Advertisements

“House Fires Caused By Storage of 9 Volt, AA Batteries In Junk Drawers & Other Places Rising”

* If You Know of a Fire Incident in Your Town Caused by 9 Volt, AA or AAA Battery Storage in a Home, Please Note it in the comments Section of this Post! Thank You!

Click here for the recent Hastings, Nebraska House Fire on January 16, 2017

If you are storing loose 9 volt or AA or other batteries in a kitchen drawer or a “junk” drawer in your home, watch how you store them. Above all don’t store them loose and rolling around with other metal items, like small tools, paper clips, nails and more of the lovely mix of things we keep in our junk drawers. You also don’t want them loose and rolling around in other items like a camera case, luggage, etc.

All you need to have happened is for a metal object like steel wool or a paper clip short out across the top of a 9-volt battery and ignite paper or other easily ignited materials and you’ll have a potential disaster in your home. As indicated in the YouTube Video below, it doesn’t take much to heat a metallic object or cause a spark in order to start a fire. *Please Do Not Do This At Home*

What to do with a 9 Volt Battery

I teach safety to the public, common sense tells most of us what to do in situations that could become life threatening. I speak to 50-60 people at a time about fire safety in the home on a monthly basis. I get the same reaction from every group when I hold up a 9-volt battery and announce that it is a fire hazard and it could burn down your house.

They all kinda look at me funny, as if to ask, “Did you just say a 9-volt battery could burn down my house?” That look is almost comical.

Q: Where do you store your batteries?

A: Throw them in  in a “junk” drawer

I then hold up a brillo pad. (just one example)

Q: What do you do with the batteries when you are done with them?

A: Throw them in the trash.

A 9-volt battery (see video) is a fire hazard because the positive and negative posts are on top, right next to one another. If this comes in contact with anything metal (aluminum foil, brillo, etc…) it will spark, and if there is a fuel for this spark you will have a fire. (fire needs heat, fuel and oxygen to burn) To test this theory, put a 9-volt battery or a couple of AA batteries in your pocket with some loose change or your key chain full of keys, (use common sense) this will bring on a whole new meaning to the words, Hot Pants.

When you dispose of this type of battery (positive and negative on top) Make sure it is safely wrapped in electrical tape or something to keep it separated from anything else that may come in contact with it. A small box or zip lock bag if kept in a junk drawer should suffice.  I have seen in some stores now that the manufacturers are now packaging them with plastic caps. If you need to purchase a 9-volt battery try to find those that are packaged in this manner.

Try to be just as diligent with AA or AAA batteries. Keep them in their original packaging if stored in a “junk drawer”. Don’t let them roll around freely with all the other wonderful miscellaneous items we unknowingly toss in the drawer and don’t think twice about it.

 

untitled-design

Advertisements

“AA Batteries Cause House Fire In Hastings, Nebraska” & How To Store Batteries Safely In The Home” #FireSafety

AA Batteries Rolling Around In Camera Case Cause House Fire In Hastings, Nebraska

“How To Store Batteries Safely In The Home”

HASTINGS, Neb. (KSNB) — Some of us may have that kitchen junk drawer that has loose batteries, tools, and other items in it, but these drawers might be a fire waiting to happen. If batteries touch in the wrong way, they might catch fire and cause a lot of damage.

“Don’t let them just roll in there,” Big G Ace Hardware Store Manager Linda Dill said. “Don’t let them roll against the screwdriver, because it can just transfer onto another battery or something down the line. The best thing to do is to store them upright and somehow covered.”

Fire officials said not only 9-volt batteries but other typs as well, contribute to rising cause of home fires in the last 4-5 years due to inappropriate storage of all household batteries in the home.

“You’d see them in many homes, but the positive and negative end of that battery are both very close,” Chief Kent Gilbert with the Hastings Fire Department said. “It’s easy for those to be shorted accidentally. It’s important to remember that it will create enough heat to cause a fire.”

Putting masking tape on batteries is one way to prevent them from touching. Plastic bags are another way.

“Putting them in plastic bags with all the negatives up, all the positives up, or however you want to do that,” Dill said. “Make sure they’re tight, so they don’t roll around in that.”

Officials said when people are done using the batteries they should get rid of them immediately to help ensure safety.

It’s recommended that people keep the original packing of the batteries and leave them in there until they are ready to use them.

screenshot-www-graphiq-com-2016-12-28-17-56-24

See exact data here on fire loss in deaths, dollar loss, and injuries: http://bit.ly/2hunDks

Safety Comics Of The Day – Santa Style 2016 – Have a Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays! #HolidaySafety

Safety Santa

Safety Santa

OSHAregs

 

image0012

santa_chimney_safety_cartoon8215

image002

1 ChristmasMerry Christmas To All & Thank You For Visiting My Blog in 2016!

 Jack Benton, Chicago South Suburbs, Illinois – EHS Safety News America® 2016

Wish List: Chicago Area EHS -Safety  & Loss Control – Risk  Job Leads Welcomed! @USASafetyNews – DM Me!

“Winter Holiday Safety Tips” #HomeSafety #HolidaySafety #NFPA

projectholidaybanner16

NFPA provides a wealth of safety information to help ensure the holiday season is a safe one.

Festive celebrations, flickering lights and winter greens are hallmarks of the holiday season, but they also present fire risks that can quickly turn this festive time of year into a devastating one. NFPA’s Project Holiday campaign works to educate the public about potential fire risks during the holidays, offering tip sheets, videos, and other resources to help everyone safely enjoy the season.

Winter holiday fires by the numbers
  • Electrical distribution or lighting equipment was involved in 35% of home Christmas tree fires.
  • One-fifth (20%) of the decoration fires started in the kitchen. One out of six (17%) started in the living room, family room or den.
  • The top three days for home candle fires were Christmas, New Year’s Day, and Christmas Eve.
  • See more statistics on winter holiday fires.
Christmas tree & decoration fires

Carefully decorating your home can help make your holidays safer. Between 2009-2014, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 210 home fires that started with Christmas trees per year. U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated average of 860 home structure fires per year that began with decorations, excluding Christmas trees.

In the throes of holiday shopping and decorating? Check out the 9 Ways You’re a Holiday Decorating Disaster.

It’s time to deck the halls, but follow NFPA’s simple safety tips to help keep yourself and your family and friends safer from fire.

NFPA’s lovable Dan Doofus shows you how to have a fire-safe holiday with a few simple safety tips.

Holiday cooking

In 2014, the three leading dates for home structure fires caused by cooking were: Thanksgiving, Christmas day and Christmas Eve.That’s why it’s important to know what you can do to help keep your friends and family safe while entertaining for the holidays. Also, read NFPA’s blog post on Martha Stewart’s website – 8 Simple Fire Safety Tips We all Need to Follow This Holiday Season.

SparkyHolidayColoringPageFor kids and families

The holidays are a time for families and friends to gather. Whether you are looking for coloring pages, activity sheets or e-cards, we have what you need to keep you fire-safe this holiday season.

For the fire service

If you’re a member of the fire service, NFPA provides templates, talking points and other great resources to help you build a comprehensive holiday safety campaign for your community.

Put a Freeze on Winter Fires campaign
Put A Freeze on Winter Fires logo
NFPA and USFA team up each year for the “Put A Freeze on Winter Fires” campaign to remind you that the winter months are the leading time of year for home fires. To help you stay safe, we’re providing a wealth of safety tips and information on cooking, heating, candles and holiday decorating – factors that contribute to the increased risk of home fires in the months ahead.

 

 

“FDA Issues Final Rule On Safety And Effectiveness Of Antibacterial Soaps”

goldantibact

Rule removes triclosan and triclocarban from over-the-counter antibacterial hand and body washes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued a final rule establishing that over-the-counter (OTC) consumer antiseptic wash products containing certain active ingredients can no longer be marketed. Companies will no longer be able to market antibacterial washes with these ingredients because manufacturers did not demonstrate that the ingredients are both safe for long-term daily use and more effective than plain soap and water in preventing illness and the spread of certain infections. Some manufacturers have already started removing these ingredients from their products.

This final rule applies to consumer antiseptic wash products containing one or more of 19 specific active ingredients, including the most commonly used ingredients – triclosan and triclocarban. These products are intended for use with water, and are rinsed off after use. This rule does not affect consumer hand “sanitizers” or wipes, or antibacterial products used in health care settings.

“Consumers may think antibacterial washes are more effective at preventing the spread of germs, but we have no scientific evidence that they are any better than plain soap and water,” said Janet Woodcock, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). “In fact, some data suggests that antibacterial ingredients may do more harm than good over the long-term.”

The agency issued a proposed rule in 2013 after some data suggested that long-term exposure to certain active ingredients used in antibacterial products — for example, triclosan (liquid soaps) and triclocarban (bar soaps) — could pose health risks, such as bacterial resistance or hormonal effects. Under the proposed rule, manufacturers were required to provide the agency with additional data on the safety and effectiveness of certain ingredients used in over-the-counter consumer antibacterial washes if they wanted to continue marketing antibacterial products containing those ingredients. This included data from clinical studies demonstrating that these products were superior to non-antibacterial washes in preventing human illness or reducing infection.

Antibacterial hand and body wash manufacturers did not provide the necessary data to establish safety and effectiveness for the 19 active ingredients addressed in this final rulemaking. For these ingredients, either no additional data were submitted or the data and information that were submitted were not sufficient for the agency to find that these ingredients are Generally Recognized as Safe and Effective (GRAS/GRAE). In response to comments submitted by industry, the FDA has deferred rulemaking for one year on three additional ingredients used in consumer wash products – benzalkonium chloridebenzethonium chloride andchloroxylenol (PCMX) – to allow for the development and submission of new safety and effectiveness data for these ingredients. Consumer antibacterial washes containing these specific ingredients may be marketed during this time while data are being collected.

Washing with plain soap and running water remains one of the most important steps consumers can take to avoid getting sick and to prevent spreading germs to others. If soap and water are not available and a consumer uses hand sanitizer instead, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendsthat it be an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol.

Since the FDA’s proposed rulemaking in 2013, manufacturers already started phasing out the use of certain active ingredients in antibacterial washes, including triclosan and triclocarban. Manufacturers will have one year to comply with the rulemaking by removing products from the market or reformulating (removing antibacterial active ingredients) these products.

“CPSC, NFL Star Team Up on New 2016 July 4th Fireworks Safety Video”

WASHINGTON, D.C. – At a fireworks safety event today on the National Mall, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Chairman Elliot F. Kaye unveiled a new public service announcement (PSA) featuring New York Giants defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul. Pierre-Paul suffered a severe hand injury on July 4, 2015, from a firework-related incident at his home. In the new PSA, Pierre-Paul and Chairman Kaye deliver a powerful message about the importance of children never handling fireworks, all consumers staying away from professional-grade fireworks and safely using consumer fireworks.

While Pierre-Paul was attempting to relight a firework, the device exploded in his hand before he could react. He lost an index finger and part of his thumb, and was required to have reconstructive surgery to save his middle finger. Since the tragic incident, Pierre-Paul has pledged to warn others about fireworks dangers. Because 70 percent of all injuries with fireworks occur during the 30 days surrounding July 4th, CPSC and Pierre-Paul are teaming up to get the message out before, during and after the holiday.

“Anyone doubting the danger fireworks can pose need only look at JPP’s hand and listen to his story,” said Chairman Kaye.  “JPP’s personal experience and connection with fans and families nationwide will bring much needed attention to these dangers and, ultimately, help prevent deaths and injuries from fireworks. CPSC has new data indicating that there were 11 deaths and nearly 12,000 ER-treated injuries from fireworks in 2015–the highest number in 15 years.  With more states relaxing their laws and allowing more types of fireworks to be purchased and used by consumers, we need to do more to prevent kids and adults from being rushed to the hospital like JPP experienced.”

In CPSC’s new fireworks report, 9 of the 11 deaths involved reloadable aerial devices, a professional grade fireworks device that can quickly result in tragedy, when used incorrectly. In 2015, the deadliest fireworks incidents most often involved males older than 20. Young adults between the ages of 15 and 19 accounted for the highest rate of injuries, followed by children 5 to 9 years of age. About 65 percent of all injuries involved burns from devices such as sparklers, bottle rockets and firecrackers.

Consumers who decide to purchase consumer fireworks are urged to follow these safety steps:

  • Make sure consumer fireworks are legal in your area before buying or using them. (View Fact Sheet)
  • Never use or make professional grade fireworks.
  • Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks, including sparklers. Sparklers burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees°F─hot enough to melt some metals.
  • Do not buy fireworks that are packaged in brown paper, which is often a sign that the fireworks were made for professional displays.
  • Never place any part of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse. Move to a safe distance immediately after lighting fireworks.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy, in case of fire or other mishap.
  • Never try to relight or handle malfunctioning fireworks. Soak them with water and throw them away.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Light fireworks one at a time, then move away from them quickly.
  • After fireworks complete their burning, douse the spent device with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before discarding the device to prevent a trash fire.

Fireworks Information Center

Fireworks Injuries

fireworks injury infographicFireworks are synonymous with our celebration of Independence Day. Yet, the thrill of fireworks can also bring pain. 230 people on average go the emergency room every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month around the July 4th holiday.

“OSHA Announces Safety Stand-Down at Worksites Throughout Southeast (Region 4) To Emphasize Response To, Prevention Of Heat-Related Illnesses, Injuries”

Firefox_Screenshot_2016-06-02T00-32-37.584ZU.S. Department of Labor | June 23, 2016

Trade News Release Banner Image

OSHA announces Safety Stand-Down at worksites throughout Southeast
to emphasize response to, prevention of heat-related illnesses, injuries
Thousands of workers overcome by heat illness annually, OSHA reports

ATLANTA – In 2014, 2,630 workers suffered from heat illness while 18 died from heat stroke and related causes on the job – all of which was preventable.

To raise awareness about these dangers, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, employers and trade associations will conduct a one-hour Safety Stand-Down at construction sites and workplaces in eight Southern states from June 27 to July 1, 2016.

Workers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee will stop work voluntarily for one hour at 7 a.m. EDT to conduct safety training focused on how to recognize the symptoms of heat-related illnesses and prevent these illnesses when working in hot weather.

Every year, thousands of workers nationwide suffer from serious heat-related illnesses. OSHA investigations of recent heat-related deaths found a majority involved workers on the job for three or less days – highlighting the need for employers to ensure that new workers become acclimated to the heat when starting or returning to work. Labor-intensive activities in hot weather can increase body temperatures beyond a level that sweating cannot cool normally. Heat illness may manifest initially as heat rash or heat cramps. The illness can quickly elevate to heat exhaustion and then heat stroke without simple prevention steps.

“People who work outdoors in extreme hot weather – in industries such as agriculture, construction, baggage-handling, roofing and landscaping – must be aware of the dangers,” said Kurt Petermeyer, OSHA’s regional administrator for the Southeast. “Employers are responsible for protecting workers from illness or injury when temperatures increase. This safety Stand-Down initiative seeks to educate employers and workers alike. We encourage companies throughout the region to participate.”

For the summer season, OSHA offers tools to assist employers and workers:

  • Heat-illness educational materials in English and Spanish, and a curriculum to be used for workplace training.
  • Online tools such as OSHA worker heat safety tips in a blog, Twitter posts, and at an newly updated heat campaign web page that now includes illustrations of heat exhaustion and heat stroke, an animated video, training resources, and links to an updated heat safety phone app.
  • #WaterRestShade, the official hashtag of the campaign, encourages employers to provide their workers with drinking water, ample breaks, and a shaded area while working outdoors.
  • OSHA continues to work with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to raise awareness on the dangers of working in the heat through its Weather-Ready Nation campaign.

Employers from all states can register for the Stand-Down event at the Associated General Contractors of America Inc. Georgia branch’s website. An informational flyer and toolbox, in English and Spanish, are also available there.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

# # #

Media Contacts:

Michael D’Aquino, 678-237-0630, daquino.michael@dol.gov

Release Number: 16-1177-ATL (170)

“It’s That Time of Year For Tornado Safety Training – “Are You Ready?”

Frightening video of the Destructive Tornado in Tuscaloosa – Alabama 4-27-2011

Tornados are nature’s violent storms that appear suddenly and without warning. Tornadoes can strike anywhere at anytime, therefore, you need to be ready, know the drill and act quickly.

Download this Red Cross®  : Tornado Safety – Red Cross .pdf information booklet!

Know the Difference – What is a Tornado Watch? What is a Tornado Warning?

To identify the hazard level and what actions you should take, become familiar with the terms Tornado Watch vs. Tornado Warning.

Tornado Watch indicates conditions are favorable for a tornado and a tornado is possible.

Tornado Warning indicates that a tornado has been sighted or seen by the National Weather Service Doppler Radar and may be headed your way. TAKE COVER IMMEDIATELY!

Preparing for a Tornado – Does your family have a Tornado Plan?

Develop a safety plan for home, work, school and when outdoors. In buildings where your family spends time, know where the designated shelters are located. Make sure your family reviews and practices the plan at least once a year and especially on days when severe weather is forecast for your area. If you or a family member are disabled, develop an alternative plan and be sure to include items in your supply kit that will meet their special needs for at least a week or longer. Download “How To Prepare For A Tornado” PDF Guidebook Here:  http://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/1409003506195-52740fd2983079a211d041f7aea6b85d/how_to_prepare_tornado_033014_508.pdf

Open buildings (shopping malls, gymnasiums or civic centers)
• Try to get into the restroom or an interior hallway. If there is no time to go anywhere else, seek shelter right where you are. Try to get up against something that will support or deflect falling debris. Protect your head by covering it with your arms.

Automobiles

• NEVER try to outrun a tornado. Get out of your vehicle and try to find shelter inside a sturdy building. A culvert or ditch can provide shelter if a substantial building is not nearby – lie down flat and cover your head with your hands. DO NOT take shelter under a highway overpass or bridge. Debris could get blown underneath the structure or the structure could be destroyed.

Outdoors

• Try to find shelter immediately in the nearest substantial building. If no buildings are close, lie down flat in a ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands.

Mobile homes

• DO NOT stay in a mobile home. You should leave immediately and seek shelter inside a nearby sturdy building or lie down in a ditch away from your home, covering your head with your hands. Mobile homes are extremely unsafe during tornadoes.

“New Safety Product Spotlight” – “Ladder Lab – Making an Impact in On the Job Injuries”

screenshot-www ladderlab com 2016-04-11 12-48-33

Cincinnati, Ohio–April 4, 2016—The construction industry is one of the most injurious professions in the United States. This industry’s injury figures are higher than police officers and other first responders.  Ladder related injuries are some of the most common within this profession.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 50% of all ladder related injuries occur when an individual attempts to bring tools with them on the ladder.  Ladder Lab was designed to prevent on the job injuries by creating a method for handymen and construction workers to lift their tools to the top of a ladder easily.  No more injuries!

“As industry professionals ourselves we knew the dangers and developed the Ladder Lab with safety in mind,” says Bernadette Cieslak “People will use tool belts to a degree but sometimes they just don’t cut it.  This is an easier way to carry more tools, and to carry them safely.  A tool belt still isn’t safe over time because it adds to back stress and doesn’t allow for even weight distribution.”

Ladder Lab is a specially designed pulley system with a self-locking ratchet that allows the handyman to hoist a tool bag up an extension ladder to a desired height.  This system enables the handyman to retrieve tools, paint, and other supplies easily and safely.  By using the system the worker is now able to safely and properly climb an extension ladder using both hands.  Not only does this protect the worker on the ladder from injury but also his investment in tools because there is no danger of them falling from the tool bag.

Ladder Lab is an affordable solution and a great investment for home renovation companies that would like to save on the cost of potential litigation and workman’s comp claims.

For more information on how to purchase Ladder Lab visit: www.ladderlab.com

“The 12 Days of Christmas Safety”

%d bloggers like this: