“OSHA National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls In Construction – May 8-12, 2017” #StandDown4Safety

Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees, accounting for 350 of the 937 construction fatalities recorded in 2015 (BLS data). Those deaths were preventable. The National Fall Prevention Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries.


What is a Safety Stand-Down?

A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on “Fall Hazards” and reinforcing the importance of “Fall Prevention”. It’s an opportunity for employers to have a conversation with employees about hazards, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals. It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall hazards they see.

Who Can Participate?

Anyone who wants to prevent falls in the workplace can participate in the Stand-Down. In past years, participants included commercial construction companies of all sizes, residential construction contractors, sub- and independent contractors, highway construction companies, general industry employers, the U.S. Military, other government participants, unions, employer’s trade associations, institutes, employee interest organizations, and safety equipment manufacturers.

Partners

OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

How to Conduct a Safety Stand-Down and FAQ’s

Companies can conduct a Safety Stand-Down by taking a break to have a toolbox talk or another safety activity such as conducting safety equipment inspections, developing rescue plans, or discussing job specific hazards. Managers are encouraged to plan a stand-down that works best for their workplace anytime during the May 8-12, 2017. SeeSuggestions to Prepare for a Successful “Stand-Down” and Highlights from the Past Stand-Downs. OSHA also hosts an Events page with events that are free and open to the public to help employers and employees find events in your area.

Certificate of Participation

Employers will be able to provide feedback about their Stand-Down and download a Certificate of Participation following the Stand-Down.

Share Your Story With Us

If you want to share information with OSHA on your Safety Stand-Down, Fall Prevention Programs or suggestions on how we can improve future initiatives like this, please send your email to oshastanddown@dol.gov. Also share your Stand-Down story on social media, with the hashtag: #StandDown4Safety.

If you plan to host a free event that is open to the public, see OSHA’s Events page to submit the event details and to contact your Regional Stand-Down Coordinator.

Additional Resources:

OSHA’s Falls Prevention Campaign Page (en español)

Fall Prevention Training Guide – A Lesson Plan for Employers (PDF) (EPUB | MOBI). Spanish (PDF) (EPUB | MOBI).

Fall Prevention Publications Webpage contains fall prevention materials in English and Spanish.

Ladder Safety Guidance

Scaffolding

  • Ladder Jack Scaffolds Fact Sheet (PDF)
  • Narrow Frame Scaffolds Fact Sheet (HTML PDF)
  • Tube and Coupler Scaffolds – Erection and Use Fact Sheet (PDF)
  • Tube and Coupler Scaffolds – Planning and Design Fact Sheet (PDF)
  • Scaffolding Booklet (HTML PDF)
  • OSHA Scaffold eTool
Stand-Down Partner Materials

Outreach Training Materials

Fall Safety Videos

Additional Educational Materials

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“Top 5 OSHA Issues to Track in 2017″ Webinar” @OSHA_Guy

Presented by Eric J. Conn, Kate McMahon, Amanda Strainis-Walker, Micah Smith, Lindsay DiSalvo and Dan Deacon

The ball has dropped, the confetti has been swept out of Times Square, and 2016 is in the books.  It’s time to look back at the year and take stock of what we learned from and about OSHA over the past year.  More importantly, the question on everyone’s mind (well, maybe just ours), is what can we expect from OSHA in the first year of the Trump Administration?  In this webinar event, attorneys from the national OSHA Practice Group at Conn Maciel Carey will review OSHA enforcement, rulemaking, and other developments from 2016, and will discuss the Top 5 OSHA Issues employers should monitor and prepare for in the New Year.

Participants will learn the following:

  • 2016 OSHA enforcement data and trends and rulemaking achievements

  • Important OSHA developments from 2016

  • Major OSHA rulemaking and other developments to expect during the Trump Administration’s inaugural year

  • Other significant OSHA policy issues to watch out for in the New Year

Click here for a complete list of Conn Maciel Carey OSHA Webinars for 2017

safety, safety training

“Trump Signs Repeal of Volks Rule: Workers Lose”

President Trump yesterday signed the resolution repealing the Volks rule, thereby permanently removing OSHA’s ability to cite patterns of injury and illness recordkeeping violations.  The resolution, passed under the Congressional Review Act, is yet another step in the Administration’s goal of deconstruction the administrative state, or as the Washington Post’s E.J. Dionne explained recently:

In practice, this is a war on a century’s worth of work to keep our air and water clean; our food, drugs, and workplaces safe; the rights of employees protected, and the marketplace fair and unrigged. It’s one thing to make regulations more efficient and no more intrusive than necessary. It’s another to say that all the structures of democratic government designed to protect our citizens from the abuses of concentrated private power should be swept away.

The Senate voted, 50-48 to repeal the Volks rule, and the House voted 231 – 191 last month to repeal the rule.

Employers are still required to retain accurate injury and illness records for 5 years, but there is no way now for OSHA to enforce any violations that are older than 6 months from the time a citation is issued. This means, effectively, that there will be no more large OSHA recordkeeping cases similar to those which throughout OSHA history — in Democratic and Republican administrations — have impacted entire industries.

See the rest of this post at Jordan Barab’s, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor at OSHA from 2009-17 Website “Confined Spaces”

Note: As always, I am providing Workplace Safety & Health Information to my fellow Safety professionals. The above article and others by Mr. Barab have some very valid points. Read and you decide. Political comments will not be replied to. Workplace Safety is not a Political Issue. ~JB

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