Advertisements

“Confined Spaces – Supervisor Safety Tip Series” #ConfinedSpace #Safety

Developed by Vivid’s Chief Safety Officer Jill James, a former OSHA inspector, this series examines real hazards in real work environments. This safety tip video explains ways to stay safe while working with Confined Spaces.

Confined spaces are enclosed or partially enclosed spaces of a size such that a worker can squeeze entry for performing assigned work through a narrow opening—they’re tough to get in and out of, tight spaces. These spaces are normally only entered to perform specific tasks and then barricaded to prevent unauthorized access.

As an example, think of a large tank used for holding liquid. Sometimes, these storage units or big containers need to be cleaned out, so you send a worker to get inside and they’re completely surrounded by walls of the structure, with only a small entry/exit hatch for escape if things go awry. Confined spaces create the ideal conditions for the onset of claustrophobia. Confined spaces can be large or small and above or below ground.

This video covers:

Source: Vivid Learning Systems

Advertisements

“VIDEO: Bad Train Car Axle Likely To Blame For Explosive 2013 Derailment In ND, Final NTSB Report Says”

ntsb

CASSELTON, N.D. — In releasing a long-awaited investigation report, the National Transportation Safety Board said a defective axle that broke was the likely cause of a fiery 2013 collision between an oil train and a derailed grain train just outside Casselton.

At an NTSB meeting Tuesday, Feb. 7, in Washington, D.C., crash investigators said the axle had an empty space in the center of it that should have been solid.

NTSB investigators learned that a Pennsylvania company, Standard Steel, made the flawed axle in 2002, among a total of 48 axles manufactured under similar conditions, investigator Michael Hiller said. Thirty-five of those axles, which may have similar defects, are not accounted for, he said.

“We can only assume that the axles have been removed from service due to life cycle, due to other accidents,” he said.

Hiller said 10 of the axles were found and taken out of service. It was discovered that two others were involved in separate accidents in 2010 in Nebraska, he said. No one was hurt in the two accidents, which were derailments that involved broken axles, according to Federal Railroad Administration records.

The Casselton collision between two BNSF trains happened on the afternoon of Dec. 30, 2013. It forced about 1,500 residents to evacuate their homes. No one was seriously injured.

Shortly afterward, NTSB investigators began focusing on the broken axle, which was on a derailed grain car. They found that the axle’s bearings and wheels were remounted by BNSF in 2010 and that more thorough testing of the axle would have caught the flaw.

The Association of American Railroads began requiring such testing of secondhand axles following an NTSB recommendation in April 2014, Hiller said. BNSF spokeswoman Amy McBeth said this sort of testing wasn’t standard practice in 2010.

The crash, which triggered massive explosions and received national media attention, highlighted the dangers of moving crude oil by rail. The tank cars involved were DOT-111s, which Congress has since required to eventually be replaced by more rugged DOT-117s that are believed to be safer.

“Yet the deadlines for replacing variants of the DOT-111 tank car, for carriage of various flammable liquids, fall along a timeline that extends from 2018 to 2029, leaving Americans at heightened risk for years to come,” said NTSB Chairman Christopher Hart. “While few DOT-111 tank cars remain in crude oil service, a vast fleet of these less safe tank cars continues in service for ethanol and other flammable liquids.”

McBeth said that since 2011, BNSF has “advocated for a new, stronger tank car standard and has worked with our customers to get safer tank cars into service sooner.”

The NTSB investigation found that after 13 cars from the westbound grain train derailed, the train’s emergency brakes were applied. At that point, the eastbound oil train was 18 seconds away, traveling at 42 mph. The oil train was likely moving at about that speed when it hit the grain car lying across the track, the NTSB said.

Twenty oil cars derailed, and 18 of those spilled more than 476,000 gallons of oil, fueling a fire that engulfed intact cars and caused them to explode, the NTSB said.

During Tuesday’s meeting, the NTSB showed a video of the crash, including the frantic radio traffic of an oil train crew member. “We are on fire,” he told a train dispatcher. “We are derailed. We are all over. We got to go.”

The front door of the oil train’s lead locomotive was damaged, so the two crew members narrowly escaped through a rear door shortly before the locomotive was engulfed in flames, the NTSB said.

Between the two lead locomotives of the oil train and the 104 tank cars was what’s called a buffer car that’s meant to protect the train crew from hazardous materials. In its investigation report, the NTSB recommended a study of whether more buffer cars should be required.

NTSB spokesman Eric Weiss has said the three-year-plus investigation into the crash took longer than usual because the agency used it as a vehicle to examine train safety features, such as advanced braking systems. Such braking systems, which can reduce stopping distance, would not have prevented the crash because only a few seconds passed between the time the oil train crew saw the derailed grain car and the moment of impact, Hart said.

The oil train engineer and conductor both sued BNSF after the crash. The conductor reached a confidential settlement with the railroad in July, and the engineer’s suit, which also targeted Standard Steel, is still pending.

Phone messages left for Standard Steel representatives were not returned Tuesday.

Source: AGWEEK 

bentonsafetytwitter

“Oakland Warehouse Dance Party Fire a Rare Disaster, But Troubling Trend Continues”

screenshot-www-ktvu-com-2016-12-03-14-04-22

In this age of modern building construction and fire codes, large loss-of-life fires in assembly occupancies just aren’t supposed to happen. But, for some reason, they continue to. I noticed a trend following The Station fire; I thought to myself, “Seems like it’s been about ten years since we’ve seen a fire like this.” I was close; it was 13 years.

The trend started with the Beverly Hills Supper Club fire in Southgate, KY, which killed 165 people in 1977. Thirteen years later, in 1990, 87 people died in a fire at the Bronx, NY Happy Land social club. Another thirteen years later, in 2003, The Station nightclub fire in West Warwick, RI, killed 100.

And here we are, thirteen years later, counting the dead in an electronic dance music party fire at a warehouse turned artist collective/residence/performance space in Oakland, CA known as “Ghost Ship;” the death toll currently stands at 36 and is expected to rise.

NFPA president Jim Pauley spoke to the New York Times about the role fire codes have played in making fires, such as the one that occurred Friday night, rare occurrences. There is no question that codes have come a long way over the last 40 or so years, and if they’re followed, the probability that a fire will have such devastating consequences is low. Today’s codes, like NFPA 101, require automatic sprinkler systems, fire alarm systems, and multiple, protected means of egress from large assembly spaces. (News outlets report the Oakland warehouse was not sprinklered, and means of egress from the second-floor assembly space was limited to a single stair; it is still very early in the investigation.)

So the question we, as fire protection and life safety professionals, must ask is, “Are we doing enough to prevent these tragedies?” Do the codes, as they stand today, provide a “reasonable” level of protection? If we do nothing, is it reasonable to expect that in thirteen years we will see another tragedy like the one this past weekend? Maybe it will be eight years, maybe eleven, but I think the answer is, “most likely.” The alternative is to do “something.” I don’t know what that “something” is. Do we pile more requirements onto the codes, effectively penalizing those who diligently comply with the requirements already on the books? And how effective would new requirements be? If building owners aren’t complying with today’s requirements, should we expect them to comply with new ones? What about enforcement? I know very well the budget constraints faced by municipal fire departments. State and local fire prevention agencies do tremendous work with their limited resources. It’s probably not reasonable to expect code enforcers to catch every illegal large assembly gathering.

The answer eludes me. And it’s troubling. I recently became the staff liaison for NFPA’s Technical Committee on Assembly Occupancies, so this hits close to home. It’s my hope to get the conversation going so we can put an end to this trend. Or we can carry on, status-quo. If we do, history suggests we’ll see another large loss-of-life assembly occupancy fire. Probably in about 13 years, around 2029. I hope I’m wrong.

Source: by Gregory Harrington NFPA xChange

“OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard To Add Two Additional Fit-Testing Protocols”

OSHA Trade ReleaseDOL Logo


U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
Washington, D.C.
www.osha.gov
For Immediate Release

 

October 6, 2016
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

OSHA proposes to amend respiratory protection standard to add
two additional fit-testing protocols

WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration today issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to add two quantitative fit-testing protocols to the agency’s Respiratory Protection Standard. The protocols would apply to employers in the general, shipyard and construction industries.

Appendix A of the standard contains mandatory respirator fit-testing methods that employers must use to ensure their employees’ respirators fit properly and protect the wearer. The standard also allows individuals to submit new fit-test protocols for OSHA approval. TSI Incorporated submitted an application for new protocols for full-facepiece and half-mask elastomeric respirators, and filtering facepiece respirators.

The existing standard contains mandatory testing methods to ensure that employees’ respirators fit properly and are protective. The standard also states that additional fit-test protocols may be submitted for OSHA approval. TSI Incorporated submitted an application for new protocols for full-facepiece and half-mask elastomeric respirators, and filtering facepiece respirators. The proposed protocols are variations of the existing OSHA-accepted PortaCount® protocol, but differ from it by the exercise sets, exercise duration, and sampling sequence.

The agency invites the public to comment on the accuracy and reliability of the proposed protocols, their effectiveness in detecting respirator leakage, and their usefulness in selecting respirators that will protect employees from airborne contaminants in the workplace. More specific issues for public comment are listed in the Federal Register notice.

Individuals may submit comments electronically at www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal. Comments may also be submitted by mail or facsimile; see the Federal Register notice for details. The deadline for submitting comments is Dec. 6, 2016.

This proposed rulemaking would allow employers greater flexibility in choosing fit-testing methods for employees. The proposed rule would not require an employer to update or replace current fit-testing methods, as long as the fit-testing method(s) currently in use meet existing standards. The proposal also would not impose additional costs on any private- or public-sector entity.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

###


U.S. Department of Labor news materials are accessible at http://www.dol.gov. The department’s Reasonable Accommodation Resource Center converts departmental information and documents into alternative formats, which include Braille and large print. For alternative format requests, please contact the department at (202) 693-7828 (voice) or (800) 877-8339 (federal relay).

“What Do You Really Need In Your First Aid Kit?”

First Aid Cabinet

First Aid Cabinet

When it comes to first-aid kits, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is not a micro-manager.

The agency doesn’t tell you what supplies to include in your kit or even how many kits you should have. OSHA only says at 29 CFR 1910.151(b), that “adequate first-aid supplies shall be readily available.”

OSHA, in a 2007 letter of interpretation (LOI), tells you that “If the employer has persons who are trained in first aid, then adequate first-aid supplies must be readily available for use.”

What does OSHA mean by “adequate” supplies? The LOI went on to explain that “employers are required to provide first-aid supplies that are most appropriate to respond to incidents at their workplaces.” The most appropriate supplies can be different for each work-site.

Which begs the question, what does “most appropriate” mean?

Review your OSHA logs and reports

To determine the supplies and the amounts that are “most appropriate” for your workplace, you can review your OSHA 300 logs of injuries and Illnesses and your 301 incident reports. You can also seek the advice of your medical professional, or you can consult the local fire and rescue service or emergency medical services.

Appendix A to §1910.151 refers employers to the American National Standard (ANSI) Z308.1-1998 “Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits,” saying the contents of the kit listed in the ANSI standard should be adequate for small worksites. For larger operations or multiple operations, employers should determine the need for additional kits, additional types of first-aid equipment and supplies, and additional quantities and types of supplies and equipment in the kits.

When stocking your kit, keep in mind the number of employees who may use the kit, and make sure it is easy to access.

While OSHA does not prohibit employers from locking up first-aid supplies, a lock cannot keep the first aid supplies from being “readily available.” Because a lock may limit accessibility in an emergency situation, employers who secure first-aid supplies need to train employees on how to access those supplies, and must ensure that someone is always available to provide access to the supplies.

First-aid kits might not be enough

It some cases, first-aid kits aren’t enough to meet OSHA’s requirement to provide medical supplies that match the hazards of the workplace. For instance, OSHA’s standards for logging operations, permit-required confined spaces, and electric power generation, transmission, and distribution require training in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for certain employees.

In addition, §1910.151(c) requires you to provide “suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body” when employees may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials.

Some state-plan states may have slightly different or more stringent requirements than those of federal OSHA. In California, CalOSHA requires that a physician approves the contents of workplace first-aid kits. If you are in a state-plan state, be sure to check your state’s requirements.

OSHA also refers to ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2014 as an additional, but not a mandatory guide for First Aid Kits and types as noted  in the link here: https://is.gd/m2zBGf

 

 

“Regulated Industry Successfully Challenges New OSHA Process Safety Management Enforcement Policies”

On September 23, 2016, the D.C. Court of Appeals ruled that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) wrongfully adopted new safety requirements for fertilizer dealers who have to comply with the Process Safety Management Standard. Specifically, OSHA improperly issued a memorandum redefining the “retail facility” exemption and did not allow fertilizer dealers to comment on the new rules.

OSHA has promulgated a Process Safety Management (PSM) standard that implements certain requirements for employers to protect the safety of those who work with or near highly hazardous chemicals, and help prevent unexpected releases of such chemicals. Traditionally, retail establishments do not have to comply with the PSM standard because hazardous chemicals are present only in small volumes in such instances.

Following a 2013 explosion at a West Texas Fertilizer facility (videos above) that left 15 people dead after a large amount of ammonium nitrate caught fire, OSHA issued an enforcement memorandum expanding the scope of the PSM standard to cover more retail establishments, including agricultural dealers who sell anhydrous ammonia to farmers. Yet OSHA did this without requesting comments from the public or industry.

Working with legal counsel, the Agricultural Retailers Association (ARA) and The Fertilizer Institute organized a successful lawsuit challenging the new rule. The D.C. Court of Appeals ruled that OSHA violated the Occupational Safety and Health Act when it issued the enforcement memorandum, finding that OSHA had engaged in rulemaking, and was thus bound to solicit comments from the public and industry. As a result of the successful lawsuit, ag retailers do not have to comply with the PSM standard until OSHA receives comments from the public and industry regarding the proposed changes to the PSM standard, which could take several years to finalize.

Commenting on the decision, Harold Cooper, chairman of the ARA, said that “[a]s an industry, ag retailers tend to be complacent about regulations that come our way. We keep our heads down and do what’s required,” he said. “But this rule would have limited farmers’ and retailers’ options through an agency’s improper regulatory overreach. Thankfully, ARA was uniquely prepared and positioned to defend our industry. They gave us a vehicle to fight and win this battle.”

The court’s ruling will make it more difficult in the future for OSHA to issue de facto standards without undertaking proper rulemaking procedures and soliciting comments from the public. Companies should proactively work with skilled legal counsel who can assist on rulemaking processes that impact workplace health and safety.

Source: 9/27/2016 by Daniel BirnbaumMichael Taylor  | BakerHostetler

 

 

 

 

 

“N95 Day: A NIOSH-Approved Holiday”

info1_eg8_r3_deliv

 

Today is the 5th annual N95 Day, which focuses on respiratory protection awareness and proper use of N95 respirators. Here are some ways you can participate:

  • Social media. Look for N95-related information on Twitter (@NIOSH, @NPPTL, #N95Day) Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest as well as the annual N95 Day NIOSH Science Blog. Share NIOSH’s infographics, and be sure to follow ASSE (@ASSE_Safety) and other campaign partners to find free training, resources, and safety tips.
  • Hospital respiratory protection program resources. NIOSH has launched a web page of resources dedicated to hospital respiratory protection programs.
  • Webinars. NIOSH is presenting two webinars this year: 1) The Science Behind Respirator Fit Testing in the Workplace: Past, Present and Future; and 2)  Why Do We Have to Fit Test? And Why Every Year? Although registration is now closed, the agency will post the webinar videos and slides after the event. Check the campaign page for updates.
  • ASSE materials. Check out ASSE’s Tech Brief on ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015, Practices for Respiratory Protection and visit our respiratory protection standards page.

Source: ASSE, NIOSH, CDC

“National Preparedness Month 2016” – “Are You Ready?” #NatPrep

Don't Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.  

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

National Preparedness Month

September is recognized as National Preparedness Month (NPM) which serves as a reminder that we all must take action to prepare, now and throughout the year, for the types of emergencies that could affect us where we live, work, and also where we visit. Due to the success of last year’s theme, “Don’t Wait, Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today,” will be returning for this September with a continuing emphasis on preparedness for youth, older adults, and people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs.  Thank you for taking time help make America more prepared for emergencies.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHow To Use This Toolkit

The National Preparedness Month Social Media Toolkit has key marketing and preparedness messaging you can print or share on your social media channels to spread the word to colleagues, family and friends throughout the month of September and beyond! You can either copy these messages directly or customize them to reach your audience.

This section is Expanded. Click to Collapse2016 Weekly Themes

  • Promote NPM:  August 28-September 3                  Kickoff to National Preparedness Month
  • Week 2:  September 4-10                                            Preparing Family & Friends
  • Week 3:  September 11-17                                          Preparing Through Service
  • Week 4:  September 18-24                                          Individual Preparedness
  • Week 5:  September 25-30                                          Lead up to National PrepareAthon Day

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHashtags & Emoji’s

  • #NatlPrep
  • #YouthPrep
  • #PrepareAthon if you are conducting a preparedness exercise, tabletop discussion, or sharing a preparedness-in-action moment.
  • Feel free to add emoji’s (the little pictures on your mobile phone keyboard) to your social messages.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseGraphics, Logo, Videos, & Related Links

Check out tips and ideas to promote preparedness content. For more engaging content, attach graphics that are sized appropriately for specific social media posts (i.e. Twitter & Facebook).

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePromote NPM: August 28-September 3| Kickoff To National Preparedness Month

Social Media Content

This content can be used on various social media channels, and is less than 140 characters.

  • #NatlPrep Month starts 9/1. Promote the theme “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” Tools: www.ready.gov/september
  • National Preparedness Month starts September 1! Follow #NatlPrep for tips. More info: www.ready.gov/september
  • “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” Get started here: www.ready.gov/make-a-plan #NatlPrep
  • National Preparedness Month has a different theme every week. Details: www.ready.gov/september #NatlPrep
  • Share your plans for National Preparedness Month using the hashtag #NatlPrep
  • Get ready to go from awareness to action during National Preparedness Month. #NatlPrep
  • RT This: “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” #NatlPrep
  • Creating your Family Emergency Communication Plan starts with one simple question “What if?” 1.usa.gov/1JwEwRG #NatlPrep
  • Does your family know what to do during a disaster? Start a plan today. #NatlPrep
  • You may not be with family when an emergency happens.  Create an emergency plan now: 1.usa.gov/1JwEwRG #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 2- September 4-10| Preparing Family & Friends

During this week you will know how to:

  • Contact family and friends before, during, and after an emergency.
  • Make a family emergency communication plan
  • Consider that your entire family may not be together during a disaster- make a plan of how you will reunite after an emergency.
  • Prepare for the unique needs of your family members, friends and neighbors.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

View in FEMA Multimedia Library

Social Media Content

Family Emergency Communication Plan

  • First week of #NatlPrep month is about getting all generations prepared. Anyone aged 2-102 should be ready for disasters!
  • Check out these tools to start your family emergency plan today: www.ready.gov/kids/make-a-plan #NatlPrep
  • Preparing the family for an emergency is as simple as a convo over dinner. Get started with tips fromwww.ready.gov #NatlPrep
  • What’s in your wallet? Part of our family emergency communication plan can be. Get the pocket-sized version: 1.usa.gov/1LPuV9o #NatlPrep
  • Tip: Keep important numbers written down in your wallet, not just on your phone: 1.usa.gov/1LPuV9o #NatlPrep
  • Take part in #PrepareAthon Day on 9/30 by participating in a preparedness discussion or training: 1.usa.gov/1S6oT4U #NatlPrep
  • Complete the actions in this #preparedness puzzle, you’ll be 10 steps closer to being prepared for an emergency: bit.ly/22tNNpV #NatlPrep
  • Download a group texting app so the entire family can keep in touch before, during & after an emergency. #NatlPrep

Youth Preparedness

  • Sending the kids off to school? Make sure they know what to do in case of an emergency. www.Ready.gov/kids#NatlPrep
  • Include your pet in your emergency preparedness plans. Info: www.ready.gov/pets #NatlPrep
  • Nearly 70M children are in school/childcare each workday. Make a family plan to know how to reunite during an emergency #NatlPrep
  • Kids bored? We can help. Check out our online Ready Kids build a kit game: http://go.usa.gov/5hS5 #NatlPrep
  • Ask your child’s school for a copy of their emergency plan for you to keep at home or work #NatlPrep
  • Fill out emergency contact numbers with your kids before they go #BackToSchool #NatlPrep

Caregivers/Older Adults

  • Caregivers, get all the resources you need in case of an emergency. Check out ready.gov for tips. #NatlPrep
  • Dads at work, Gram’s with friends, kids are at school when disaster strikes. How will you get in touch? Don’t Wait. Communicate. #NatlPrep
  • Make sure parents and grandparents know how to text/post messages for emergencies. #NatlPrep
  • Make sure your parents/grandparents have a *secure* digital copy of their insurance info. #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 3:  September 11-17|Preparing Through Service

During this week you will know how to:

  • Understand the importance of community preparedness.
  • Get involved with your community organization or plan with neighbors.
  • Highlight local preparedness efforts in your community.
  • Celebrate first responders.
  • Celebrate emergency-focused organizations who serve communities.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

National Day of Service & Remembrance

  • I will [fill in your service project] What will you do for your community on this National Day of Service & Remembrance? Tell us using #911Day
  • Do at least 1 good deed for your community on 9/11: http://bit.ly/29DymSw  #911Day
  • Thousands of people all around the nation will commit to a day of service on September 11. Be a part of it and share your experience! Using #911Day
  • How will you give back on National Day of Service & Remembrance? Snap It. Tag It. Post It. #911Day

Volunteer with an Organization

Help Your Community Get Prepared

  • Give a shout out to first responders and community service organizations that have made a difference in your community! #NatlPrep
  • Looking for an opportunity to serve your community? Start with steps found on @ServeDotGovhttp://bit.ly/2a3FAEr #NatlPrep
  • Emergency preparedness is a “whole community” effort. Get involved in your community today:http://bit.ly/2a3FAEr #NatlPrep
  • Your neighbor may have to rely on you during an emergency. Will you be ready:  http://bit.ly/29S1giS  #NatlPrep
  • #PrepareAthon can help your community discover activities to keep you and your neighbors safe:www.ready.gov/prepare  #NatlPrep
  • Visit our map to find resources & info on preparedness in your community:http://www.ready.gov/america/local/index.html #NatlPrep
  • At your next home owners association meeting share this community preparedness resource: http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Your neighbor may need you when an emergency hits. Plan with your neighbor today. http://1.usa.gov/1WVsAy7#NatlPrep
  • “Community preparedness is a shared responsibility.” Share this resource with your community:http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Did you know? FEMA has online trainings to help get your community prepared. Take them today:http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Almost half of Americans expect to rely on their neighbors after a disaster. Plan today: http://1.usa.gov/1QmIZGG#NatlPrep
  • We can’t do it without YOU! Increase your community’s preparedness by joining #PrepareAthonwww.ready.gov/prepare #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 4:  September 18-24| Individual Preparedness

During this week you will know how to:

  • Understand actions you can take to be prepared for emergency
  • Be aware of specific needs you may have if an emergency strikes like: medication, power needs, eye classes, devices that you may count on, pet needs, etc.
  • Understand safety tips and protective actions you can take before or during a disaster.
  • Download the FEMA app for disaster resources, weather alerts, and safety tips

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

General

  • Be informed, make a plan, build a kit, get involved. Everyone can take steps to prepare for an emergency:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcnCQ_pdVCY #NatlPrep
  • Make disaster preparedness a part of your everyday routine and protect yourself and your loved ones:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcnCQ_pdVCY #NatlPrep
  • Being prepared is part of who you are, and disaster preparation is no different: www.ready.gov/myplan #NatlPrep
  • Take meds? Plan ahead by keeping a copy of your Rx + 1 week supply in a safe place. #NatlPrep
  • Keep a radio & extra batteries handy to listen for info from local officials if you lose power. #NatlPrep
  • Gather your supplies before a hurricane so you won’t find yourself with empty shelves. Supply list:www.ready.gov/kit. #NatlPrep
  • If you rely on public transportation, contact your local emergency management agency about evac info ahead of a hurricane. #NatlPrep
  • Sign up to receive text or e-mail alerts about emergencies like wildfire from your local Office of Emergency Management. #NatlPrep
  • Are you getting your community prepared for a #tornado #hurricane or #wildfire? Add your activity:www.ready.gov/prepare  #NatlPrep
  • Wireless Emergency Alerts can save lives! Be smart. Know your alerts and warnings. Learn more: 1.usa.gov/1jLKAGr #NatlPrep
  • Make sure you know what your insurance policy covers before an emergency: 1.usa.gov/1UGuFAA #NatlPrep
  • There are plenty of ways individuals can get prepared. Here’s 10 ways: bit.ly/22tNNpV #NatlPrep

FEMA App

Safety tips during a disaster

  • Know what to do when roads are flooded: “Turn Around Don’t Drown®! It may save your life!” #NatlPrep
  • If you’re already on “high ground” during a flood, stay where you are. Be prepared by having your supplies already stored. #NatlPrep
  • Wildfires often begin unnoticed. Call 911 if you see a #wildfire! More tips: http://go.usa.gov/3AqSx #NatlPrep
  • You may have to evacuate quickly due to a #hurricane. Learn your evacuation routes & identify where you will stay. #NatlPrep
  • An emergency may knock out power. Prepare by stocking non-perishable food items & water. #NatlPrep
  • During an #earthquake DROP, COVER, & HOLD ON. Share this safety message from @TheRock:https://youtu.be/vRdTaLWrpTE #NatlPrep
  • Know your community’s local #hurricane evacuation plan and identify several evacuation routes for your location. #NatlPrep
  • Don’t risk your family’s safety; follow the instructions of local officials – and if told to evacuate, evacuate! #HurricaneStrong

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 5:  September 25-30| Lead Up To National Day Of Action

During this week you will learn how to:

  • Participate in National PrepareAthon! Day on September 30.
  • Add your preparedness activity to www.ready.gov/prepare.
  • Encourage others to do a preparedness activity and register it on www.ready.gov/prepare.
  • Share images of you and your community doing a preparedness activity.
  • Share stories of how being prepared made a difference using #PrepareAthon.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

Be Counted: Add Your Preparedness Activity

  • Be Counted: Add your emergency preparedness activities to the America’s PrepareAthon! website:www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Join millions of Americans taking action for #PrepareAthon by adding your preparedness activities today:www.ready.gov/prepare
  • How many of the 10 #PrepareAthon activities have you completed? Be sure to register your actions:www.ready.gov/prepare
  • Ready, Set, Go! Register your  preparedness activities now: www.ready.gov/prepare
  • There’s no time like the present to register your preparedness activities: www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon

Take Action: Join Others to do a Preparedness Activity

  • America’s #PrepareAthon has 10 ways to participate. Choose your activity: www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Get the scoop on 10 things you can do to get prepared for an emergency here: http://bit.ly/29Kjc0Q#PrepareAthon
  • Be a part of the millions taking action and getting prepared for emergencies. Join us: www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Join a nationwide emergency preparedness movement and prepare for disasters in your area:www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon
  • As part of America’s #PrepareAthon, we are committed to getting prepared for emergencies. Are you?www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon
  • Help spread the word about #PrepareAthon w/ these promotional materials and toolkits: http://bit.ly/1ROi609
  • National #PrepareAthon Day is Sept. 30. What are you doing to prepare?
  • Assembling emergency supplies is one way to participate in America’s #PrepareAthon! Here are 9 more:http://1.usa.gov/1WgMKnH #PrepareAthon
  • Do you have the FEMA app? It’s preparedness at your fingertips. Download it today! http://1.usa.gov/1CRVzMB#PrepareAthon

Share It: Your Preparedness Story May Inspire Others

  • See how communities across the nation are preparing for #disasters! Visit the #PrepareAthon “stories” page:http://1.usa.gov/1Yb7xsk
  • Extra, extra read all about it! Communities everywhere are getting prepared for emergencies:http://1.usa.gov/1Yb7xsk #PrepareAthon
  • Use #PrepareAthon to share how you’re getting your community involved in preparedness.
  • How has preparing made a difference in your life and/or community?  Tell us your #PrepareAthon story!
  • A community in action tends to stay in action. Share your story about taking action for emergencies using #PrepareAthon.
  • Did preparing in advance help you during a disaster?  Share your experience with #PrepareAthon
  • Built an emergency kit? Created a family communications plan? Tell others what you did using #PrepareAthon.
  • I participated in America’s #PrepareAthon so my community can be prepared for emergencies.
  • Have you taken action? Tell others what you did to prepare for emergencies and how it made a difference using #PrepareAthon.
  • I participated in America’s #PrepareAthon so my community can be prepared for emergencies.
  • “It Started Like Any Other Day” Hear how a disaster changed the lives of these survivors: http://bit.ly/1nwuDXu#PrepareAthon

Take Part: It’s National PrepareAthon! Day

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseCongressional Co-Chairs

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePresidential Proclamation

“Despite Two-Thirds of Organizations Naming Active Shooter as a Top Threat, 79 Percent Are Not Fully Prepared”

active-shooter-what-would-you-do

by Jeff Benanto

Everbridge recently partnered with Regina Phelps and Emergency Management and Safety (EMS) Solutions, a provider of professional consulting services in the area of incident management, business continuity planning and exercise design, to conduct research into the security challenges facing today’s companies, especially when it comes to active shooter situations. The “Active Shooter Preparedness” research report was conducted in July, 2016. A total of 888 individuals were surveyed about their safety plans and ability to manage an active shooter situation.

The key findings? Respondents were overwhelmingly concerned about violent acts – such as active shooter situations – taking place at their company or organization. Despite that worry, a majority of respondents also said that they were not properly prepared for an active shooter situation, highlighting communication to affected employees and individuals as one of the major issues. Here’s some more of the data:

  • 69 percent of organizations view an active shooter incident as a potential top threat, but 79 percent replied that their organizations were not fully prepared for this type of event.
  • Communicating with and confirming the safety of those in an impacted building were seen as the biggest challenges during an active shooter situation by 71 percent of organizations. Despite that, 39 percent still said they didn’t have a communications plan in place.
  • 61 percent do not run any active shooter preparedness drills at all.
  • 73 percent said that employees or students are willing to exchange some aspects of privacy for enhanced security.

Download the full report below and stay tuned for more from Everbridge and EMS Solutions, as we will detail the results further, along with prescriptive best practices, in future resources and webinars.

Download (PDF, 507KB)

For more information, including upcoming webinars covering this subject, visit theEverbridge website here.

“The Importance of Eyewash Station Maintenance and Monitoring”

Many different types of industries are required to install and maintain eyewash stations for their employees’ safety and health. These eyewash stations are an important safety device that can be instrumental for mitigating a number of different types of eye injuries.

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) reports that work-related eye injuries cost more than $300 million per year in lost production time, medical expenses and worker compensation. Eyewash stations, whether permanently connected to a source of potable water or having self-contained flushing fluid, can help save workers’ eyesight and reduce costs associated with eye injuries.

However, eyewash stations require proper maintenance or they may present health hazards that can worsen or cause additional damage to a worker’s eye. According to OSHA, water found in improperly maintained eyewash stations is more likely to contain microorganisms that thrive in stagnant or untreated water and are known to cause infections.

“When an incident occurs and a worker uses an eyewash station that is not maintained, organisms that could be in the water can come into contact with the eyes, skin or may even be inhaled,” said Franco Seif, President of Clark Seif Clark. “A partial list of microorganisms that OSHA reports could contaminant an improperly maintained eyewash station include:Acanthamoeba, Legionella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A worker using an eyewash station after exposure to a hazardous chemical or material may have eye injuries that make the eye more susceptible to infection. In addition, workers with skin damage or compromised immune systems are at an increased risk of developing illnesses from contaminated water.”

To help prevent these scenarios from occurring, Clark Seif Clark offers eyewash station monitoring and microbial pathogen testing services. They also provide a wide range of other industrial hygiene and occupational, health and safety services. To help educate people about eyewash stations and potential microbial risks from improper maintenance, Clark Seif Clark recently sponsored an educational video that can be seen above and at: https://youtu.be/Nb9XdcO1cZk

To learn more about microbial testing and monitoring or other occupational, environmental, indoor air quality, health and safety and consulting services, please visit www.csceng.com, email csc@csceng.com or call (800) 807-1118.

About Clark Seif Clark
CSC was established in 1989 to help clients in both public and private sectors address environmental, IAQ, and health and safety (EH&S) issues. CSC is a leading provider of these services with multiple offices along the western seaboard and southwest. The company believes in science-based protocols and has a strong background in engineering, making them the preferred environmental consultants to industrial clients, healthcare facilities, architects, schools, builders, contractors, developers and real estate professionals.

Source: Chatsworth, CA – WEBWIRE – Monday, August 8, 2016

%d bloggers like this: