Plan ahead by keeping a copy of your Rx + 1 week supply in a safe place. #NatlPrep
  • Keep a radio & extra batteries handy to listen for info from local officials if you lose power. #NatlPrep
  • Gather your supplies before a hurricane so you won’t find yourself with empty shelves. Supply list:www.ready.gov/kit. #NatlPrep
  • If you rely on public transportation, contact your local emergency management agency about evac info ahead of a hurricane. #NatlPrep
  • Sign up to receive text or e-mail alerts about emergencies like wildfire from your local Office of Emergency Management. #NatlPrep
  • Are you getting your community prepared for a #tornado #hurricane or #wildfire? Add your activity:www.ready.gov/prepare  #NatlPrep
  • Wireless Emergency Alerts can save lives! Be smart. Know your alerts and warnings. Learn more: 1.usa.gov/1jLKAGr #NatlPrep
  • Make sure you know what your insurance policy covers before an emergency: 1.usa.gov/1UGuFAA #NatlPrep
  • There are plenty of ways individuals can get prepared. Here’s 10 ways: bit.ly/22tNNpV #NatlPrep

FEMA App

Safety tips during a disaster

  • Know what to do when roads are flooded: “Turn Around Don’t Drown®! It may save your life!” #NatlPrep
  • If you’re already on “high ground” during a flood, stay where you are. Be prepared by having your supplies already stored. #NatlPrep
  • Wildfires often begin unnoticed. Call 911 if you see a #wildfire! More tips: http://go.usa.gov/3AqSx #NatlPrep
  • You may have to evacuate quickly due to a #hurricane. Learn your evacuation routes & identify where you will stay. #NatlPrep
  • An emergency may knock out power. Prepare by stocking non-perishable food items & water. #NatlPrep
  • During an #earthquake DROP, COVER, & HOLD ON. Share this safety message from @TheRock:https://youtu.be/vRdTaLWrpTE #NatlPrep
  • Know your community’s local #hurricane evacuation plan and identify several evacuation routes for your location. #NatlPrep
  • Don’t risk your family’s safety; follow the instructions of local officials – and if told to evacuate, evacuate! #HurricaneStrong

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 5:  September 25-30| Lead Up To National Day Of Action

During this week you will learn how to:

  • Participate in National PrepareAthon! Day on September 30.
  • Add your preparedness activity to www.ready.gov/prepare.
  • Encourage others to do a preparedness activity and register it on www.ready.gov/prepare.
  • Share images of you and your community doing a preparedness activity.
  • Share stories of how being prepared made a difference using #PrepareAthon.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

Be Counted: Add Your Preparedness Activity

  • Be Counted: Add your emergency preparedness activities to the America’s PrepareAthon! website:www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Join millions of Americans taking action for #PrepareAthon by adding your preparedness activities today:www.ready.gov/prepare
  • How many of the 10 #PrepareAthon activities have you completed? Be sure to register your actions:www.ready.gov/prepare
  • Ready, Set, Go! Register your  preparedness activities now: www.ready.gov/prepare
  • There’s no time like the present to register your preparedness activities: www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon

Take Action: Join Others to do a Preparedness Activity

  • America’s #PrepareAthon has 10 ways to participate. Choose your activity: www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Get the scoop on 10 things you can do to get prepared for an emergency here: http://bit.ly/29Kjc0Q#PrepareAthon
  • Be a part of the millions taking action and getting prepared for emergencies. Join us: www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Join a nationwide emergency preparedness movement and prepare for disasters in your area:www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon
  • As part of America’s #PrepareAthon, we are committed to getting prepared for emergencies. Are you?www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon
  • Help spread the word about #PrepareAthon w/ these promotional materials and toolkits: http://bit.ly/1ROi609
  • National #PrepareAthon Day is Sept. 30. What are you doing to prepare?
  • Assembling emergency supplies is one way to participate in America’s #PrepareAthon! Here are 9 more:http://1.usa.gov/1WgMKnH #PrepareAthon
  • Do you have the FEMA app? It’s preparedness at your fingertips. Download it today! http://1.usa.gov/1CRVzMB#PrepareAthon

Share It: Your Preparedness Story May Inspire Others

  • See how communities across the nation are preparing for #disasters! Visit the #PrepareAthon “stories” page:http://1.usa.gov/1Yb7xsk
  • Extra, extra read all about it! Communities everywhere are getting prepared for emergencies:http://1.usa.gov/1Yb7xsk #PrepareAthon
  • Use #PrepareAthon to share how you’re getting your community involved in preparedness.
  • How has preparing made a difference in your life and/or community?  Tell us your #PrepareAthon story!
  • A community in action tends to stay in action. Share your story about taking action for emergencies using #PrepareAthon.
  • Did preparing in advance help you during a disaster?  Share your experience with #PrepareAthon
  • Built an emergency kit? Created a family communications plan? Tell others what you did using #PrepareAthon.
  • I participated in America’s #PrepareAthon so my community can be prepared for emergencies.
  • Have you taken action? Tell others what you did to prepare for emergencies and how it made a difference using #PrepareAthon.
  • I participated in America’s #PrepareAthon so my community can be prepared for emergencies.
  • “It Started Like Any Other Day” Hear how a disaster changed the lives of these survivors: http://bit.ly/1nwuDXu#PrepareAthon

Take Part: It’s National PrepareAthon! Day

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This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePresidential Proclamation

“Despite Two-Thirds of Organizations Naming Active Shooter as a Top Threat, 79 Percent Are Not Fully Prepared”

active-shooter-what-would-you-do

by Jeff Benanto

Everbridge recently partnered with Regina Phelps and Emergency Management and Safety (EMS) Solutions, a provider of professional consulting services in the area of incident management, business continuity planning and exercise design, to conduct research into the security challenges facing today’s companies, especially when it comes to active shooter situations. The “Active Shooter Preparedness” research report was conducted in July, 2016. A total of 888 individuals were surveyed about their safety plans and ability to manage an active shooter situation.

The key findings? Respondents were overwhelmingly concerned about violent acts – such as active shooter situations – taking place at their company or organization. Despite that worry, a majority of respondents also said that they were not properly prepared for an active shooter situation, highlighting communication to affected employees and individuals as one of the major issues. Here’s some more of the data:

  • 69 percent of organizations view an active shooter incident as a potential top threat, but 79 percent replied that their organizations were not fully prepared for this type of event.
  • Communicating with and confirming the safety of those in an impacted building were seen as the biggest challenges during an active shooter situation by 71 percent of organizations. Despite that, 39 percent still said they didn’t have a communications plan in place.
  • 61 percent do not run any active shooter preparedness drills at all.
  • 73 percent said that employees or students are willing to exchange some aspects of privacy for enhanced security.

Download the full report below and stay tuned for more from Everbridge and EMS Solutions, as we will detail the results further, along with prescriptive best practices, in future resources and webinars.

Download (PDF, 507KB)

For more information, including upcoming webinars covering this subject, visit theEverbridge website here.

“OSHA Announces Safety Stand-Down at Worksites Throughout Southeast (Region 4) To Emphasize Response To, Prevention Of Heat-Related Illnesses, Injuries”

Firefox_Screenshot_2016-06-02T00-32-37.584ZU.S. Department of Labor | June 23, 2016

Trade News Release Banner Image

OSHA announces Safety Stand-Down at worksites throughout Southeast
to emphasize response to, prevention of heat-related illnesses, injuries
Thousands of workers overcome by heat illness annually, OSHA reports

ATLANTA – In 2014, 2,630 workers suffered from heat illness while 18 died from heat stroke and related causes on the job – all of which was preventable.

To raise awareness about these dangers, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, employers and trade associations will conduct a one-hour Safety Stand-Down at construction sites and workplaces in eight Southern states from June 27 to July 1, 2016.

Workers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee will stop work voluntarily for one hour at 7 a.m. EDT to conduct safety training focused on how to recognize the symptoms of heat-related illnesses and prevent these illnesses when working in hot weather.

Every year, thousands of workers nationwide suffer from serious heat-related illnesses. OSHA investigations of recent heat-related deaths found a majority involved workers on the job for three or less days – highlighting the need for employers to ensure that new workers become acclimated to the heat when starting or returning to work. Labor-intensive activities in hot weather can increase body temperatures beyond a level that sweating cannot cool normally. Heat illness may manifest initially as heat rash or heat cramps. The illness can quickly elevate to heat exhaustion and then heat stroke without simple prevention steps.

“People who work outdoors in extreme hot weather – in industries such as agriculture, construction, baggage-handling, roofing and landscaping – must be aware of the dangers,” said Kurt Petermeyer, OSHA’s regional administrator for the Southeast. “Employers are responsible for protecting workers from illness or injury when temperatures increase. This safety Stand-Down initiative seeks to educate employers and workers alike. We encourage companies throughout the region to participate.”

For the summer season, OSHA offers tools to assist employers and workers:

  • Heat-illness educational materials in English and Spanish, and a curriculum to be used for workplace training.
  • Online tools such as OSHA worker heat safety tips in a blog, Twitter posts, and at an newly updated heat campaign web page that now includes illustrations of heat exhaustion and heat stroke, an animated video, training resources, and links to an updated heat safety phone app.
  • #WaterRestShade, the official hashtag of the campaign, encourages employers to provide their workers with drinking water, ample breaks, and a shaded area while working outdoors.
  • OSHA continues to work with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to raise awareness on the dangers of working in the heat through its Weather-Ready Nation campaign.

Employers from all states can register for the Stand-Down event at the Associated General Contractors of America Inc. Georgia branch’s website. An informational flyer and toolbox, in English and Spanish, are also available there.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

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Media Contacts:

Michael D’Aquino, 678-237-0630, daquino.michael@dol.gov

Release Number: 16-1177-ATL (170)

“Run, Hide, Fight” – “Surviving An Active Shooter Event”

As much as it pains us all to think about this happening to us, workers need to be informed and taught what to do if this “unfortunate” type of violence ever happens in their workplace.

A new public service announcement in Houston features three strategies to practice in case of a workplace shooting in one of the first safety videos produced as a precaution against active shooters in the wake of the horrific movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo., 10 days ago. Produced by the City of Houston Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and Homeland Security, “RUN. HIDE. FIGHT. Surviving an Active Shooter Event,” is a six-minute video released last week that promotes tips on how to survive a shooting inside the workplace.

“If you are ever to find yourself in the middle of an active shooter event, your survival may depend on whether or not you have a plan,” the narrator says in the video. “The plan doesn’t have to be complicated.”

The video opens with an active shooter beginning to shoot at random employees at a workplace. During the course of the public service announcement, three safety options are presented – run, hide and fight. The video suggests running to be the first option, followed by hiding. Fighting should be considered a “last resort,” according to the narrator.

“Your actions can make a difference for your safety and survival,” the narrator says in the video. “Be aware and be prepared.”

The video is a part of the Ready Houston initiative focusing on regional disaster preparedness, according to Talking Points Memo. The public service announcement has been funded by a grant from the Department of Homeland Security’s Regional Catastrophic Planning Initiative, according to the Houston Chronicle.

The video’s production was not in lieu of the Aurora shooting. The Chronicle reports that filming had wrapped up two weeks prior to the July 20 theater shooting.

“We didn’t release it at the time because we didn’t know it was relevant,” Dennis Storemski, head of the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and Homeland Security Department, told the Houston Chronicle. “Now it is.”

Source: Houston Chronicle

 

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