“Are You In Compliance?”-“June 1, 2016 – HAZCOM And GHS, The Final Deadline”

HazCom and GHS: The Final Deadline

HazCom and GHS: The Final Deadline by Safety.BLR.com

June 1, 2016, is the final deadline in the 4-year phase-in period for OSHA’s 2012 revisions to the hazard communication standard that aligned with the Globally Harmonized System for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, or GHS. Check out the infographic for an overview of what the final deadline requires and tips to make sure your facility is prepared.

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“June 1, 2016 – HAZCOM And GHS, The Final Deadline”

HazCom and GHS: The Final Deadline

HazCom and GHS: The Final Deadline by Safety.BLR.com

June 1, 2016, is the final deadline in the 4-year phase-in period for OSHA’s 2012 revisions to the hazard communication standard that aligned with the Globally Harmonized System for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, or GHS. Check out the infographic for an overview of what the final deadline requires and tips to make sure your facility is prepared.

“Download OSHA’s New 2016 HAZCOM – SDS Guidance Manual Here”

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Download OSHA’s New 2016 HAZCOM – SDS Guidance Manual in PDF format here: https://lnkd.in/bxmuBaz

Hazard Communication Safety Data Sheets
The Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires chemical manufacturers, distributors, or importers to provide Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) (formerly known as Material Safety Data Sheets or MSDSs) to communicate the hazards of hazardous chemical products. As of June 1, 2015, the HCS will require new SDSs to be in a uniform format, and include the section numbers, the headings, and associated information under the headings below:

Section 1, Identification includes product identifier; manufacturer or distributor name, address, phone number; emergency phone number; recommended use; restrictions on use.

Section 2, Hazard(s) identification includes all hazards regarding the chemical; required label elements.

Section 3, Composition/information on ingredients includes information on chemical ingredients; trade secret claims.

Section 4, First-aid measures includes important symptoms/ effects, acute, delayed; required treatment.

Section 5, Fire-fighting measures lists suitable extinguishing techniques, equipment; chemical hazards from fire.

Section 6, Accidental release measures lists emergency procedures; protective equipment; proper methods of containment and cleanup.

Section 7, Handling and storage lists precautions for safe handling and storage, including incompatibilities.

Section 8, Exposure controls/personal protection lists OSHA’s Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs); ACGIH Threshold Limit Values (TLVs); and any other exposure limit used or recommended by the chemical manufacturer, importer, or employer preparing the SDS where available as well as appropriate engineering controls; personal protective equipment (PPE).

Section 9, Physical and chemical properties lists the chemical’s characteristics.

Section 10, Stability and reactivity lists chemical stability and possibility of hazardous reactions.

Section 11, Toxicological information includes routes of exposure; related symptoms, acute and chronic effects; numerical measures of toxicity.

Section 12, Ecological information*

Section 13, Disposal considerations*

Section 14, Transport information*

Section 15, Regulatory information*

Section 16, Other information, includes the date of preparation or last revision.

*Note: Since other Agencies regulate this information, OSHA will not be enforcing Sections 12 through 15(29 CFR 1910.1200(g)(2)).

Employers must ensure that SDSs are readily accessible to employees.
See Appendix D of 1910.1200 for a detailed description of SDS contents.

 

“GHS: What’s Next? – The Timeline For GHS Compliance Explained”

According to OSHA, GHS affects over 5 million businesses and 43 million workers in the US alone. This infographic illustrates the next steps for GHS Compliance, and gives a timeline of the evolution of GHS and it’s implementation.

GHS: What
Infographic created by Creative Safety Supply

“The OSHA SDS/GHS Hazcom Compliance Myth”

GHS SheetAfter the passage of the revised Hazcom standard in 2012, there was a great deal of confusion and misinformation generated regarding the revision from the old standard and format to the new one. This was and still is especially true for employers attempting to comply with “Employee Right to Know (Understand)” rules. By now, everybody knows about the new standardized 16 section format, the new pictograms and hazard phrases, etc. It is also commonly known that the deadline for training employees on how to read and interpret the difference between the old and new format was December 1, 2013. But what about all of the existing (m)SDS’s you have already? What do you need to do to comply with the new Hazcom rule regarding updating your collection of (m)SDS’s?

As someone who works for a company that offers (m)SDS management software, I hear over and over from our clients about the urgent need for them to update their (m)SDS binders so that they would be using the most recent “GHS compliant” version. When I asked them why they wanted to do this, every one of them said it was because they wanted to be compliant with the new GHS rule. When I asked them where they found out about the need to update their library, again almost every reply was unanimous……from a salesperson at a company who offers (m)SDS management software. OSHA compliance is serious business, but that means that there is also serious money to be made to help you maintain compliance. But how much of this is hype and what is really required?

The fact is that you must retain the newest versions of the (m)SDS as you receive them from your suppliers. Beyond that, OSHA does not require you to proactively update your existing collection, as long as your employees know and understand the difference between the new and old format. If one of your suppliers re-authors their (m)SDS into the new format, they are required by law to send you the new revision and you are required to replace the old one you already have with the new one that you received. You are not required to search for updates proactivly.

Keeping in mind that I work for a company that offers (m)SDS management software, I realize that any opinion I espouse should be met with appropriate skepticism. Therefore, please refer directly to what OSHA has said. A letter of clarification was issued on June 13, 2014 to address this issue. Here is the relevent text:

“…OSHA would not issue citations for maintenance of MSDSs when SDSs have not been received….employers may, but are not required to, contact manufacturers or distributers of products they have previously ordered to request new SDSs”.

Here is a link to the full text: OSHA letter of clarification:  http://www.m3vsoftware.com/downloads/OSHA-Letter-of-Clarification.pdf

M3V has been providing web based (m)SDS management tools since 2002. For more information about our products and services, please click:
SDS Explorer
Chemical Management Navigator
EH&S Task Manager
Ross Olsby
M3V Data Management
11925 East 65th Street
Indianapolis, IN 46236
317-823-2459
ross@m3vsoftware.com

Source: M3V Data Management:  http://www.m3vsoftware.com/News.asp

“SAFER Systems Unveils Free Chemical Emergency Response Smartphone App. With Real-Time Weather and Traffic Data”

SAFER Mobile Response on the App Store on iTunes 2014-06-26 16-27-15

SAFER Systems Unveils Free Chemical Emergency Response Smartphone App. With Real-Time Weather and Traffic Data

A must-have, “first on scene” tool for every first responder

Camarillo, CA (6/15) – SAFER Systems, the world’s leading chemical emergency response solutions provider, is proud to announce the debut of SAFER Mobile ResponseTM.  SAFER Mobile is a smartphone and tablet supported application that integrates the trusted 2012 Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG2012) with the power of Google Maps™, Google Traffic™, and live weather updates and forecasting.  The app puts crucial data at the fingertips of first responders and emergency services personnel when called to the scene of a hazardous materials incident.  The app is now available for free via iTunes or the Google Play store.

“First responders the world over recognize the ERG2012 as a trusted source for initial protective information and response guidance,” said SAFER Systems President, Allen Edmond. “We’ve taken that static, printed information and brought it to life in the more easily accessible environment of smartphones and tablets. SAFER Mobile Response converts the ERG protective distance charts into visual hazard zones and identifies key points of concern at risk using Google Maps and Google Places.”

“The app takes the widely accepted ERG2012 hazard zone guidance to the next level with real-time weather and traffic data. It will help responders plan their way to the incident scene and identify key municipal amenities at risk,” said SAFER System Vice-President of Sales and Marketing, Bob Gerow.   “SAFER Mobile Response ensures the guide’s crucial information is available, anywhere, anytime.”

SAFER Mobile ResponseTM is just one of the ways SAFER Systems continues to lead in the preparation for and mitigation of hazardous events.  For decades, the company has been one of the most trusted names in chemical facility emergency management with a growing client list that is a who’s-who of the chemical industry and response agencies.

To download SAFER Mobile Response™ visit www.safersystem.com, play.google.com, or itunes.apple.com.  For more information visit www.safersystem.com.

About SAFER Systems: SAFER Systems is the leader in chemical emergency response solutions. For more than 30 years, its software has been used by the leading chemical facilities around the globe to assist in preparedness for and mitigation of chemical emergencies.  Among the more than 600 clients of SAFER are Agrium, Bayer, BP, DuPont, Dow Chemical, Dow Corning, ExxonMobil, Honeywell, Monsanto, OxyChem, PCS and Shell as well as leading transportation companies such as BNSF, CSX, Union Pacific, Norfolk Southern, CN Rail and Canadian Pacific Railway.   SAFER’s real-time, consequence assessment software has won numerous awards and is the only product of its kind to use full weather station and gas sensor data with patented algorithms that support source location and release rate estimation.  For more information, visit www.safersystem.com.

Google Maps™ and Google Traffic™ are properties of Google.

OSHA Publishes Direct Final Rule On Standards Update To Rules On Signage

Understanding OSHA’s Safety Sign Standards Update

For decades, OSHA’s regulations for workplace safety signs were based on outdated formats that were not aligned with the latest safety communication standards and their state-of-the-art warnings technology. These sign and tag regulations had not been updated since their inception in 1971, which referenced the 1967 and 1968 versions of the USASI Z53 and Z35 standards. But, in September 2013, new OSHA regulations went into effect. OSHA updated its regulations to incorporate the latest ANSI Z535 (2011) standards, effective September 11, 2013. This regulation change is an opportunity for organizations to rethink and elevate visual safety communication in the workplace.

Clarion’s Role in Championing the Latest Advances in Visual Safety

Clarion’s CEO, Geoffrey Peckham, who also serves as chair of the ANSI Z535 Committee for Safety Signs and Colors and chair and delegation head for ANSI to the ISO standards pertaining to safety signs, has spearheaded this update to OSHA’s consensus standards. His goal has been to better align OSHA with the latest advances in safety sign technology. Read our Issue Brief to learn more.

What This Means For Workplace Safety Signs and Tags

With OSHA’s regulatory update, organizations can now utilize the advances in warnings technology established in the ANSI Z535 standards for facility safety signs and tags – and be in compliance with OSHA. Prior to the rule change, facility owners using ANSI Z535 signs or tags would run the risk of being cited for violating OSHA standards because the OSHA standards only referenced the old 1967-68 standards (called a “de minimus situation”). This rule update allows employers to use either the old or new standards. For existing signage, OSHA will grandfather signs that comply with its current requirements. For new signage, OSHA will allow use of safety signs and tags that are compliant with either the old or new USASI/ANSI standards.

Why the New Standards Are Better

Most safety signs and tags in use today are based on antiquated, 70-year-old designs that lack the warnings technology incorporated into modern safety sign standards. They also fail to meet the demands of an increasingly global workforce with multiple language needs. The 2011 ANSI Z535 standards have many safety communication benefits as compared with older versions. These standards incorporate the past 70+ years of advances that have taken place in safety sign technology. As such, their use in workplaces is a significant step forward in improving safety and better protecting workers of all backgrounds.

Benefits of Using the Latest ANSI Z535 Signs and Tags
  • The new signs and tags typically provide a more substantial level of information so people can make safer decisions (such as the nature of the hazard, the consequence of interaction with the hazard, and how to avoid the hazard).
  • The concepts contained in the ANSI Z535 standards are supported by human factors research on effective warnings and by modern risk assessment methodologies.
  • The newer formats better accommodate multiple language panels and graphical symbol panels so safety is better communicated to non-English readers.
  • The ANSI Z535 standards contain design principles that exemplify current legal criteria for “adequate warnings” as defined by the past thirty years of U.S. case law.
  • See Updated Information here:
  • http://www.clarionsafety.com/OSHA-Signage-Update

__________________________________

Clarion Safety Systems, a longstanding leader in advancing best practices in visual safety communication, announced today that its efforts to promote the use of industry best practices related to safety signs, colors and tags to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has resulted in the agency issuing a Direct Final Rule (DFR) on a proposed update to its regulations on signage. If no significant adverse public comments on the DFR are received by July 15, 2013, the agency’s next step will be to confirm the effective date of the rule.

Clarion’s CEO, Geoffrey Peckham, who also serves as chair of the ANSI Z535 Committee for Safety Signs and Colors and chair and delegation head for ANSI to the ISO standards pertaining to safety signs, has championed this update to OSHA’s standards to better align with the latest advances in safety sign technology. Over the last four years, together with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, Peckham has lobbied OSHA to recognize that the American National Standards Institute’s ANSI Z535 series of standards for safety colors, signs and tags provide an equal or greater level of safety as compared to the 1967-68 USASI Z53 and Z35 standards that are presently referenced in OSHA’s regulations.

“At Clarion, workers’ lives and livelihoods matter. In our view, OSHA’s proposed update marks a significant step towards advancing workplace safety with effective signage,” says Deb Patterson, President of Clarion Safety Systems. “Our comprehensive knowledge of the latest standards coupled with our practical experience applying them across industries brings our clients best practice products. We know that there’s a better way to warn than what’s present in most workplaces around the country. It’s why we have been such strong advocates of OSHA’s adoption of the ANSI Z535 standards; safety signage, when done well, reduces risk and protects people.”

According to OSHA, the goal of the safety sign rulemaking update is to improve workplace safety and health by allowing employers to use the latest consensus safety sign standards (ANSI Z535) in order to take advantage of the safety communication benefits that the newer standards represent. When compared to the older 1967-1968 standards, the ANSI Z535 standards are considered the state-of-the-art because they have the following characteristics:

  • Provide critical information viewers need in order to make safe decisions, such as the nature of the hazard, the consequence of interaction with the hazard, and how to avoid the hazard
  • Are supported by human factors research on effective warnings and by modern risk assessment methodologies for accurately communicating hazard severity
  • Have the ability to use multiple language panels and graphical symbol panels to communicate safety to non-English speaking workers
  • Meet current legal criteria for “adequate warnings” as defined by the past thirty years of U.S. case law

Most employers currently use signs that comply with the older 1967-1968 standards. Because OSHA aimed to avoid creating an economic burden to employers, the older 1967-1968 standards will continue to be referenced in OSHA’s regulations. However, the corresponding ANSI Z535-2011 reference will be placed next to the older reference. For instance, whenever the OSHA standards reference the 1968 USASI Z35.1 Standard for Accident Prevention Signs, the 2011 ANSI Z535.2 Standard for Environmental and Facility Safety Signs will also be referenced. In effect, this will allow employers to use safety signs that comply with either the old or the new standards.

Prior to this rule change, employers using the newer ANSI Z535 standards for their signage would run the risk of being cited for violating OSHA standards. The outcome of this violation would not result in a fine due to the fact that the ANSI Z535 standards are the current version of the document that was used as the basis for OSHA’s safety sign regulations. Called a “de minimus situation,” this provision provides little incentive for employers to adopt the latest industry best practices with regards to safety signs, colors and tags. The new rule that incorporates ANSI Z535 safety sign, color and tag references into OSHA standards eliminates this problem, allowing employers to use the ANSI Z535 standards without the possibility of a citation.

“OSHA’s commitment to uphold the advances that have taken place in safety sign technology is a step forward in improving safety, reducing compliance uncertainty, and better protecting workers of all backgrounds,” says Peckham. “This is an opportunity for organizations to elevate visual safety communication in their workplaces. Safety and risk-conscious companies understand that, when it comes to zero harm and accident prevention, your workers, your company and your industry will be best served by utilizing the advances in warnings technology established in the ANSI Z535 standards. Industry leaders who already have a strong culture can now utilize signage that reflects their values in their facilities – and be in compliance with OSHA.”

To help safety advocates to learn more about the ANSI standards, as part of its comprehensive library of short, educational videos designed to promote a better understanding of current best practices in product safety labeling and facility sign systems, Clarion has produced a video titled, “ANSI Standards in Safety Signs and Labels.” The video is available through the Clarion website’s video library as well as through the company’s YouTube channel.

Clarion specializes in bringing companies up-to-date with the latest warnings technology and produces a product line of best practice, standards-compliant facility safety sign systems. Additional information is available by contacting the company or visiting http://www.clarionsafety.com.

ABOUT CLARION SAFETY SYSTEMS
Clarion Safety Systems, LLC, is the leading designer and manufacturer of visual safety solutions that help customers in more than 180 industries worldwide to make their products and premises safer. Clarion offers a full range of standard and custom products including machinery safety labels, environmental and facility safety signs, pipe and valve identification markings, lockout/tagout products, and safety-grade photoluminescent egress path-marking escape systems. Founded in 1990, the company continues to play a leading role in the development and writing of international and national standards for safety signs, labels, and markings. Clarion is headquartered at 190 Old Milford Road in Milford, PA, 18337, and online at http://www.clarionsafety.com.

Clarion CEO Geoffrey Peckham’s ongoing leadership efforts in bolstering adoption by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of the Updated American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) Standards leads to direct final rule on Consensus Standard Update on Signage, Marking Important Advancement in Workplace Safety.

Can You Answer These 20 Questions About the New GHS Standard?

Great For Use as a Tool Box Talk!

Ready for the new GHS-required safety data sheet (SDS)? Here’s a little game of 20 questions to test your knowledge of the new SDS. Use the quiz to check supervisors’ understanding of the new format as well.

Although you still have over a year to train employees about the new GHS-required SDS and even more time before you have to replace the MSDS with the SDS, it’s a never too early to start getting your workplace ready for the change over.

In this quiz, you’ll be asked to identify sections of the SDS where specific information can be found. If you’re already using the ANSI-format MSDS, you should get all the answers right. Scroll down after the last question to check your answers.

1. What is the compliance deadline (month, day, and year) for training employees on the new SDS?

2. By what date must you switch over from the MSDS to the SDS?

3. In which section of the SDS would you find information about a chemical’s vapor density?

4. In which section would you find the CAS number for a hazardous chemical?

5. In which section would you find the chemical manufacturer’s or importer’s name, address, and an emergency phone number?

6. In which section would you find the UN number and proper shipping name, required for transporting chemicals?

7. In which section would you find information about the ecotoxicity and bioaccumulative potential of a hazardous chemical?

8. In which section would you find the signal word, hazard statement, symbol, and precautionary statement (corresponding to information on the label)?

9. In which section would you find a list of safety, health, and environmental regulations that apply to the product?

10. In which section would you find information about safe disposal of waste chemicals and contaminated packaging?

11.    In which section would you find information about first aid for exposures?

12.    In which section would you find about PPE required for handling the chemical?

13.    In which section would you find out how to fight a fire involving the chemical?

14.    In which section would you find about possible hazardous reactions involving the chemical and conditions to avoid?

15.    In which section would you find the flash point of a chemical?

16.    In which section would you find routes of exposure and symptoms of exposure?

17.    In which section would you find safe handling and storage procedures?

18.    In which section would you find information about necessary engineering controls?

19.    In which section would you learn how to handling a spill involving the chemical?

20.    In which section would you learn about other materials that are incompatible with a chemical, possibly causing a hazardous reaction if the materials are not segregated?

11.    In which section would you find information about first aid for exposures?

12.    In which section would you find about PPE required for handling the chemical?

13.    In which section would you find out how to fight a fire involving the chemical?

14.    In which section would you find about possible hazardous reactions involving the chemical and conditions to avoid?

15.    In which section would you find the flash point of a chemical?

16.    In which section would you find routes of exposure and symptoms of exposure?

17.    In which section would you find safe handling and storage procedures?

18.    In which section would you find information about necessary engineering controls?

19.    In which section would you learn how to handling a spill involving the chemical?

20.    In which section would you learn about other materials that are incompatible with a chemical, possibly causing a hazardous reaction if the materials are not segregated?

– See more at: http://safetydailyadvisor.blr.com/2012/10/can-you-answer-these-questions-about-the-sds/#sthash.Ilxu1XUE.dpuf

11.    In which section would you find information about first aid for exposures?

12.    In which section would you find about PPE required for handling the chemical?

13.    In which section would you find out how to fight a fire involving the chemical?

14.    In which section would you find about possible hazardous reactions involving the chemical and conditions to avoid?

15.    In which section would you find the flash point of a chemical?

16.    In which section would you find routes of exposure and symptoms of exposure?

17.    In which section would you find safe handling and storage procedures?

18.    In which section would you find information about necessary engineering controls?

19.    In which section would you learn how to handling a spill involving the chemical?

20.    In which section would you learn about other materials that are incompatible with a chemical, possibly causing a hazardous reaction if the materials are not segregated?

– See more at: http://safetydailyadvisor.blr.com/2012/10/can-you-answer-these-questions-about-the-sds/#sthash.Ilxu1XUE.dpuf

Answers

1. December 1, 2013
2. June 1, 2015
3. Section 9, Physical and Chemical Properties
4. Section 3, Composition/Information on Ingredients
5. Section 1, Identification
6. Section 14, Transportation Information
7. Section 12, Ecological Information
8. Section 2, Hazard Identification
9. Section 15, Regulatory Information
10. Section 13, Disposal Considerations
11. Section 4, First Aid
12. Section 8, Exposure Controls/Personal Protection
13. Section 5, Fire-fighting Measures
14. Section 10, Stability and Reactivity
15. Section 9, Physical and Chemical Properties
16. Section 11, Toxicological Information
17. Section 7, Handling and Storage
18. Section 8, Exposure Control/Personal Protection
19. Section 6, Accidental Release Measures
20. Section 10, Stability and Reactivity

 

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GHS Infographic: “Did Your Training Meet The December 1, 2013 Deadline?

In 2012, OSHA revised its Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) to align with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System for the Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, or GHS. With the first compliance deadline for the GHS revisions just around the corner, are you prepared? Have you trained your employees on the new label elements and safety data sheets (SDSs) that will be required once GHS is fully implemented?

If you haven’t yet done so, you must complete this training ASAP!  Check out the infographic below to learn more about who must be trained, what training must include, and what the GHS revisions mean for you and your employees.

GHS Training Guide

GHS training: Are you ready for the December 1 deadline? by Safety.BLR.com

Is Your 1st Phase of GHS Training Done? – What’s Next?

Is your December 1, 2013 first phase of GHS Training complete? Here’s Whats Next!

Hazard Communication and GHS: What comes next?

Hazard Communication and GHS: What Comes Next? by Safety.BLR.com

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