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“Why Lock-Out, Tag-Out IS Vitally Important” #LOTO #Safety

Caution: Somewhat Graphic Photo – Note: This Photo is the property of Jack Benton, and may not be used without written consent!

Why LOTO is Vitally Important 3

Why LOTO is Vitally Important 

Note: The photo above is not intended for page views or shock value as I don’t believe that those methods truly teach you anything in and of themselves. I don’t know the particulars of the above accident, but I do know that the lack of a proper lock out – tag out (control of hazardous energy) policy and procedure contributed to the accident.

This is always on OSHA’s Top 10 Violations list on a yearly basis, typically coming in at number 2 each year in the total number of times cited. Please use the training information below to keep your employees safe and involved in this process at your workplace.

Remember to AUDIT your procedures more than once per year. LOTO can be a difficult procedure especially when your job or facility has large manufacturing equipment such as a multi-employee operated mile long paper mill versus many single employee operated machines.

Hopefully, the Temp Worker Without LOTO Training who lost his life on the first day of his new job and the LOTO Webinar below, as well as the other resources further down the page will help you to put together an appropriate LOTO policy and procedure for your company.

Ninety minutes into his first day on the first job of his life, Day Davis was called over to help at Palletizer No. 4 at the Bacardi bottling plant in Jacksonville, Fla. What happened next is an all-too-common story for temp workers working in blue-collar industries. Read the investigation: http://www.propublica.org/article/tem..

The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) Full Webinar 2016

What is hazardous energy?

Energy sources including electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or other sources in machines and equipment can be hazardous to workers. During the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment, the unexpected startup or release of stored energy can result in serious injury or death to workers.

What are the harmful effects of hazardous energy?

Workers servicing or maintaining machines or equipment may be seriously injured or killed if hazardous energy is not properly controlled. Injuries resulting from the failure to control hazardous energy during maintenance activities can be serious or fatal! Injuries may include electrocution, burns, crushing, cutting, lacerating, amputating, or fracturing body parts, and others.

  • A steam valve is automatically turned on burning workers who are repairing a downstream connection in the piping.
  • A jammed conveyor system suddenly releases, crushing a worker who is trying to clear the jam.
  • Internal wiring on a piece of factory equipment electrically shorts, shocking worker who is repairing the equipment.

Craft workers, electricians, machine operators, and laborers are among the 3 million workers who service equipment routinely and face the greatest risk of injury. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation.

What can be done to control hazardous energy?

Failure to control hazardous energy accounts for nearly 10 percent of the serious accidents in many industries. Proper lockout/tagout (LOTO) practices and procedures safeguard workers from hazardous energy releases. OSHA’s Lockout/Tagout Fact Sheet* describes the practices and procedures necessary to disable machinery or equipment to prevent hazardous energy release. The OSHA standard for The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) (29 CFR 1910.147) for general industry outlines measures for controlling different types of hazardous energy. The LOTO standard establishes the employer’s responsibility to protect workers from hazardous energy. Employers are also required to train each worker to ensure that they know, understand, and are able to follow the applicable provisions of the hazardous energy control procedures:

  • Proper lockout/tagout (LOTO) practices and procedures safeguard workers from the release of hazardous energy. The OSHA standard for The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) (29 CFR 1910.147) for general industry, outlines specific action and procedures for addressing and controlling hazardous energy during servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment. Employers are also required to train each worker to ensure that they know, understand, and are able to follow the applicable provisions of the hazardous energy control procedures. Workers must be trained in the purpose and function of the energy control program and have the knowledge and skills required for the safe application, usage and removal of the energy control devices.
  • All employees who work in an area where energy control procedure(s) are utilized need to be instructed in the purpose and use of the energy control procedure(s), especially prohibition against attempting to restart or reenergize machines or other equipment that are locked or tagged out.
  • All employees who are authorized to lockout machines or equipment and perform the service and maintenance operations need to be trained in recognition of applicable hazardous energy sources in the workplace, the type and magnitude of energy found in the workplace, and the means and methods of isolating and/or controlling the energy.
  • Specific procedures and limitations relating to tagout systems where they are allowed.
  • Retraining of all employees to maintain proficiency or introduce new or changed control methods.

OSHA’s Lockout/Tagout Fact Sheet* describes the practices and procedures necessary to disable machinery or equipment to prevent the release of hazardous energy.

The control of hazardous energy is also addressed in a number of other OSHA standards, including Marine Terminals (1917 Subpart C), Safety and Health Regulations for Longshoring (1918 Subpart G), Safety and Health Regulations for Construction; Electrical (1926 Subpart K), Concrete and Masonry Construction (1926 Subpart Q), Electric Power Transmission and Distribution (1926 Subpart V), and General Industry; Electrical (1910 Subpart S), Special Industries (1910 Subpart R), and Electric Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution (1910.269).

Highlights
  • Lockout-Tagout Interactive Training Program. OSHA eTool. Interactive tool to provide the user with an in-depth understanding of the LOTO standard, with three components: Tutorial, Hot Topics, and Case Studies.
  • Construction. OSHA eTool. Helps workers identify and control the hazards, including electrical hazards, that commonly cause the most serious construction injuries.
    • Electrical Incidents. Landing page for Electrical Incidents subpage of the Construction eTool, which identifies electrical hazards and recommends preventive measures.
  • Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution. OSHA eTool, (January, 2010). Assists workers in identifying and controlling workplace hazards.
Lockout/Tagout Concepts
Lockout/Tagout Program

Example elements of a lockout/tagout (LOTO) program are described in the OSHA standard for the control of hazardous energy (29 CFR 1910.147), along with these additional references.

Other Resources
Training
  • Lockout-Tagout Interactive Training Program. OSHA eTool. Interactive tool to provide the user with an in-depth understanding of the LOTO standard, with three components: Tutorial, Hot Topics, and Case Studies.
    • Case Studies. Presents a series of case studies for review, followed by related questions. Each of the case studies is based on descriptions of LOTO inspections derived from compliance interpretations, court decisions, Review Commission decisions, and inspection files.
  • Small Business Handbook (PDF). OSHA Publication 2209, (2005). Handbook is provided to owners, proprietors and managers of small businesses to assure the safety and health of workers.
  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD) Research Publications-11. Brief publication providing an overview of lockout/tagout, California laws and regulations, and training materials.
Additional Information
  • Fatality and Catastrophe Investigation Summaries. OSHA. Enables the user to search the text of Accident Investigation Summaries (OSHA-170 form) for words that may be contained in the text of the abstract or accident description.
  • Z244 Committee Information. American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE).
  • Safety Alert: Control of Hazardous Energy – Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO) Procedures in Shipyard Employment*. OSHA and Shipbuilders Council of America, National Shipbuilding Research Program, and American Shipbuilding Association Alliances (now the Shipbuilding Group Alliance) and the American Industrial Hygiene Association and American Society of Safety Engineers Alliances, (February 2009). Safety Alert Fact Sheet that provides information on how to protect employees from hazardous energy. Also available in Spanish*.
  • Safety Alert: Electrocution and Shock Hazards in Shipyard Employment*. OSHA and Shipbuilders Council of America, National Shipbuilding Research Program, and American Shipbuilding Association Alliances (now the Shipbuilding Group Alliance) and the American Industrial Hygiene Association and American Society of Safety Engineers Alliances, (February 2008). Safety Alert Fact Sheet that provides information on how to protect employees from electrocution and shock hazards. Also available in Spanish*.
Related Safety and Health Topics
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“Donnie’s Accident” – “I Was Too Good To Need My Safety Gear”

Donnie's Accident

On August 12, 2004, I was connecting large electrical generator in preparation for Hurricane Charlie. The meter I was using failed and blew carbon into the gear and created an electrical arc which resulted in an arc blast. The electrical equipment shown in the video is the actual equipment after the explosion when my co-workers were there trying to restore power and make temporary repairs. I ended up with full thickness, 3rd degree burns to both hands and arms along with 2nd and 3rd degree burns to my neck and face. I was in a coma for two months due to numerous complications from infections and medications.

During this time my family endured 4 hurricanes and the possibility of losing me. I am a husband, a father, a son and a brother, not just an electrician. It took almost two years of healing, surgeries and rehabilitation to only be able to return to work to an office job. I can’t use my hands and arms as well as I once could… BUT I’M ALIVE! There are those who have had similar accidents and fared much, much worse. I use my experiences to caution others.

All of this could have been avoided if I had been wearing my personal protection equipment (PPE), which I was fully trained to do and was in my work van. I would have probably only gone to the hospital for a checkup! I am asking you to protect yourself by following your safety procedures. Accidents at work not only affect you; think about the effects on your family, your friends, your finances, your company, your co-workers… your entire world.

Most of these injuries can be prevented by following the safety rules your company probably have in place. Most of these rules were put in place because of accidents like mine. Be safe, wear your PPE; not for fear of fines, penalties or getting fired. Be safe for yourself and for all the people close to you. I got a second chance… You might not!!! !!!

You can read a more in depth account of my accident on the “Full Story” page.

OSHA Arc Flash Safety Information
Understanding “Arc Flash” – Occupational Safety and Health …
https://www.osha.gov/…/arc_flash_han…

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Employees must follow the requirements of the Arc Flash Hazard label by wearing the proper personal protective equipment (PPE), use of insulated tools and other safety related precautions. This includes not working on or near the circuit unless you are a “qualified” worker.

“NFPA 70E – 2017” – “LOTO & Arc Flash Proposed Changes From Second Draft Meeting “

NFPA-70E-2015

The second draft meeting for NFPA 70E was held in Salt Lake City on July 18th through July 21st. There were 173 public comments acted on at the meeting. There are a few proposed changes to the standard that were acted upon that may garner the most attention.

NOTE:  The official position of the committee has not been given through the formal ballot. This blog only addresses preliminary revisions proposed by the public and committee.

The first is that the layout of Article 120 Establishing an Electrically Safe Work Condition has been reorganized to better address the logical sequence of events. The steps, principles, and program for lockout/tagout have been moved to be the first sections of Article 120 since these are necessary before verifying the condition.  The verification steps have been moved to the end of Article 120 since these are the last steps for establishing the electrically safe work condition.

A second change is to place further emphasis on the risk assessment and put the hierarchy of controls into mandatory language.  The use of personal protective equipment (PPE) has always been and remains to be the last method selected when providing protection for the worker exposed to hazards when conducting justified energized work. The revised text clarifies this principle.

The third changes clarifies how the standard should have always been used when justified energized work is to be conducted. It essentially is not adding new requirements but will assist in preventing the misuse of the standard. The change is that Table 130.7(C)(15)(A)(a) [that many call the task table] has become a new table applicable to both the PPE category method or the incident energy analysis method. It no longer determines whether PPE is required but whether or not there is a likelihood of an arc flash occurrence. The user conducts a risk assessment and determines the protection scheme to be employed to protect the worker using the hierarchy of controls (same as in the past editions).

The last big change is that the references to PPE equipment standards have been changed to informational notes. The equipment must still meet the applicable standards but the verification process has been changed to one of a conformity assessment where the PPE manufacturer should be able to provide assurance that the applicable standard has been met by one of three methods. The previous edition of the standard did not require any verification method. The three methods are; self-declaration with a Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity, self-declaration under a registered Quality  Management System and product testing by an accredited laboratory and a Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity, or a certification by an accredited independent third-party certification organization.

The committee’s official position will be taken by ballot in early September.  If you want to keep up on the process visit the NFPA 70E web page at www.nfpa.org/70E. The next edition tab will carry all the current information throughout the process. NFPA 70E – 2017 is slated to be voted on at the association meeting in Boston, MA in June 2017.

Safety Comic of the Day – “Electrical Safety”

20140410-101630.jpg

  • Electrical SafetyOSHA

    https://www.osha.gov/…/e

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Electrical Safety. … Electrical Safety. Electrical hazards can cause burns, shocks and electrocution (death). Assume that all overhead wires are energized at …

  • Safety and Health Topics | ElectricalOSHA

    https://www.osha.gov/…/e

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Working with electricity can be dangerous. Engineers, electricians, and other professionals work with electricity directly, including working on overhead lines, …

  • [PDF]

    Electrical Safety For General Industry – OSHA

    https://www.osha.gov/…/t…

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    WWW.WPSAC.ORG. 1. Train-the-Trainers Guide to. Electrical Safety. For General Industry. A Review of Common OSHA Regulations and Workplace Violations …

  • [PDF]

    Electrical Safety in the Workplace” – OSHA

    https://www.osha.gov/…/e

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Electrical Safe Work Practices including electrical safety principles, … Explain the issues (statistics) associated with poor electrical safety in the workplace.

  • [PDF]

    ELECTRICALOSHA

    https://www.osha.gov/…/e

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    OSHA’s electrical standards address the government’s concern that electricity … Association’s standard NFPA 70E, Electrical Safety Requirements for Employee.

  • [PDF]

    Controlling Electrical Hazards, OSHA 3075, 2002 (revised) – [PDF

    https://www.osha.gov/…/o

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    in the OSHA standards and the Occupational Safety … Occupational Safety and Health Administration … What OSHA standards address electrical safety?…………..

  • [PPT]

    Electrical SafetyOSHA

    https://www.osha.gov/…/f…

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Module 1 – Electrical Safety. Susan Harwood Grant Training Program. Disclaimer/Usage Notes. This material was produced under grant number SH-17793-SH8 …

  • General. – 1910.303 – OSHA

    https://www.osha.gov/…/o

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Electric equipment shall be free from recognized hazards that are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to employees. Safety of equipment shall be …

  • Safety and Health Topics | Electrical – Construction – OSHA

    https://www.osha.gov/…/e

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard. OSHA’s electrical standards are designed to protect employees exposed to dangers such …

Arc Flash Regulations Overview

 

New Regulations, NEC Labeling RequirementArcFlash-OSHA

OSHA is now citing and fining employers for failure to protect employees from the dangers of arc flash. For guidelines on best practices for protecting employees, OSHA refers employers to the 2012 edition of NFPA 70E standard, “Standard For Electrical Safety In the Workplace.”

The NFPA 70E 2012 edition instructs employers to conduct an arc flash analysis to determine the amount of thermal energy that could be generated in an arc flash incident. The information is then used to define a flash protection boundary around the potential source, and to determine the level of arc-rated apparel and other personal protection equipment required when employees cross the boundary while they work on or near exposed live parts.

In addition, the National Electric Code®(known as NFPA 70, which is different than NFPA 70E) added a requirement in 2002 mandating that potential arc flash hazards be labeled to warn of the hazard. The requirement, covered under Article 110.16, was updated and expanded in the 2005 version of the NEC. In the newly updated 2012 edition of NFPA 70E, these requirements from the NEC have been included to streamline industry best-practices. These requirements can now be found under article 130.5 (C) within the 2012 edition of NFPA 70E.

Source: Brady®

http://www.bradyid.com/bradyid/cms/contentView.do/2017/Arc-Flash.html

 

Fire Prevention Weekly Update – May 7, 2013

u-s-fire-administration

  1. Campaigns / Other Fire Prevention Efforts
  2. Campus fire safety
  3. Inspections/Code enforcement
  4. Smoke Alarms
  5. Sprinklers
  6. Wildland Fire Safety
  7. Fire safety tips and reminders
  8. Other Safety News
  9. International News

Links to Fire Prevention-related news articles – Updated 05/06/2013

Campaigns/ Other Fire Safety Activities

  1. MFRD: students ride fire boat; learn about fire safety on Mobile River (Alabama)
  2. Donated iPads will be used for fire safety education (Connecticutt)
  3. GFD helps hotels improve fire safety (Guam)
  4. Young pupil’s homework used in fire safety drive (United Kingdom)
  5. Importance of fire prevention and smoke alarms presented to seniors (Louisianna)
  6. There’s no place like Home Safe Home (Canada)
  7. Fire District 1 offering free smoke alarms and home safety checks (Washington)

Campus fire safety

  1. GW Extends Fire Safety to Study Abroad
  2. Fire Knocked Down At USC’s Viterbi School Of Engineering (California)

Inspections / Code enforcement

  1. Fatal Carmel fire unable to alter building codes (New York)
  2. Focus on fire safety as May arrives: know codes to avoid costly problems (Wisconsin)
  3. New fire code rules in effect this week after Naples raises concerns (Florida)

Smoke Alarms

  1. Girl alerts household to fire OFD: Too many families without working smoke alarms
  2. Mother and two young children safe after escaping fire
  3. Clarington fire chief frustrated by number of homes without smoke alarms (Canada)

Sprinklers

  1. Buffalo Grove Officials Debate Home Fire Sprinklers (Illinois)
  2. Sprinklers credited with keeping Mount Prospect shopping center fire under control
  3. St. Paul fire chief to honor workers who installed sprinklers in public housing
  4. Fire Knocked Down At USC’s Viterbi School Of Engineering (California)
  5. Home fire sprinklers requirements in California yield no negative impact on construction (NFPA)
  6. Proposals to exempt fire sprinklers in the IRC withdrawn (NFPA)
  7. Senior living facility fire contained by fire sprinklers (Tinley Park, IL)
  8. Fire Marshal Leaves Home Sprinklers On Table (West Virginia)
  9. Mesa uses federal dollars to help fund home sprinkler efforts (NFPA)
  10. Fire sprinklers save two Redmond area buildings on Saturday (Washington)

Wildland Fire Safety

  1. Communities take action to enhance fire safety (California)
  2. Wildfire preparedness efforts pay off (Colorado)
  3. Fire Marshal Warns of Dangerous Conditions (New Hampshire)
  4. Red Flag Warning up, UC Berkeley identifies risk (California)
  5. Springs Fire May Be Fully Contained Monday

Safety tips and reminders

  1. Keep older adults in mind this National Electrical Safety Month (NFPA)
  2. Deaths illustrate fire safety is not just slogan (South Carolina)

Other Safety News

  1. Communities can combat arson; state fire marshal says work together (Illinois)
  2. Carbon Monoxide Detectors Not Required In Oklahoma Schools
  3. Nearly 50,000 home fires involved electrical failures or malfunctions (NFPA)
  4. Fall safety and high jinks make the point on TV show (NFPA)
  5. 5 women die in limousine fire on Calif. bridge


Fire Prevention News: International

  1. Alarm hailed as life saver (New Zealand)
  2. Tokyo tackles fire risks in old houses (Japan)
  3. Greater Manchester firefighters remind the public to be careful when cooking
  4. Young pupil’s homework used in fire safety drive (United Kingdom)
  5. There’s no place like Home Safe Home (Canada)
  6. Sprinklers to be law in retirement homes (Ontario, Canada)

OSHA Safeguards For Electrical Personal Protection – Arc Flash

This is probably the second most-viewed arc flash video online. It shows three workers working in the open door of an exterior electrical substation when an arc flash occurs. They all sustained burns—one was very serious. Read more about this story here.

This video shows the supervised re-energizing of a switchgear box that led to an arc blast. No one was injured in this video, but it does illustrate the explosive force of such an event. Unlike the first two videos, this video has audio and is shot from a close distance; this gives a more visceral sense of the blast’s raw power.

Arc Flash Hazard Risk Clothing Minimum Requirements

Jazard Risk Chart - Arc Flash Protective Clothing


Part Number: 1910
• Part Title: Occupational Safety and Health Standards
• Subpart: S
• Subpart Title: Electrical
• Standard Number: 1910.335
• Title: Safeguards for personnel protection.

1910.335(a)

Use of protective equipment.

1910.335(a)(1)

Personal protective equipment.

1910.335(a)(1)(i)

Employees working in areas where there are potential electrical hazards shall be provided with, and shall use, electrical protective equipment that is appropriate for the specific parts of the body to be protected and for the work to be performed.

Note: Personal protective equipment requirements are contained in subpart I of this part.

1910.335(a)(1)(ii)

Protective equipment shall be maintained in a safe, reliable condition and shall be periodically inspected or tested, as required by 1910.137.

1910.335(a)(1)(iii)

If the insulating capability of protective equipment may be subject to damage during use, the insulating material shall be protected. (For example, an outer covering of leather is sometimes used for the protection of rubber insulating material.)

1910.335(a)(1)(iv)

Employees shall wear nonconductive head protection wherever there is a danger of head injury from electric shock or burns due to contact with exposed energized parts.

1910.335(a)(1)(v)

Employees shall wear protective equipment for the eyes or face wherever there is danger of injury to the eyes or face from electric arcs or flashes or from flying objects resulting from electrical explosion.

1910.335(a)(2)

General protective equipment and tools.

1910.335(a)(2)(i)

When working near exposed energized conductors or circuit parts, each employee shall use insulated tools or handling equipment if the tools or handling equipment might make contact with such conductors or parts. If the insulating capability of insulated tools or handling equipment is subject to damage, the insulating material shall be protected.

1910.335(a)(2)(i)(A)

Fuse handling equipment, insulated for the circuit voltage, shall be used to remove or install fuses when the fuse terminals are energized.

1910.335(a)(2)(i)(B)

Ropes and handlines used near exposed energized parts shall be nonconductive.

1910.335(a)(2)(ii)

Protective shields, protective barriers, or insulating materials shall be used to protect each employee from shock, burns, or other electrically related injuries while that employee is working near exposed energized parts which might be accidentally contacted or where dangerous electric heating or arcing might occur. When normally enclosed live parts are exposed for maintenance or repair, they shall be guarded to protect unqualified persons from contact with the live parts.

1910.335(b)

Alerting techniques. The following alerting techniques shall be used to warn and protect employees from hazards which could cause injury due to electric shock, burns, or failure of electric equipment parts:

1910.335(b)(1)

Safety signs and tags. Safety signs, safety symbols, or accident prevention tags shall be used where necessary to warn employees about electrical hazards which may endanger them, as required by 1910.145.

1910.335(b)(2)

Barricades. Barricades shall be used in conjunction with safety signs where it is necessary to prevent or limit employee access to work areas exposing employees to uninsulated energized conductors or circuit parts. Conductive barricades may not be used where they might cause an electrical contact hazard.

1910.335(b)(3)

Attendants. If signs and barricades do not provide sufficient warning and protection from electrical hazards, an attendant shall be stationed to warn and protect employees.

 

Fire Prevention Weekly Update – January 23, 2013

u-s-fire-administration

  1. Campaigns / Other Fire Prevention Efforts
  2. Campus fire safety
  3. Inspections/Code enforcement
  4. Smoke Alarms
  5. Sprinklers
  6. Wildland Fire Safety
  7. Fire safety tips and reminders
  8. Other Safety News
  9. International News

Links to Fire Prevention-related news articles – Updated 01/21/2013

Campaigns/ Other Fire Safety Activities

  1. Volunteers Educate Neighbors on Fire Safety (Nevada)
  2. Volunteers Use MLK Holiday To Spread Awareness About Fire Safety (Nebraska)
  3. Fire prevention effort underway in Council Bluffs (Iowa)
  4. Newton Fire Service reminds citizens smoke alarms save lives (Georgia)
  5. Fire safety stressed to mobile home park residents (California)
  6. Fire District 1 continues to protect hearing impaired, deaf community (Florida)
  7. Project SAFE launched to help prevent home fires (Nevada)
  8. Rockdale firefighters to give away smoke detectors (Georgia)
  9. Fire crews check homes for smoke detectors in Conyers (Georgia)

Campus fire safety

  1. 177 students displaced in dorm fire
  2. Second University of Cincinnati student dies from off-campus fire
  3. MSU perfect on IHL fire sprinkler mandate (Mississippi)
  4. Smoke alarms are important: having children play an active role (Georgia)
  5. UMass student dies in Amherst apartment complex fire

Inspections / Code enforcement

  1. Kendall seeks state fire code change (Illinois)

Smoke Alarms

  1. Smoke alarm crisis: Conyers, Ga. tragedy should be a wake-up call
  2. Fire destroys Hadley home, detectors help save couple (Massachusetts)
  3. Fire District 1 continues to protect hearing impaired, deaf community (Florida)

Sprinklers

  1. Free presentation: The dangers of lightweight construction (NFPA)
  2. Firefighter Diane Woods talks about the importance of live burn demonstrations (NFPA)
  3. Fire sprinklers keep home fire in check
  4. Fire chief to Holmes Beach: Consider sprinklers in R-2 (Florida)
  5. Program Incentivizes Sprinkler Upgrades (South Dakota)

Wildland Fire Safety

  1. Firewise Launches National Wildfire Safety Challenge for Communities (NFPA)

Safety tips and reminders

  1. A Clothes Dryer Fire Safety Lesson (NFPA)
  2. Plainfield Fire Dept: Heat Your Home Safely
  3. Fire marshall: Use portable heaters safely (Tennessee)
  4. Don’t let cold weather become a fire hazard (Georgia)
  5. Fire safety stressed to mobile home park residents (California)

Other Safety News

  1. Portable Heaters Overload Wiring, Spark Washington Fire
  2. Space Heaters Blamed for Three FiresThis Week (Missouri)
  3. Boston records lowest number of fire fatalities among large cities in 2012
  4. Georgia fire officials warn residents to be diligent
  5. Sharon Osbourne Fire: Candle sets fire to Osbourne’s Beverly Hills
  6. Hand sanitizers can be dangerous
  7. Fire deaths at record low in Md. in 2012
  8. Fire deaths in Ohio reach 26-year low in 2012


Fire Prevention News: International

  1. Improving fire safety at senior residences (Canada)
  2. Life-saving campaign cuts fire deaths by almost 50% (UK)

 

On the Job Webinar Series – NFPA 70E – Thursday, May 31, 2012 1:00 PM CT


On the Job Webinar Series

On the Job is a FREE online Webinar series designed to provide industry information and updates to help keep you informed about the latest trends affecting your business or organization. Industry experts and knowledgeable Grainger staff partner through On the Job to provide relevant solutions regarding some of the key business issues you face every day including:

UPCOMING WEBINARS

HEALTHCARE
MONTH TOPIC
May 2012 Healthcare Sustainability – Energy Management
Jun 2012 Healthcare Sustainability – Energy Management
Jul 2012 Healthcare Emergency Preparedness – Power Continuity
SAFETY
MONTH TOPIC
May 2012 Safety: NFPA 70E Navigating The Standard
Jun 2012 Safety: Beating the Heat: Overview of Employee Cooling Options
Jul 2012 Safety: Implementing Global Harmonization System (GHS) into your HazCom Program

PAST WEBINARS

HEALTHCARE
MONTH TOPIC
Apr 2012 Healthcare: Sustainability – Paint Standards & Regulatory Compliance View recording
Mar 2012 Healthcare: Electrical Code Standards & Regulatory Compliance – Power Strips & Patient Care Consideration View recording
Feb 2012 Healthcare: Air Quality – Reducing Risk During Construction and Renovation Projects View recording
Jan 2012 Healthcare: Air Quality – Reducing Risk Through Smart Facility Management View recording
Oct 2011 Healthcare: Sustainability Practices – Chemical Management View recording
Aug 2011 Healthcare: Sustainability Practices – Water Management View recording
SAFETY
MONTH TOPIC
Apr 2012 Safety: High Vis Clothing Requirements for Workzones View recording
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