“Workplace Violence Prevention” – Video & Information”

 What is workplace violence?

Workplace violence is any act or threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening disruptive behavior that occurs at the work site. It ranges from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and even homicide. It can affect and involve employees, clients, customers and visitors. Homicide is currently the fourth-leading cause of fatal occupational injuries in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), of the 4,679 fatal workplace injuries that occurred in the United States in 2014, 403 were workplace homicides. [More…] However it manifests itself, workplace violence is a major concern for employers and employees nationwide.

Who is at risk of workplace violence?

Nearly 2 million American workers report having been victims of workplace violence each year. Unfortunately, many more cases go unreported. Research has identified factors that may increase the risk of violence for some workers at certain worksites. Such factors include exchanging money with the public and working with volatile, unstable people. Working alone or in isolated areas may also contribute to the potential for violence. Providing services and care, and working where alcohol is served may also impact the likelihood of violence. Additionally, time of day and location of work, such as working late at night or in areas with high crime rates, are also risk factors that should be considered when addressing issues of workplace violence. Among those with higher-risk are workers who exchange money with the public, delivery drivers, healthcare professionals, public service workers, customer service agents, law enforcement personnel, and those who work alone or in small groups.

How can workplace violence hazards be reduced?

In most workplaces where risk factors can be identified, the risk of assault can be prevented or minimized if employers take appropriate precautions. One of the best protections employers can offer their workers is to establish a zero-tolerance policy toward workplace violence. This policy should cover all workers, patients, clients, visitors, contractors, and anyone else who may come in contact with company personnel.

By assessing their worksites, employers can identify methods for reducing the likelihood of incidents occurring. OSHA believes that a well-written and implemented workplace violence prevention program, combined with engineering controls, administrative controls and training can reduce the incidence of workplace violence in both the private sector and federal workplaces.

This can be a separate workplace violence prevention program or can be incorporated into a safety and health program, employee handbook, or manual of standard operating procedures. It is critical to ensure that all workers know the policy and understand that all claims of workplace violence will be investigated and remedied promptly. In addition, OSHA encourages employers to develop additional methods as necessary to protect employees in high risk industries.

How do I find out about employer responsibilities and workers’ rights?

Workers have a right to a safe workplace. The law requires employers to provide their employees with safe and healthful workplaces. The OSHA law also prohibits employers from retaliating against employees for exercising their rights under the law (including the right to raise a health and safety concern or report an injury). For more information see www.whistleblowers.gov or Workers’ rights under the OSH Act.

OSHA can help answer questions or concerns from employers and workers. To reach your regional or area OSHA office, go to the OSHA Offices by State webpage or call 1-800-321-OSHA (6742).

Small business employers may contact OSHA’s free and confidential On-site Consultation program to help determine whether there are hazards at their worksites and work with OSHA on correcting any identified hazards. Consultants in this program from state agencies or universities work with employers to identify workplace hazards, provide advice on compliance with OSHA standards, and assist in establishing injury and illness prevention programs. On-site Consultation services are separate from enforcement activities and do not result in penalties or citations. To contact OSHA’s free consultation service, go to OSHA’s On-site Consultation web page or call 1-800-321-OSHA (6742) and press number 4.

Workers may file a complaint to have OSHA inspect their workplace if they believe that their employer is not following OSHA standards or that there are serious hazards. Workers can file a complaint with OSHA by calling 1-800-321-OSHA (6742), online via eComplaint Form, or by printing the complaint form and mailing or faxing it to the local OSHA area office. Complaints that are signed by a worker are more likely to result in an inspection.

If you think your job is unsafe or if you have questions, contact OSHA at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742). Your contact will be kept confidential. We can help. For other valuable worker protection information, such as Workers’ Rights, Employer Responsibilities, and other services OSHA offers, visit OSHA’s Workers’ page.

Prevention Programs

The following references provide guidance for evaluating and controlling violence in the workplace.

OSHA Guidance
Other Federal Agency Guidance
  • Home Healthcare Workers: How to Prevent Violence on the Job. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2012-118, (February 2012).
  • Workplace Violence Prevention Strategies and Research Needs. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2006-144, (September 2006).
  • Violence on the Job. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2004-100d, (2004). Provides streaming video resources that discusses practical measures for identifying risk factors for violence at work, and taking strategic action to keep employees safe. Based on extensive NIOSH research, supplemented with information from other authoritative sources. Transcript also available.
  • Stress… at Work. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-101, (1999). Highlights knowledge about the causes of stress at work and outlines steps that can be taken to prevent job stress.
  • Preventing Homicide in the Workplace. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 93-109, (May 1995). Helps employers and employees to identify high-risk occupations and workplaces, informs employers and employees about their risks, encourages employers and employees to evaluate risk factors in their workplaces and implement protective measures, and encourages researchers to gather more detailed information about occupational homicide and to develop and evaluate protective measures.
  • Occupational Violence. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Workplace Safety and Health Topic. Provides basic information on workplace violence including risk factors and prevention strategies.
  • New Directions from the Field: Victims Rights and Services for the 21st Century (PDF). U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Chapter 12 of the New Directions report on crime victims, (August 1998). Deals with victims rights and services in the business environment, and contains a section on workplace violence and provides practical advice for the business community on assisting the victims of workplace violence.
  • Dealing with Workplace Violence: A Guide for Agency Planners (PDF). U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). Assists those who are responsible for establishing workplace violence initiatives at their agencies. This handbook is the result of a cooperative effort of many federal agencies sharing their expertise in preventing and dealing with workplace violence.
State and Local Guidance
  • Workplace Safety Consultation – Workplace Violence Prevention. Minnesota Department of Labor & Industry. Provides links to prevention resources including workplace violence videos, links to other organizations and training resources:
    • A Comprehensive Guide for Employers and Employees *. Provides guidance to develop and implement a workplace violence prevention program. Includes model policy, sample forms, threat and assault log, five warning signs of escalating behavior, sample workplace weapons policy, sample policy about domestic violence in the workplace and personal conduct to minimize violence.
  • Violence Prevention Brochure: Maintaining a Safe Workplace. University of California – Davis (UC Davis). Presents information designed to highlight stresses and risks in the work environment, to enhance workplace safety, and to reduce and prevent disruption and violence.
  • MINCAVA Electronic Clearinghouse – Workplace Violence. Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse (MINCAVA), University of Minnesota (UM). Provides resources identified by the Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse specific to workplace violence.
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“CSB Releases New Safety Video Detailing Investigation into 2013 Fatal Fire and Explosion at the Williams Olefins Plant in Geismar, LA”

January 25, 2017, Washington, DC –

Today the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) released a safety video of its investigation of the June 13, 2013 explosion and fire at the Williams Olefins Plant in Geismar, Louisiana, which killed two workers and injured an additional 167.  The deadly explosion and fire occurred when a heat exchanger containing flammable liquid propane violently ruptured.

The CSB’s newly released 12-minute safety video entitled, “Blocked In,” includes a 3D animation of the explosion and fire as well as interviews with CSB investigator Lauren Grim and Chairperson Vanessa Allen Sutherland. The video is based on the CSB’s case study on the Williams incident and can be viewed on the CSB’s website and YouTube.

Chairperson Sutherland said, “Our investigation on the explosion at Williams describes an ineffective process safety management program at the plant at the time of the incident. We urge other companies to incorporate our recommendations at their facilities and to assess the state of their cultures to promote safety at all organizational levels to prevent a similar accident. ”

The CSB’s investigation found many process safety management program deficiencies at Williams, which set the stage for the incident. In particular, the CSB found that the heat exchanger that failed was completely isolated from its pressure relief valve.

In the video, Investigator Lauren Grim said, “When evaluating overpressure protection requirements for heat exchangers, engineers must think about how to manage potential scenarios, including unintentional hazards. In this case, simply having a pressure relief valve available could have prevented the explosion.”

The CSB investigation concluded that in the twelve years leading to the incident, a series of process safety management program deficiencies caused the heat exchanger to be unprotected from overpressure.  As revealed in the investigation, during that time Management of Change Reviews, Pre-Startup Safety Reviews, and Process Hazard Analyses all failed to effectively identify and control the hazard.

In addition, the CSB found that Williams failed to develop a written procedure for activities performed on the day of the incident, nor did the company have a routine maintenance schedule to prevent the operational heat exchanger from needing to be shut down for cleaning.

Finally, the video describes CSB’s recommendations made to the Williams Geismar plant which  encourages similar companies to review and incorporate into their own facilities. These include:

– Conduct safety culture assessments that involve workforce participation, and communicate the results in reports that recommend specific actions to address safety culture weaknesses

– Develop a robust safety indicators tracking program that uses the data identified to drive continual safety improvement

– And perform comprehensive process safety program assessments to thoroughly evaluate the effectiveness of the facility’s process safety programs.

“Managers must implement and then monitor safety programs and encourage a strong culture of safety to protect workers and the environment,” Chairperson Vanessa Allen Sutherland said,

The CSB is an independent federal agency charged with investigating serious chemical accidents. CSB investigations examine all aspects of chemical accidents, including physical causes such as equipment failure as well as inadequacies in regulations, industry standards, and safety management systems.

The Board does not issue citations or fines but makes safety recommendations to companies, industry organizations, labor groups, and regulatory agencies such as OSHA and EPA. Please visit our website, http://www.csb.gov.

For more information, contact Communications Manager Hillary Cohen at public@csb.gov or by phone at 202.446.8095.

 

7 Driving Hacks Every Driver Needs to Know

7 Driving Hacks Every Driver Needs to Know

Great Auto Safety Information!

Just Jenn

These are seven driving hacks that, by the looks of local parking lots and trucks at the bottom of Lake Winnebago, every driver on the road today definitely needs!

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“House Fires Caused By Storage of 9 Volt, AA Batteries In Junk Drawers & Other Places Rising”

* If You Know of a Fire Incident in Your Town Caused by 9 Volt, AA or AAA Battery Storage in a Home, Please Note it in the comments Section of this Post! Thank You!

Click here for the recent Hastings, Nebraska House Fire on January 16, 2017

If you are storing loose 9 volt or AA or other batteries in a kitchen drawer or a “junk” drawer in your home, watch how you store them. Above all don’t store them loose and rolling around with other metal items, like small tools, paper clips, nails and more of the lovely mix of things we keep in our junk drawers. You also don’t want them loose and rolling around in other items like a camera case, luggage, etc.

All you need to have happened is for a metal object like steel wool or a paper clip short out across the top of a 9-volt battery and ignite paper or other easily ignited materials and you’ll have a potential disaster in your home. As indicated in the YouTube Video below, it doesn’t take much to heat a metallic object or cause a spark in order to start a fire. *Please Do Not Do This At Home*

What to do with a 9 Volt Battery

I teach safety to the public, common sense tells most of us what to do in situations that could become life threatening. I speak to 50-60 people at a time about fire safety in the home on a monthly basis. I get the same reaction from every group when I hold up a 9-volt battery and announce that it is a fire hazard and it could burn down your house.

They all kinda look at me funny, as if to ask, “Did you just say a 9-volt battery could burn down my house?” That look is almost comical.

Q: Where do you store your batteries?

A: Throw them in  in a “junk” drawer

I then hold up a brillo pad. (just one example)

Q: What do you do with the batteries when you are done with them?

A: Throw them in the trash.

A 9-volt battery (see video) is a fire hazard because the positive and negative posts are on top, right next to one another. If this comes in contact with anything metal (aluminum foil, brillo, etc…) it will spark, and if there is a fuel for this spark you will have a fire. (fire needs heat, fuel and oxygen to burn) To test this theory, put a 9-volt battery or a couple of AA batteries in your pocket with some loose change or your key chain full of keys, (use common sense) this will bring on a whole new meaning to the words, Hot Pants.

When you dispose of this type of battery (positive and negative on top) Make sure it is safely wrapped in electrical tape or something to keep it separated from anything else that may come in contact with it. A small box or zip lock bag if kept in a junk drawer should suffice.  I have seen in some stores now that the manufacturers are now packaging them with plastic caps. If you need to purchase a 9-volt battery try to find those that are packaged in this manner.

Try to be just as diligent with AA or AAA batteries. Keep them in their original packaging if stored in a “junk drawer”. Don’t let them roll around freely with all the other wonderful miscellaneous items we unknowingly toss in the drawer and don’t think twice about it.

 

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“The True Cost Of Work Related Injuries – Accidents Cost More Than People Realize!”

The True Cost Of Work Related Injuries – An infographic by the team at SafetyVideos.com

“12,000 All Power Portable Generators Recalled by J.D. North America Due to Explosion, Fire and Burn Hazards”

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J.D. North America Corp., of Charlotte, N.C., is recalling about 12,300 All Power portable gasoline generators sold in the U.S. and Mexico.

The fuel tank can leak, posing explosion, fire and burn hazards.

The firm has received 21 reports of fuel leakage. No injuries or property damage have been reported.

This recall involves All Power portable gasoline generators with model numbers APGG6000 and APGG7500. The black and red generators have a black fuel tank on top of the units.

Model APGG6000 generators are rated at 6,000 watts and have UPC code 8 4676600055 3 and serial number JD29014S18035 through JD29014U020742. Model APGG7500 generators are rated at 7,500 watts and have UPC code 8 4676600056 0 and serial number JD42014S16027 through JD42014T210606.

The model number is located on both sides of the unit. The UPC code and serial number can be found on a silver plate on the upper right hand-side of the back side panel.

The generators, manufactured in China, were sold at Big Sandy Superstores, Family Farm & Home, Inc., Home Owners Bargain Outlet, Mills Fleet Farm Corp., Nexcom West Coast and other stores nationwide and online at Bluestem.com, BrandsmartUSA.com, HomeDepot.com, hoboonline.com, jbtoolsales.com and other online retailers from March 2014, through May 2016, for between $510 and $725.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled generators and contact J.D. North America to schedule a free replacement fuel tank, including installation.

Consumers may contact J.D. North America toll-free at (844) 287-4655 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, by email at apggrecall@jdna.com, or online at www.allpoweramerica.com and click on the APGG Recall link for more information.

 

“National Preparedness Month 2016” – “Are You Ready?” #NatPrep

Don't Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.  

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

National Preparedness Month

September is recognized as National Preparedness Month (NPM) which serves as a reminder that we all must take action to prepare, now and throughout the year, for the types of emergencies that could affect us where we live, work, and also where we visit. Due to the success of last year’s theme, “Don’t Wait, Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today,” will be returning for this September with a continuing emphasis on preparedness for youth, older adults, and people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs.  Thank you for taking time help make America more prepared for emergencies.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHow To Use This Toolkit

The National Preparedness Month Social Media Toolkit has key marketing and preparedness messaging you can print or share on your social media channels to spread the word to colleagues, family and friends throughout the month of September and beyond! You can either copy these messages directly or customize them to reach your audience.

This section is Expanded. Click to Collapse2016 Weekly Themes

  • Promote NPM:  August 28-September 3                  Kickoff to National Preparedness Month
  • Week 2:  September 4-10                                            Preparing Family & Friends
  • Week 3:  September 11-17                                          Preparing Through Service
  • Week 4:  September 18-24                                          Individual Preparedness
  • Week 5:  September 25-30                                          Lead up to National PrepareAthon Day

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHashtags & Emoji’s

  • #NatlPrep
  • #YouthPrep
  • #PrepareAthon if you are conducting a preparedness exercise, tabletop discussion, or sharing a preparedness-in-action moment.
  • Feel free to add emoji’s (the little pictures on your mobile phone keyboard) to your social messages.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseGraphics, Logo, Videos, & Related Links

Check out tips and ideas to promote preparedness content. For more engaging content, attach graphics that are sized appropriately for specific social media posts (i.e. Twitter & Facebook).

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePromote NPM: August 28-September 3| Kickoff To National Preparedness Month

Social Media Content

This content can be used on various social media channels, and is less than 140 characters.

  • #NatlPrep Month starts 9/1. Promote the theme “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” Tools: www.ready.gov/september
  • National Preparedness Month starts September 1! Follow #NatlPrep for tips. More info: www.ready.gov/september
  • “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” Get started here: www.ready.gov/make-a-plan #NatlPrep
  • National Preparedness Month has a different theme every week. Details: www.ready.gov/september #NatlPrep
  • Share your plans for National Preparedness Month using the hashtag #NatlPrep
  • Get ready to go from awareness to action during National Preparedness Month. #NatlPrep
  • RT This: “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” #NatlPrep
  • Creating your Family Emergency Communication Plan starts with one simple question “What if?” 1.usa.gov/1JwEwRG #NatlPrep
  • Does your family know what to do during a disaster? Start a plan today. #NatlPrep
  • You may not be with family when an emergency happens.  Create an emergency plan now: 1.usa.gov/1JwEwRG #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 2- September 4-10| Preparing Family & Friends

During this week you will know how to:

  • Contact family and friends before, during, and after an emergency.
  • Make a family emergency communication plan
  • Consider that your entire family may not be together during a disaster- make a plan of how you will reunite after an emergency.
  • Prepare for the unique needs of your family members, friends and neighbors.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

View in FEMA Multimedia Library

Social Media Content

Family Emergency Communication Plan

  • First week of #NatlPrep month is about getting all generations prepared. Anyone aged 2-102 should be ready for disasters!
  • Check out these tools to start your family emergency plan today: www.ready.gov/kids/make-a-plan #NatlPrep
  • Preparing the family for an emergency is as simple as a convo over dinner. Get started with tips fromwww.ready.gov #NatlPrep
  • What’s in your wallet? Part of our family emergency communication plan can be. Get the pocket-sized version: 1.usa.gov/1LPuV9o #NatlPrep
  • Tip: Keep important numbers written down in your wallet, not just on your phone: 1.usa.gov/1LPuV9o #NatlPrep
  • Take part in #PrepareAthon Day on 9/30 by participating in a preparedness discussion or training: 1.usa.gov/1S6oT4U #NatlPrep
  • Complete the actions in this #preparedness puzzle, you’ll be 10 steps closer to being prepared for an emergency: bit.ly/22tNNpV #NatlPrep
  • Download a group texting app so the entire family can keep in touch before, during & after an emergency. #NatlPrep

Youth Preparedness

  • Sending the kids off to school? Make sure they know what to do in case of an emergency. www.Ready.gov/kids#NatlPrep
  • Include your pet in your emergency preparedness plans. Info: www.ready.gov/pets #NatlPrep
  • Nearly 70M children are in school/childcare each workday. Make a family plan to know how to reunite during an emergency #NatlPrep
  • Kids bored? We can help. Check out our online Ready Kids build a kit game: http://go.usa.gov/5hS5 #NatlPrep
  • Ask your child’s school for a copy of their emergency plan for you to keep at home or work #NatlPrep
  • Fill out emergency contact numbers with your kids before they go #BackToSchool #NatlPrep

Caregivers/Older Adults

  • Caregivers, get all the resources you need in case of an emergency. Check out ready.gov for tips. #NatlPrep
  • Dads at work, Gram’s with friends, kids are at school when disaster strikes. How will you get in touch? Don’t Wait. Communicate. #NatlPrep
  • Make sure parents and grandparents know how to text/post messages for emergencies. #NatlPrep
  • Make sure your parents/grandparents have a *secure* digital copy of their insurance info. #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 3:  September 11-17|Preparing Through Service

During this week you will know how to:

  • Understand the importance of community preparedness.
  • Get involved with your community organization or plan with neighbors.
  • Highlight local preparedness efforts in your community.
  • Celebrate first responders.
  • Celebrate emergency-focused organizations who serve communities.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

National Day of Service & Remembrance

  • I will [fill in your service project] What will you do for your community on this National Day of Service & Remembrance? Tell us using #911Day
  • Do at least 1 good deed for your community on 9/11: http://bit.ly/29DymSw  #911Day
  • Thousands of people all around the nation will commit to a day of service on September 11. Be a part of it and share your experience! Using #911Day
  • How will you give back on National Day of Service & Remembrance? Snap It. Tag It. Post It. #911Day

Volunteer with an Organization

Help Your Community Get Prepared

  • Give a shout out to first responders and community service organizations that have made a difference in your community! #NatlPrep
  • Looking for an opportunity to serve your community? Start with steps found on @ServeDotGovhttp://bit.ly/2a3FAEr #NatlPrep
  • Emergency preparedness is a “whole community” effort. Get involved in your community today:http://bit.ly/2a3FAEr #NatlPrep
  • Your neighbor may have to rely on you during an emergency. Will you be ready:  http://bit.ly/29S1giS  #NatlPrep
  • #PrepareAthon can help your community discover activities to keep you and your neighbors safe:www.ready.gov/prepare  #NatlPrep
  • Visit our map to find resources & info on preparedness in your community:http://www.ready.gov/america/local/index.html #NatlPrep
  • At your next home owners association meeting share this community preparedness resource: http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Your neighbor may need you when an emergency hits. Plan with your neighbor today. http://1.usa.gov/1WVsAy7#NatlPrep
  • “Community preparedness is a shared responsibility.” Share this resource with your community:http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Did you know? FEMA has online trainings to help get your community prepared. Take them today:http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Almost half of Americans expect to rely on their neighbors after a disaster. Plan today: http://1.usa.gov/1QmIZGG#NatlPrep
  • We can’t do it without YOU! Increase your community’s preparedness by joining #PrepareAthonwww.ready.gov/prepare #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 4:  September 18-24| Individual Preparedness

During this week you will know how to:

  • Understand actions you can take to be prepared for emergency
  • Be aware of specific needs you may have if an emergency strikes like: medication, power needs, eye classes, devices that you may count on, pet needs, etc.
  • Understand safety tips and protective actions you can take before or during a disaster.
  • Download the FEMA app for disaster resources, weather alerts, and safety tips

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

General

  • Be informed, make a plan, build a kit, get involved. Everyone can take steps to prepare for an emergency:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcnCQ_pdVCY #NatlPrep
  • Make disaster preparedness a part of your everyday routine and protect yourself and your loved ones:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcnCQ_pdVCY #NatlPrep
  • Being prepared is part of who you are, and disaster preparation is no different: www.ready.gov/myplan #NatlPrep
  • Take meds? Plan ahead by keeping a copy of your Rx + 1 week supply in a safe place. #NatlPrep
  • Keep a radio & extra batteries handy to listen for info from local officials if you lose power. #NatlPrep
  • Gather your supplies before a hurricane so you won’t find yourself with empty shelves. Supply list:www.ready.gov/kit. #NatlPrep
  • If you rely on public transportation, contact your local emergency management agency about evac info ahead of a hurricane. #NatlPrep
  • Sign up to receive text or e-mail alerts about emergencies like wildfire from your local Office of Emergency Management. #NatlPrep
  • Are you getting your community prepared for a #tornado #hurricane or #wildfire? Add your activity:www.ready.gov/prepare  #NatlPrep
  • Wireless Emergency Alerts can save lives! Be smart. Know your alerts and warnings. Learn more: 1.usa.gov/1jLKAGr #NatlPrep
  • Make sure you know what your insurance policy covers before an emergency: 1.usa.gov/1UGuFAA #NatlPrep
  • There are plenty of ways individuals can get prepared. Here’s 10 ways: bit.ly/22tNNpV #NatlPrep

FEMA App

Safety tips during a disaster

  • Know what to do when roads are flooded: “Turn Around Don’t Drown®! It may save your life!” #NatlPrep
  • If you’re already on “high ground” during a flood, stay where you are. Be prepared by having your supplies already stored. #NatlPrep
  • Wildfires often begin unnoticed. Call 911 if you see a #wildfire! More tips: http://go.usa.gov/3AqSx #NatlPrep
  • You may have to evacuate quickly due to a #hurricane. Learn your evacuation routes & identify where you will stay. #NatlPrep
  • An emergency may knock out power. Prepare by stocking non-perishable food items & water. #NatlPrep
  • During an #earthquake DROP, COVER, & HOLD ON. Share this safety message from @TheRock:https://youtu.be/vRdTaLWrpTE #NatlPrep
  • Know your community’s local #hurricane evacuation plan and identify several evacuation routes for your location. #NatlPrep
  • Don’t risk your family’s safety; follow the instructions of local officials – and if told to evacuate, evacuate! #HurricaneStrong

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 5:  September 25-30| Lead Up To National Day Of Action

During this week you will learn how to:

  • Participate in National PrepareAthon! Day on September 30.
  • Add your preparedness activity to www.ready.gov/prepare.
  • Encourage others to do a preparedness activity and register it on www.ready.gov/prepare.
  • Share images of you and your community doing a preparedness activity.
  • Share stories of how being prepared made a difference using #PrepareAthon.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

Be Counted: Add Your Preparedness Activity

  • Be Counted: Add your emergency preparedness activities to the America’s PrepareAthon! website:www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Join millions of Americans taking action for #PrepareAthon by adding your preparedness activities today:www.ready.gov/prepare
  • How many of the 10 #PrepareAthon activities have you completed? Be sure to register your actions:www.ready.gov/prepare
  • Ready, Set, Go! Register your  preparedness activities now: www.ready.gov/prepare
  • There’s no time like the present to register your preparedness activities: www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon

Take Action: Join Others to do a Preparedness Activity

  • America’s #PrepareAthon has 10 ways to participate. Choose your activity: www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Get the scoop on 10 things you can do to get prepared for an emergency here: http://bit.ly/29Kjc0Q#PrepareAthon
  • Be a part of the millions taking action and getting prepared for emergencies. Join us: www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Join a nationwide emergency preparedness movement and prepare for disasters in your area:www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon
  • As part of America’s #PrepareAthon, we are committed to getting prepared for emergencies. Are you?www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon
  • Help spread the word about #PrepareAthon w/ these promotional materials and toolkits: http://bit.ly/1ROi609
  • National #PrepareAthon Day is Sept. 30. What are you doing to prepare?
  • Assembling emergency supplies is one way to participate in America’s #PrepareAthon! Here are 9 more:http://1.usa.gov/1WgMKnH #PrepareAthon
  • Do you have the FEMA app? It’s preparedness at your fingertips. Download it today! http://1.usa.gov/1CRVzMB#PrepareAthon

Share It: Your Preparedness Story May Inspire Others

  • See how communities across the nation are preparing for #disasters! Visit the #PrepareAthon “stories” page:http://1.usa.gov/1Yb7xsk
  • Extra, extra read all about it! Communities everywhere are getting prepared for emergencies:http://1.usa.gov/1Yb7xsk #PrepareAthon
  • Use #PrepareAthon to share how you’re getting your community involved in preparedness.
  • How has preparing made a difference in your life and/or community?  Tell us your #PrepareAthon story!
  • A community in action tends to stay in action. Share your story about taking action for emergencies using #PrepareAthon.
  • Did preparing in advance help you during a disaster?  Share your experience with #PrepareAthon
  • Built an emergency kit? Created a family communications plan? Tell others what you did using #PrepareAthon.
  • I participated in America’s #PrepareAthon so my community can be prepared for emergencies.
  • Have you taken action? Tell others what you did to prepare for emergencies and how it made a difference using #PrepareAthon.
  • I participated in America’s #PrepareAthon so my community can be prepared for emergencies.
  • “It Started Like Any Other Day” Hear how a disaster changed the lives of these survivors: http://bit.ly/1nwuDXu#PrepareAthon

Take Part: It’s National PrepareAthon! Day

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseCongressional Co-Chairs

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePresidential Proclamation

“OSHA Announces Safety Stand-Down at Worksites Throughout Southeast (Region 4) To Emphasize Response To, Prevention Of Heat-Related Illnesses, Injuries”

Firefox_Screenshot_2016-06-02T00-32-37.584ZU.S. Department of Labor | June 23, 2016

Trade News Release Banner Image

OSHA announces Safety Stand-Down at worksites throughout Southeast
to emphasize response to, prevention of heat-related illnesses, injuries
Thousands of workers overcome by heat illness annually, OSHA reports

ATLANTA – In 2014, 2,630 workers suffered from heat illness while 18 died from heat stroke and related causes on the job – all of which was preventable.

To raise awareness about these dangers, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, employers and trade associations will conduct a one-hour Safety Stand-Down at construction sites and workplaces in eight Southern states from June 27 to July 1, 2016.

Workers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee will stop work voluntarily for one hour at 7 a.m. EDT to conduct safety training focused on how to recognize the symptoms of heat-related illnesses and prevent these illnesses when working in hot weather.

Every year, thousands of workers nationwide suffer from serious heat-related illnesses. OSHA investigations of recent heat-related deaths found a majority involved workers on the job for three or less days – highlighting the need for employers to ensure that new workers become acclimated to the heat when starting or returning to work. Labor-intensive activities in hot weather can increase body temperatures beyond a level that sweating cannot cool normally. Heat illness may manifest initially as heat rash or heat cramps. The illness can quickly elevate to heat exhaustion and then heat stroke without simple prevention steps.

“People who work outdoors in extreme hot weather – in industries such as agriculture, construction, baggage-handling, roofing and landscaping – must be aware of the dangers,” said Kurt Petermeyer, OSHA’s regional administrator for the Southeast. “Employers are responsible for protecting workers from illness or injury when temperatures increase. This safety Stand-Down initiative seeks to educate employers and workers alike. We encourage companies throughout the region to participate.”

For the summer season, OSHA offers tools to assist employers and workers:

  • Heat-illness educational materials in English and Spanish, and a curriculum to be used for workplace training.
  • Online tools such as OSHA worker heat safety tips in a blog, Twitter posts, and at an newly updated heat campaign web page that now includes illustrations of heat exhaustion and heat stroke, an animated video, training resources, and links to an updated heat safety phone app.
  • #WaterRestShade, the official hashtag of the campaign, encourages employers to provide their workers with drinking water, ample breaks, and a shaded area while working outdoors.
  • OSHA continues to work with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to raise awareness on the dangers of working in the heat through its Weather-Ready Nation campaign.

Employers from all states can register for the Stand-Down event at the Associated General Contractors of America Inc. Georgia branch’s website. An informational flyer and toolbox, in English and Spanish, are also available there.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

# # #

Media Contacts:

Michael D’Aquino, 678-237-0630, daquino.michael@dol.gov

Release Number: 16-1177-ATL (170)

“Run, Hide, Fight” – “Surviving An Active Shooter Event”

As much as it pains us all to think about this happening to us, workers need to be informed and taught what to do if this “unfortunate” type of violence ever happens in their workplace.

A new public service announcement in Houston features three strategies to practice in case of a workplace shooting in one of the first safety videos produced as a precaution against active shooters in the wake of the horrific movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo., 10 days ago. Produced by the City of Houston Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and Homeland Security, “RUN. HIDE. FIGHT. Surviving an Active Shooter Event,” is a six-minute video released last week that promotes tips on how to survive a shooting inside the workplace.

“If you are ever to find yourself in the middle of an active shooter event, your survival may depend on whether or not you have a plan,” the narrator says in the video. “The plan doesn’t have to be complicated.”

The video opens with an active shooter beginning to shoot at random employees at a workplace. During the course of the public service announcement, three safety options are presented – run, hide and fight. The video suggests running to be the first option, followed by hiding. Fighting should be considered a “last resort,” according to the narrator.

“Your actions can make a difference for your safety and survival,” the narrator says in the video. “Be aware and be prepared.”

The video is a part of the Ready Houston initiative focusing on regional disaster preparedness, according to Talking Points Memo. The public service announcement has been funded by a grant from the Department of Homeland Security’s Regional Catastrophic Planning Initiative, according to the Houston Chronicle.

The video’s production was not in lieu of the Aurora shooting. The Chronicle reports that filming had wrapped up two weeks prior to the July 20 theater shooting.

“We didn’t release it at the time because we didn’t know it was relevant,” Dennis Storemski, head of the Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and Homeland Security Department, told the Houston Chronicle. “Now it is.”

Source: Houston Chronicle

 

“It’s That Time of Year For Tornado Safety Training – “Are You Ready?”

Frightening video of the Destructive Tornado in Tuscaloosa – Alabama 4-27-2011

Tornados are nature’s violent storms that appear suddenly and without warning. Tornadoes can strike anywhere at anytime, therefore, you need to be ready, know the drill and act quickly.

Download this Red Cross®  : Tornado Safety – Red Cross .pdf information booklet!

Know the Difference – What is a Tornado Watch? What is a Tornado Warning?

To identify the hazard level and what actions you should take, become familiar with the terms Tornado Watch vs. Tornado Warning.

Tornado Watch indicates conditions are favorable for a tornado and a tornado is possible.

Tornado Warning indicates that a tornado has been sighted or seen by the National Weather Service Doppler Radar and may be headed your way. TAKE COVER IMMEDIATELY!

Preparing for a Tornado – Does your family have a Tornado Plan?

Develop a safety plan for home, work, school and when outdoors. In buildings where your family spends time, know where the designated shelters are located. Make sure your family reviews and practices the plan at least once a year and especially on days when severe weather is forecast for your area. If you or a family member are disabled, develop an alternative plan and be sure to include items in your supply kit that will meet their special needs for at least a week or longer. Download “How To Prepare For A Tornado” PDF Guidebook Here:  http://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/1409003506195-52740fd2983079a211d041f7aea6b85d/how_to_prepare_tornado_033014_508.pdf

Open buildings (shopping malls, gymnasiums or civic centers)
• Try to get into the restroom or an interior hallway. If there is no time to go anywhere else, seek shelter right where you are. Try to get up against something that will support or deflect falling debris. Protect your head by covering it with your arms.

Automobiles

• NEVER try to outrun a tornado. Get out of your vehicle and try to find shelter inside a sturdy building. A culvert or ditch can provide shelter if a substantial building is not nearby – lie down flat and cover your head with your hands. DO NOT take shelter under a highway overpass or bridge. Debris could get blown underneath the structure or the structure could be destroyed.

Outdoors

• Try to find shelter immediately in the nearest substantial building. If no buildings are close, lie down flat in a ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands.

Mobile homes

• DO NOT stay in a mobile home. You should leave immediately and seek shelter inside a nearby sturdy building or lie down in a ditch away from your home, covering your head with your hands. Mobile homes are extremely unsafe during tornadoes.

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