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“Miller Fall Protection Safety Webinar” & “Fall Clearance Calculator App”

Miller Fall Protection Webinar

When working at height, it is important to know your fall clearance and swing fall, whether using a shock-absorbing lanyard or self-retracting lifeline. Calculating your fall clearance and swing fall is critical to your safety. The Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App gives workers who work at heights, the ability to quickly calculate the required fall clearance for Shock Absorbing Lanyards and Self-Retracting Lifelines, including swing fall.

Download the New Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App by Honeywell : Download link – https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/miller-fall-clearance-calculator/id971198656?mt=8

Miller Fall App

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“Water, Rest & Shade” – “Working Outdoors & Indoors In High Temperature Conditions”

Firefox_Screenshot_2016-06-02T00-32-37.584Z

HEAT ILLNESS CAN BE DEADLY.

The body normally cools itself by sweating. During hot weather, especially with high humidity, sweating isn’t enough. Body temperature can rise to dangerous levels if you don’t drink enough water and rest in the shade. You can suffer from heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

In 2014 alone, 2,630 workers suffered from heat illness and 18 died from heat stroke and related causes on the job. Heat illnesses and deaths are preventable.

Employers must protect workers from excessive heat.

Under OSHA law, employers are responsible for providing workplaces free of known safety hazards. This includes protecting workers from extreme heat. An employer with workers exposed to high temperatures should establish a complete heat illness prevention program.

  • Provide workers with water, rest and shade.
  • Allow new or returning workers to gradually increase workloads and take more frequent breaks as they acclimatize, or build a tolerance for working in the heat.
  • Plan for emergencies and train workers on prevention.
  • Monitor workers for signs of illness.

 

Heat Exhaustion

Dizziness Dizziness
Headache Headache
Sweaty Skin Sweaty Skin
Weakness Weakness
Cramps Cramps
Nausea, vomiting Nausea, vomiting
Fast heart beat Fast heart beat

Heat Stroke

Red, hot, dry skin Red, hot, dry skin
High temperature High temperature
Confusion Confusion
ConvulsionsConvulsions
FaintingFainting

To prevent heat related illness and fatalities:

  • Drink water every 15 minutes, even if you are not thirsty.
  • Rest in the shade to cool down.
  • Wear a hat and light-colored clothing.
  • Learn the signs of heat illness and what to do in an emergency.
  • Keep an eye on fellow workers.
  • “Easy does it” on your first days of work in the heat. You need to get used to it.

Working in full sunlight can increase heat index values by 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep this in mind and plan additional precautions for working in these conditions.

Who is affected?

Any worker exposed to hot and humid conditions is at risk of heat illness, especially those doing heavy work tasks or using bulky protective clothing and equipment. Some workers might be at greater risk than others if they have not built up a tolerance to hot conditions, including new workers, temporary workers, or those returning to work after a week or more off. All workers are at risk during a heat wave.

Industries most affected by heat-related illness are: construction; trade, transportation and utilities; agriculture; building, grounds maintenance; landscaping services; and support activities for oil and gas operations.

What to do if a worker becomes ill?

  • Call a supervisor for help. If a supervisor is not available, call 911.
  • Have someone stay with the worker until help arrives.

Educational Resources:
Fact Sheets / Posters / Training Material

To view and/or order heat-related documents, visit OSHA’s Publications page. Clicking “order now” will place the item in a virtual cart on the right side of the screen. To order multiple copies, please call 1-800-321-OSHA (6742).

Thumbnail image of publication cover - Water. Rest. Shade.

Illustrated, Low-Literacy Fact Sheets

Construction and Agriculture: Available in English (PDF*) and Spanish (PDF*)**

Oil & Gas and Construction: Available in English (PDF*) and Spanish (PDF*)**

Thumbnail image of publication cover - Water. Rest. Shade.

Worksite Training Poster

Educational Poster to be used for training on heat illness symptoms and prevention.

Available in English (PDF*) and Spanish (PDF*)**

Thumbnail image of publication cover - Water. Rest. Shade.

Community Poster

Awareness poster with heat illness prevention messages and OSHA contact information.

Available in English (PDF*) and Spanish (PDF*)**

Thumbnail image of publication cover - Water. Rest. Shade.

OSHA Heat Illness Prevention Training Guide

A guide for employers to carry out heat safety training, with lesson plans (tailgate or toolbox talks).

Available in English (PDF*) and Spanish (PDF*)

Thumbnail image of publication cover - Water. Rest. Shade.

Using the Heat Index: A Guide for Employers

Guide to planning for heat at the workplace and taking precautions based on heat index.

Available in English (PDF*) and Spanish (PDF*)

Thumbnail image of publication cover - Water. Rest. Shade.

Heat Stress QuickCard™

Small, double-sided card to learn what precautions to take.

Available in English (PDF*), Spanish (PDF*) and in Vietnamese (PDF*)

Thumbnail image of publication cover - Water. Rest. Shade.

Outreach Wallet Card

Two-sided business card with message on one side and heat illness symptoms on the other. QR Code links to OSHA Heat Illness Prevention Website to access more materials.

Can be kept in wallet to use in event of an emergency and great to hand out at worksites.

Available in English (PDF*) and Spanish (PDF*) and NEW Portuguese (PDF*)

Thumbnail image of publication cover - Water. Rest. Shade.

OSHA’s Heat Smartphone App

App calculates heat index for current location and provides guidance to prevent illness.

Additional Resources for Workers and Employers

Protecting Workers from the Effects of Heat Fact Sheet (PDF*). OSHA Fact Sheet (Publication 3743), (August 2014).

Protecting Workers from Heat Illness (PDF*). OSHA-NIOSH Heat Illness Info Sheet, (2011).

Occupational Heat Exposure. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page.

Protecting Yourself From Heat Stress. NIOSH Fast Facts (Publication 2010-114), (April 2010).

Heat Stress. NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topics.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Extreme Heat. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Emergency Preparedness and Response.

Beat the Heat: Heat Safety Resources. National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Weather Service.

California Campaign to Protect Outdoor Workers From Heat Illness.*** Cal/OSHA.

Heat Illness Prevention.*** Cal/OSHA, Division of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH).

Heat Illness Prevention eTool.*** Cal/OSHA.

Quick Facts for Employees (PDF) (English and Spanish). Oregon OSHA (QF-008 OR-OSHA).

Outdoor Heat Exposure (OHE, Heat Stress).*** Washington State Department of Labor and Industries.

Website and “Don’t Fry Day”. National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention (NCSCP).

Sun Safety. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Skin Cancer.


**These resources were adapted from California OSHA’s heat campaign materials.

***NOTE: California and Washington state have their own heat illness prevention standards; these materials reflect the requirements in those standards.

“New NIOSH Smart Phone App Addresses Ladder Safety”

Contact: Christina Spring (202) 245-0633

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) announces the availability of a new Ladder Safety smart phone application (app). This new app uses visual and audio signals to make it easier for workers using extension ladders to check the angle the ladder is positioned at, as well as access useful tips for using extension ladders safely. The app is available for free download for both iPhone and Android devices.

Falls from ladders are a common source of preventable construction injuries. Misjudging the ladder angle is a significant risk factor for a fall. If the ladder is set too steep it is more likely to fall back or away during use, and if it is set too shallow then the bottom can slide out.

“The ladder safety app is an innovative way to help keep workers safe and a tool to reduce these preventable injuries,” said NIOSH Director John Howard, M.D. “The development of this smart phone app also demonstrates how we are constantly working to make science-based practical information accessible to workers and employers in a way they need and can easily use.”

The app provides feedback to the user on positioning the extension ladder at the optimal angle. It also provides references and a safety guide for extension ladder selection, inspection, accessorizing, and use. It was developed with input from the ANSI A14 committee on Ladder Safety, the American Ladder Institute, and other stakeholders.

NIOSH collaborated with DSFederal on the final development and testing of the app before release. The app is based on a multimodal inclination indicator for ladder positioning that has been recently awarded a US patent. To learn more and download the Ladder Safety app visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/falls/ and to learn about the campaign to prevent falls in construction go to http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/construction/stopfalls.html.

NIOSH is the federal agency that conducts research and makes recommendations for preventing work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths. For more information about our work visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/.

  

“New USDA ‘FoodKeeper’ App: Your Tool for Smart Food Storage”

Pretty neat new app from the USDA.

Nationalsafety's Weblog

My wife and I just got through watching a documentary entitled “Just Eat it“. It talks about the amount of food that is wasted in the US (almost 40%) and the world (almost 30%). That means that of the food that is grown, raised, prepared, packaged, etc… 40% of it ends up being discarded.

By far the worst culprit is the individual household. We over-purchase (Thanks Costco) and end up throwing a lot of the food away, thinking it is no longer good to eat. Part of it is the confusion has to do with consumers not understanding the dates on the products that they purchase. There is, of course, the “sell by” date which only means that the store should try to sell it by this date to ensure that the consumer has a reasonable shelf life let on the item after he or she gets it…

View original post 280 more words

“Top 10 Safety Apps For EHS Professionals”


Paul Colangelo, National Compliance Director for “ClickSafety” evaluated more than 150 Environmental Health and Safety apps available on a number of platforms in order to determine which ones were most valuable to workers.

Colangelo had a number of factors he took into account, including: cost, size of the app, content, design, subscription model, registration requirements, and whether or not the app has an offline mode.

Colangelo reviewed both free and fee-based apps during his talk. Many regulatory agencies like OSHA have developed apps such as the Heat Safety Tool, which is designed to not only calculate heat index, but also to identify signs and symptoms of heat-related illness, first-aid treatment and contact information for the agency. 

NIOSH offers apps that address chemical safety, ladder safety, lift safety and several others. Beyond OSHA and NIOSH, agencies and associations such as ANSI, AHA and NFPA have developed apps.

Colangelo suggested that OSH professionals use the following criteria when selecting apps:

device brand; device type; flash capability; industry; classification; source and accuracy of content; cost; malware and security concerns; ads. 

Colangelo’s’s session was recorded during Safety 2015 and is available for purchase on http://learn.asse.org.

Dave Weber from “Safety Awakenings” reviews new safety apps for his website on a weekly basis and recommends the following apps from his weekly reviews. 

OSHA Heat Safety Tool

NIOSH Ladder Safety

NIOSH Pocket Guide to Hazardous Chemicals

Pocket First Aid

Fall Clear Lite

Electrical Safety Tests

Incident Cost Calculator

AccuWeather

ILO Ergonomic Checkpoints

I-Auditor

Note: The apps referred to in this story came from the Safety Awakenings Website. See the following link For more information: http://www.safetyawakenings.com/apps/

 

“Protect Your Workers From Summer Heat Stress”

image

For more more information and to download the poster above, visit the following link:http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/heatstress/infographic.html

In Some Parts of the U.S., Today And Many More Days This Summer, Will Be A Very Hot Day. Get The New Revised iOS OSHA Heat Safety Tool by clicking On Link Below. Available For Android Too. https://lnkd.in/bYY2d8g

  
 

 

“New NIOSH Smart Phone App Addresses Ladder Safety”

Contact: Christina Spring (202) 245-0633

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) announces the availability of a new Ladder Safety smart phone application (app). This new app uses visual and audio signals to make it easier for workers using extension ladders to check the angle the ladder is positioned at, as well as access useful tips for using extension ladders safely. The app is available for free download for both iPhone and Android devices.

Falls from ladders are a common source of preventable construction injuries. Misjudging the ladder angle is a significant risk factor for a fall. If the ladder is set too steep it is more likely to fall back or away during use, and if it is set too shallow then the bottom can slide out.

“The ladder safety app is an innovative way to help keep workers safe and a tool to reduce these preventable injuries,” said NIOSH Director John Howard, M.D. “The development of this smart phone app also demonstrates how we are constantly working to make science-based practical information accessible to workers and employers in a way they need and can easily use.”

The app provides feedback to the user on positioning the extension ladder at the optimal angle. It also provides references and a safety guide for extension ladder selection, inspection, accessorizing, and use. It was developed with input from the ANSI A14 committee on Ladder Safety, the American Ladder Institute, and other stakeholders.

NIOSH collaborated with DSFederal on the final development and testing of the app before release. The app is based on a multimodal inclination indicator for ladder positioning that has been recently awarded a US patent. To learn more and download the Ladder Safety app visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/falls/ and to learn about the campaign to prevent falls in construction go to http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/construction/stopfalls.html.

NIOSH is the federal agency that conducts research and makes recommendations for preventing work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths. For more information about our work visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/.

  

“Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App & Fall Arrest PPE Safety Webinar”

Miller Fall Protection Webinar

When working at height, it is important to know your fall clearance and swing fall, whether using a shock-absorbing lanyard or self-retracting lifeline. Calculating your fall clearance and swing fall is critical to your safety. The Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App gives workers at height the ability to quickly calculate the required fall clearance for Shock Absorbing Lanyards and Self-Retracting Lifelines, including swing fall.

Download New Miller Fall Clearance Calculator by Honeywell : Download link:https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/miller-fall-clearance-calculator/id971198656?mt=8

Miller Fall App

Nationwide’s “Make Safe Happen” – Dedicated To Children’s Safety – #MakeSafeHappen

Safety took center stage during Super Bowl XLIX thanks to Nationwide’s “Make Safe Happen” commercial.

The spot, which featured a little boy who died from a preventable accident, was designed to be jarring in order to “start a conversation,” Nationwide said.

“I’ll never learn to ride a bike. Or get cooties. I’ll never learn to fly. Or travel the world with my best friend. And I won’t ever get married,” the child says. “I couldn’t grow up because I died from an accident.”

Nationwide released a statement after the ad aired in response to the strong audience reaction:

Preventable injuries around the home are the leading cause of childhood deaths in America. Most people don’t know that. Nationwide ran an ad during the Super Bowl that started a fierce conversation. The sole purpose of this message was to start a conversation, not sell insurance. We want to build awareness of an issue that is near and dear to all of us—the safety and well-being of our children. We knew the ad would spur a variety of reactions. In fact, thousands of people visited MakeSafeHappen.com, a new website to help educate parents and caregivers with information and resources in an effort to make their homes safer and avoid a potential injury or death. Nationwide has been working with experts for more than 60 years to make homes safer. While some did not care for the ad, we hope it served to begin a dialogue to make safe happen for children everywhere.

Read the rest of the story here: http://ehstoday.com/safety/safety-stars-super-bowl-xlix

Read about the iOS  App here:

MakeSafeHappen on the App Store on iTunes 2015-02-04 16-24-33

Source: EHS Today & Nationwide Insurance®

“iPhone App Helps Illinois Farm Workers To Locate Nearest Grain Rescue Tube”

More than 900 grain bin-related deaths have occurred in the U.S. since 1964, but now there’s an app to help lessen that number, according to Illinois Corn.

The Illinois Grain Rescue Tube Locator app, built by the Illinois Corn Marketing Board and the Grain and Feed Association of Illinois, was designed as a way for rescue workers to more easily locate farmers who were stuck in grain bins. The app is powered by GPS technology and allows for rescue crews to get to the farmer more quickly than in the past.

As of now, the free app has a map for Illinois grain rescue tubes. In the future, other states may design similar databases.

Click link to download App! : https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/illinois-grain-rescue-tube/id886702834?mt=8

Illinois Grain Rescue Tube Locator on the App Store on iTunes 2015-01-24 14-35-58

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