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“US House of Representatives Seeking to Make OSHA VPP Permanent”

Washington – Several members of the House have joined forces to reintroduce bipartisan legislation that would make permanent OSHA’s Voluntary Protection Programs.

Reps. Todd Rokita (R-IN), Gene Green (D-TX) and Martha Roby (R-AL) claim the Voluntary Protection Program Act is “sound policy that is not only good for the employers and employees but for the American economy overall,” Rokita said in a March 9 press release.

The proposed legislation would denote a long-term commitment to OSHA’s program, which recognizes worksites that achieve exemplary occupational safety and health performance. To be accepted into the program, worksites must implement safety and health management systems that yield below-average injury and illness rates. Successful worksites involved in VPP then gain exemption from certain OSHA inspections.

More than 2,200 worksites covering approximately 900,000 employees have participated in VPP since its 1982 inception. The VPP Act would codify the program, meaning Congress would be unable to withdraw its funding.

The legislation has remained before the Senate’s Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee since it was read twice and referred to the committee in late April 2016.

“The Voluntary Protection Program is one of the few programs that has achieved unified support from both union and non-unionized labor, small and large businesses, and government,” Green said in the release. “I am proud to work with colleagues on both sides of the aisle to codify this important safety program that saves money while protecting workers.”

Added Roby: “The best way to ensure worker safety is through partnerships, not penalties. VPP helps companies become compliant with workplace safety rules on the front end to avoid costly fines and harmful penalties on the back end. It’s a smart way to ensure a safe and productive workplace, while also making government smaller and more efficient.”

The House considered similar legislation – also introduced by Rokita, Green, and Roby – in May 2015. It was referred to the Workforce Protections Subcommittee that November.

Given the current political climate,it would not be surprising to see this adopted at some point in the near future. Time will tell.

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“The 2017 Workplace Safety Puzzle” #OSHA #Safety

From 2015 to 2017, OSHA fines increased almost 80%, making the cost of noncompliance too expensive for most organizations to ignore.

This new infographic, created for the 2017 Safety Summit, aims to help safety pros, like you, strengthen compliance, reduce costs, and improve operational efficiency.

 

“Safety Topic Information For a Better Safety Committee at Your Workplace”

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“4 Character Traits Of Respected Safety Leaders”

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If you want to become an effective and respected safety leader, work on these personality traits.

Back in 2009, when Google first launched their Project Oxygen employee survey, they were looking for a way to help their managers be better. They were also looking for ways that managers and supervisors could help engage employees better.

What Google soon discovered from their employees is not what they had thought. Google’s managers were already incredibly technically proficient. But that’s not what Google’s employees necessarily wanted from their managers. Employees wanted more than technical knowledge. Employees wanted managers with great people skills.

Workplaces whose managers have great people skills have lower employee turnover and higher levels of engagement. But where do you as a supervisor or safety manager acquire good people-skills? It turns out, good people skills have much to do with character and personality traits.

There’s an assumption that you already have the basics of safety knowledge under your belt.That needs to be a given. If you don’t have the basics of safety already, you must get busy acquiring those skills. And there’s an assumption that you genuinely want to make your workplace better.

Here are four of the most critical personality traits to have to be able to make you more effective and respected in your supervisory and management duties in safety:

Kindness. You cannot have a successful safety culture without courtesy and respect at the very foundation. Kindness, as a personality trait, is at the foundation of courtesy and respect. It’s impossible to be genuinely courteous if you are mean-spirited. Kindness is crucial to being a respected safety leader. Treating people with kindness is not something you can fake for long. Eventually, you will tire of putting on a fake smile. You will be found out. Kindness comes from genuinely caring about people. When you can offer kindness to one person on a job site, and make the job site safe for one other person, you are being kind to every other person. Kindness is not weakness. It takes strength to openly care about others in a way that they feel it.

Integrity. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines integrity as the quality of being honest and fair; the state of being complete or whole. But in short-form, people know when someone lacks integrity – or when their integrity can be compromised. Supervisors and safety people with integrity refuse to allow excuses and blame to get in the way of carrying out their safety responsibilities. There are no shortcuts with people of integrity. People of integrity do what they say and say what they do. As the saying goes, they walk the walk. Front-line employees depend on their supervisors and safety people to have integrity. Integrity has a way of transcending a message of “how we do things ’round here.” Remember, employees will always be checking you out to see if you believe what you have to say. If you don’t believe it, your integrity will be suspect.

Humility. Again, like kindness, you can’t fake humility for long. Acting humble and being humble are very different things. Ultimately, what humility really is, is the quality or state of not thinking that you are better than others. Yes, supervisors and safety people may be in superior positions on the hierarchy scale, but that does not make them superior people. No amount of schooling, titles, certifications or money makes one person more superior. In fact, employees instantly know when someone supposes them self to be superior. It’s obvious in the way they communicate and the way that they talk down to employees. Humility is the personality trait that communicates to others that one person is no more important than another. There may be more responsibility with one job over another, but that does not make one person more important than another. Humility builds teamwork.

Generosity. This is what drives giving, understanding and selflessness. The question could be asked: if you could give of yourself to make another person’s circumstances better, why wouldn’t you? Generous people don’t even stop to think about reasons that they wouldn’t. Generous people give. That’s what they do. They give credit, give applause, give responsibility and they give examples of how to do it. Generous people do what they can to make someone else’s day better. Generous people do it without being asked. Generosity is not about money. Generosity is about time, energy, effort and helping others to succeed. Generous people know the words of Bob Dylan who once said, “just when you think you have nothing left to give, you find out you were wrong.”

If you want to become an effective and respected safety leader, work on each of the four personality traits. You will always be able to find work. You will always find yourself surrounded by others who are of like-mind. Besides, who wouldn’t want to work in a job whose supervisor or safety person owned those character and personality traits?

I know they work, I practice them every day!!

Source: Kevin Burns @KevBurnsBGI on Twitter & KevBurns.com

“N95 Day: A NIOSH-Approved Holiday”

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Today is the 5th annual N95 Day, which focuses on respiratory protection awareness and proper use of N95 respirators. Here are some ways you can participate:

  • Social media. Look for N95-related information on Twitter (@NIOSH, @NPPTL, #N95Day) Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest as well as the annual N95 Day NIOSH Science Blog. Share NIOSH’s infographics, and be sure to follow ASSE (@ASSE_Safety) and other campaign partners to find free training, resources, and safety tips.
  • Hospital respiratory protection program resources. NIOSH has launched a web page of resources dedicated to hospital respiratory protection programs.
  • Webinars. NIOSH is presenting two webinars this year: 1) The Science Behind Respirator Fit Testing in the Workplace: Past, Present and Future; and 2)  Why Do We Have to Fit Test? And Why Every Year? Although registration is now closed, the agency will post the webinar videos and slides after the event. Check the campaign page for updates.
  • ASSE materials. Check out ASSE’s Tech Brief on ANSI/ASSE Z88.2-2015, Practices for Respiratory Protection and visit our respiratory protection standards page.

Source: ASSE, NIOSH, CDC

“Despite Two-Thirds of Organizations Naming Active Shooter as a Top Threat, 79 Percent Are Not Fully Prepared”

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by Jeff Benanto

Everbridge recently partnered with Regina Phelps and Emergency Management and Safety (EMS) Solutions, a provider of professional consulting services in the area of incident management, business continuity planning and exercise design, to conduct research into the security challenges facing today’s companies, especially when it comes to active shooter situations. The “Active Shooter Preparedness” research report was conducted in July, 2016. A total of 888 individuals were surveyed about their safety plans and ability to manage an active shooter situation.

The key findings? Respondents were overwhelmingly concerned about violent acts – such as active shooter situations – taking place at their company or organization. Despite that worry, a majority of respondents also said that they were not properly prepared for an active shooter situation, highlighting communication to affected employees and individuals as one of the major issues. Here’s some more of the data:

  • 69 percent of organizations view an active shooter incident as a potential top threat, but 79 percent replied that their organizations were not fully prepared for this type of event.
  • Communicating with and confirming the safety of those in an impacted building were seen as the biggest challenges during an active shooter situation by 71 percent of organizations. Despite that, 39 percent still said they didn’t have a communications plan in place.
  • 61 percent do not run any active shooter preparedness drills at all.
  • 73 percent said that employees or students are willing to exchange some aspects of privacy for enhanced security.

Download the full report below and stay tuned for more from Everbridge and EMS Solutions, as we will detail the results further, along with prescriptive best practices, in future resources and webinars.

Download (PDF, 507KB)

For more information, including upcoming webinars covering this subject, visit theEverbridge website here.

“Transforming EHS Performance Measurement Through Leading Indicators”

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The National Safety Council, Campbell Institute performed a survey and study called “Transforming EHS Performance Measurement Through Leading Indicators” The information for the report was obtained from EHS & Safety Managers from across the country.

The report is an excellent compilation of the survey and the findings are intriguing. You can download a copy of the report here: http://goo.gl/KYAIxi

“Does Your Facility Have An Effective Safety Culture? Is Safety Truly A Priority?

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One way to improve the effectiveness of your safety process is to change the way it is measured.

Measurement is an important part of any management process and forms the basis for continuous improvement. Measuring safety performance is no different and effectively doing so will compound the success of your improvement efforts.

Finding the perfect measure of safety is a difficult task. What you want is to measure both the bottom-line results of safety as well as how well your facility is doing at preventing accidents and incidents. To do this, you will use a combination of lagging and leading indicators of safety performance.

Lagging indicators of safety performance

What is a lagging indicator?

Lagging indicators measure a company’s incidents in the form of past accident statistics.

Examples include:

  • Injury frequency and severity
  • OSHA recordable injuries
  • Lost workdays
  • Worker’s compensation costs

Why use lagging indicators?

Lagging indicators are the traditional safety metrics used to indicate progress toward compliance with safety rules. These are the bottom-line numbers that evaluate the overall effectiveness of safety at your facility. They tell you how many people got hurt and how badly.

The drawbacks of lagging indicators.

The major drawback to only using lagging indicators of safety performance is that they tell you how many people got hurt and how badly, but not how well your company is doing at preventing incidents and accidents.

The reactionary nature of lagging indicators makes them a poor gauge of prevention. For example, when managers see a low injury rate, they may become complacent and put safety on the bottom of their to-do list, when in fact, there are numerous risk factors present in the workplace that will contribute to future injuries.

Leading indicators of safety performance

What is a leading indicator?

A leading indicator is a measure preceding or indicating a future event used to drive and measure activities carried out to prevent and control injury.

Examples include:

  • Safety training
  • Ergonomic opportunities identified and corrected
  • Reduction of MSD risk factors
  • Employee perception surveys
  • Safety audits

Why use leading indicators?

Leading indicators are focused on future safety performance and continuous improvement. These measures are proactive in nature and report what employees are doing on a regular basis to prevent injuries.

Best practices for using leading indicators

Companies dedicated to safety excellence are shifting their focus to using leading indicators to drive continuous improvement. Lagging indicators measure failure; leading indicators measure performance, and that’s what we’re after!

According to workplace safety thought leader Aubrey Daniels, leading indicators should:

  1. Allow you to see small improvements in performance
  2. Measure the positive: what people are doing versus failing to do
  3. Enable frequent feedback to all stakeholders
  4. Be credible to performers
  5. Be predictive
  6. Increase constructive problem solving around safety
  7. Make it clear what needs to be done to get better
  8. Track Impact versus Intention

While there is no perfect or “one size fits all” measure for safety, following these criteria will help you track impactful leading indicators.

How Caterpillar used leading indicators to create world-class safety

An article on EHS Today titled, “Caterpillar: Using Leading Indicators to Create World-Class Safety” recaps an interview with two Caterpillar executives who explained how they were able to successfully transition to a culture that utilizes leading indicators for safety.

According to the execs at Caterpillar, “… traditional metrics can help companies tell the score at the end of the game, but they don’t help employers understand the strengths and weaknesses of their safety efforts and cannot help managers predict future success.”

By utilizing a Safety Strategic Improvement Process (SIP) that emphasized leading indicators of safety, they saw an 85% reduction of injuries and $450 million in direct/indirect cost savings.

According to the article, the critical elements of the SIP included:

  • Enterprise-wide statement of safety culture.
  • Global process, tools and metrics.
  • Top-down leadership of and engagement with the process.
  • Clearly defined and linked roles and responsibilities.
  • Clearly defined accountability.
  • Consistent methods establishing targets and reporting performance.
  • Consistent criteria for prioritizing issues and aligning resources.
  • Recognition for positive behavior and performance.
Conclusion

To improve the safety performance of your facility, you should use a combination of leading and lagging indicators.

When using leading indicators, it’s important to make your metrics based on impact. For example, don’t just track the number and attendance of safety meetings and training sessions – measure the impact of the safety meeting by determining the number of people who met the key learning objectives of the meeting / training.

What metrics do you use to measure your facility’s safety performance? Do you use a combination of leading and lagging indicators?

“Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs & Employee Engagement In Safety”

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Note: Click on picture for Full View!

Abraham Maslow was an American psychologist who created the Hierarchy of Needs, a theory which argued that psychological health was dependent on the fulfilling of needs in order of priority. This theory put forward the idea that humans must have their basic needs met in order to pursue their own personal growth and development. The needs in Maslow’s theory are, in order:

  1. Survival – These are biological needs such as food, water, shelter, sleep.
  2. Safety – This need requires stability, security, order, law, and protection from elements.
  3. Belonging – This is a need for friendship, love, affection, and intimacy
  4. Importance – The need to achieve and master things, independence, and self-respect
  5. Self-Actualization – This is the need that requires people to fulfill their potential and what they believe they’re capable of.

These needs are the basis for human survival and growth. But look closer at them. They play a large part in employee engagement levels and how your employees are engaged and motivated within your company. Let’s break it down and see how this works:

  • Survival – We know this is a basic need. This includes the need to have a job, a salary that pays the bills, and a sense of financial independence.
  • Safety – When we have jobs, we need to know that they are secure. With the way the job market is nowadays, it’s hard for many to move past this second most basic need. It also causes individuals to need structure in the workplace, with a chain of command and a process for their duties so they feel confident that they’re doing their job correctly.
  • Belonging – People need to feel like they’re part of a team, that they are a part of something bigger. As employees, humans need to know their individual contributions are valued by the company. If your organizational is setup around team principles, then this sense of belonging and “camaraderie” should come almost naturally.
  • Importance – This need dovetails into the “belonging” need in the sense that individuals need to feel like they’re important to a team, projects, and the overall organization. This need is most prevalent inside of larger companies where the need to engage employees on a personal level becomes harder and harder for higher level management.
  • Self-Actualization – Most employees have some level of ambition and want to achieve more than where they’re currently positioned. Giving them opportunities for growth, learning, leadership and advancement gives them all of the tools they need to begin to self-actualize within your company’s walls. When they reach this point, and are taking full advantage of the tools made available to them, they inspire others along the way and create a ripple effect of employee engagement.

These needs are critical for the fulfillment of a satisfying professional life and career, so how can you provide this type of environment for your employees? The first two needs are fairly simplistic – pay your employees a livable wage and don’t make them feel as if their job is on the line all the time. Have a strong organizational structure that promotes teamwork and inclusion and you can begin to fill the third need. The fourth need, importance, is where things like employee recognition come into play so strongly.

When your employees perform well, let them know it. Recognize them publicly for their accomplishments and reward them for what they’ve done. The public recognition lets the employee know their performance is important and that it matters. Incentive programs also work well here because they give employees tangible rewards for their performance. When someone receives a reward, or is able to use something like reward points to redeem for the reward item of their choice, they emotionally connect that reward to their jobs and feel important and accomplished because of it.

Self-actualization is realized because when employees feel important and recognized, they feel like they can take on more ownership of their role, and more of a leadership role within their company. This kind of employee is incredibly beneficial to the health of employee engagement because their enthusiasm and attitude actually inspire others to want to perform on their level. It’s contagious, and it works with workplace safety too!

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