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“Why Lock-Out, Tag-Out IS Vitally Important” #LOTO #Safety

Caution: Somewhat Graphic Photo – Note: This Photo is the property of Jack Benton, and may not be used without written consent!

Why LOTO is Vitally Important 3

Why LOTO is Vitally Important 

Note: The photo above is not intended for page views or shock value as I don’t believe that those methods truly teach you anything in and of themselves. I don’t know the particulars of the above accident, but I do know that the lack of a proper lock out – tag out (control of hazardous energy) policy and procedure contributed to the accident.

This is always on OSHA’s Top 10 Violations list on a yearly basis, typically coming in at number 2 each year in the total number of times cited. Please use the training information below to keep your employees safe and involved in this process at your workplace.

Remember to AUDIT your procedures more than once per year. LOTO can be a difficult procedure especially when your job or facility has large manufacturing equipment such as a multi-employee operated mile long paper mill versus many single employee operated machines.

Hopefully, the Temp Worker Without LOTO Training who lost his life on the first day of his new job and the LOTO Webinar below, as well as the other resources further down the page will help you to put together an appropriate LOTO policy and procedure for your company.

Ninety minutes into his first day on the first job of his life, Day Davis was called over to help at Palletizer No. 4 at the Bacardi bottling plant in Jacksonville, Fla. What happened next is an all-too-common story for temp workers working in blue-collar industries. Read the investigation: http://www.propublica.org/article/tem..

The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) Full Webinar 2016

What is hazardous energy?

Energy sources including electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or other sources in machines and equipment can be hazardous to workers. During the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment, the unexpected startup or release of stored energy can result in serious injury or death to workers.

What are the harmful effects of hazardous energy?

Workers servicing or maintaining machines or equipment may be seriously injured or killed if hazardous energy is not properly controlled. Injuries resulting from the failure to control hazardous energy during maintenance activities can be serious or fatal! Injuries may include electrocution, burns, crushing, cutting, lacerating, amputating, or fracturing body parts, and others.

  • A steam valve is automatically turned on burning workers who are repairing a downstream connection in the piping.
  • A jammed conveyor system suddenly releases, crushing a worker who is trying to clear the jam.
  • Internal wiring on a piece of factory equipment electrically shorts, shocking worker who is repairing the equipment.

Craft workers, electricians, machine operators, and laborers are among the 3 million workers who service equipment routinely and face the greatest risk of injury. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation.

What can be done to control hazardous energy?

Failure to control hazardous energy accounts for nearly 10 percent of the serious accidents in many industries. Proper lockout/tagout (LOTO) practices and procedures safeguard workers from hazardous energy releases. OSHA’s Lockout/Tagout Fact Sheet* describes the practices and procedures necessary to disable machinery or equipment to prevent hazardous energy release. The OSHA standard for The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) (29 CFR 1910.147) for general industry outlines measures for controlling different types of hazardous energy. The LOTO standard establishes the employer’s responsibility to protect workers from hazardous energy. Employers are also required to train each worker to ensure that they know, understand, and are able to follow the applicable provisions of the hazardous energy control procedures:

  • Proper lockout/tagout (LOTO) practices and procedures safeguard workers from the release of hazardous energy. The OSHA standard for The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) (29 CFR 1910.147) for general industry, outlines specific action and procedures for addressing and controlling hazardous energy during servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment. Employers are also required to train each worker to ensure that they know, understand, and are able to follow the applicable provisions of the hazardous energy control procedures. Workers must be trained in the purpose and function of the energy control program and have the knowledge and skills required for the safe application, usage and removal of the energy control devices.
  • All employees who work in an area where energy control procedure(s) are utilized need to be instructed in the purpose and use of the energy control procedure(s), especially prohibition against attempting to restart or reenergize machines or other equipment that are locked or tagged out.
  • All employees who are authorized to lockout machines or equipment and perform the service and maintenance operations need to be trained in recognition of applicable hazardous energy sources in the workplace, the type and magnitude of energy found in the workplace, and the means and methods of isolating and/or controlling the energy.
  • Specific procedures and limitations relating to tagout systems where they are allowed.
  • Retraining of all employees to maintain proficiency or introduce new or changed control methods.

OSHA’s Lockout/Tagout Fact Sheet* describes the practices and procedures necessary to disable machinery or equipment to prevent the release of hazardous energy.

The control of hazardous energy is also addressed in a number of other OSHA standards, including Marine Terminals (1917 Subpart C), Safety and Health Regulations for Longshoring (1918 Subpart G), Safety and Health Regulations for Construction; Electrical (1926 Subpart K), Concrete and Masonry Construction (1926 Subpart Q), Electric Power Transmission and Distribution (1926 Subpart V), and General Industry; Electrical (1910 Subpart S), Special Industries (1910 Subpart R), and Electric Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution (1910.269).

Highlights
  • Lockout-Tagout Interactive Training Program. OSHA eTool. Interactive tool to provide the user with an in-depth understanding of the LOTO standard, with three components: Tutorial, Hot Topics, and Case Studies.
  • Construction. OSHA eTool. Helps workers identify and control the hazards, including electrical hazards, that commonly cause the most serious construction injuries.
    • Electrical Incidents. Landing page for Electrical Incidents subpage of the Construction eTool, which identifies electrical hazards and recommends preventive measures.
  • Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution. OSHA eTool, (January, 2010). Assists workers in identifying and controlling workplace hazards.
Lockout/Tagout Concepts
Lockout/Tagout Program

Example elements of a lockout/tagout (LOTO) program are described in the OSHA standard for the control of hazardous energy (29 CFR 1910.147), along with these additional references.

Other Resources
Training
  • Lockout-Tagout Interactive Training Program. OSHA eTool. Interactive tool to provide the user with an in-depth understanding of the LOTO standard, with three components: Tutorial, Hot Topics, and Case Studies.
    • Case Studies. Presents a series of case studies for review, followed by related questions. Each of the case studies is based on descriptions of LOTO inspections derived from compliance interpretations, court decisions, Review Commission decisions, and inspection files.
  • Small Business Handbook (PDF). OSHA Publication 2209, (2005). Handbook is provided to owners, proprietors and managers of small businesses to assure the safety and health of workers.
  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD) Research Publications-11. Brief publication providing an overview of lockout/tagout, California laws and regulations, and training materials.
Additional Information
  • Fatality and Catastrophe Investigation Summaries. OSHA. Enables the user to search the text of Accident Investigation Summaries (OSHA-170 form) for words that may be contained in the text of the abstract or accident description.
  • Z244 Committee Information. American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE).
  • Safety Alert: Control of Hazardous Energy – Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO) Procedures in Shipyard Employment*. OSHA and Shipbuilders Council of America, National Shipbuilding Research Program, and American Shipbuilding Association Alliances (now the Shipbuilding Group Alliance) and the American Industrial Hygiene Association and American Society of Safety Engineers Alliances, (February 2009). Safety Alert Fact Sheet that provides information on how to protect employees from hazardous energy. Also available in Spanish*.
  • Safety Alert: Electrocution and Shock Hazards in Shipyard Employment*. OSHA and Shipbuilders Council of America, National Shipbuilding Research Program, and American Shipbuilding Association Alliances (now the Shipbuilding Group Alliance) and the American Industrial Hygiene Association and American Society of Safety Engineers Alliances, (February 2008). Safety Alert Fact Sheet that provides information on how to protect employees from electrocution and shock hazards. Also available in Spanish*.
Related Safety and Health Topics
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“Miller Fall Protection Safety Webinar” & “Fall Clearance Calculator App”

Miller Fall Protection Webinar

When working at height, it is important to know your fall clearance and swing fall, whether using a shock-absorbing lanyard or self-retracting lifeline. Calculating your fall clearance and swing fall is critical to your safety. The Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App gives workers who work at heights, the ability to quickly calculate the required fall clearance for Shock Absorbing Lanyards and Self-Retracting Lifelines, including swing fall.

Download the New Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App by Honeywell : Download link – https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/miller-fall-clearance-calculator/id971198656?mt=8

Miller Fall App

“Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App & Fall Arrest PPE Safety Webinar”

Miller Fall Protection Webinar

When working at height, it is important to know your fall clearance and swing fall, whether using a shock-absorbing lanyard or self-retracting lifeline. Calculating your fall clearance and swing fall is critical to your safety. The Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App gives workers at height the ability to quickly calculate the required fall clearance for Shock Absorbing Lanyards and Self-Retracting Lifelines, including swing fall.

Download New Miller Fall Clearance Calculator by Honeywell : Download link:https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/miller-fall-clearance-calculator/id971198656?mt=8

Miller Fall App

Webinar – “Dealing With The “Fix And Forget” Safety Mentality”

Source: BLR Safety Daily Advisor

http://safetydailyadvisor.blr.com/

In the world of safety consulting, it is often said “we want to work ourselves out of a job by providing our employees the safest environment possible.” However, what happens when you actually make great improvements in safety and the employer decides you have done your job and lays you off?

What happens to the safety program you helped establish and what are the long-term repercussions of such an action?

What you will learn:

  • Learn how the “fix and forget it” mentality evolves in a company
  • The pros and cons of this mentality
  • Explore creative solutions for getting safety programs in place
  • Hear best practices for keeping safety programs functioning and growing.

Free EPA Compliance Webinar‏ – July 10, 2014 – 2:00 PM ET

Looking for an easy way to stay on top of environmental regulations? Need to know when your state has additional requirements? You are invited on July 10, 2014 @ 2PM ET to take a tour of the easiest and most comprehensive online resource for state and federal environmental compliance Enviro.BLR.com.Sign up now!

One-Stop Resource to State and Federal Environmental Regs

Enviro.BLR.com covers a myriad of topics for air, water, waste, and emergency preparedness regulations. And theyre delivered in Plain English!

  • Air Permitting, Risk Management Plans, hazardous air pollutants, and New Source Review
  • Water Stormwater, wastewater, NPDES, wetlands, and drinking water
  • Waste Hazardous, solid, and universal waste, RCRA training, biennial reports, and used oil management
  • Emergency preparedness SPCC plans, EPCRA, and emergency preparedness plans

Enviro.BLR.com Gives You Tools and Training that Saves You Time!

Don’t miss out on this FREE webinar on July 10 to check out features that will save you hours in research and prep time.

Thousands of guidance documents and online tools Checklists, sample plans, and forms at your fingertips.

Training materials High quality customizable PowerPoint presentations for all of your required environmental training, including hazard communication, SPCC, stormwater, RCRA, and more!

“Ask the Experts” Have a compliance question and cant call EPA? You dont have to ask US. Our team of in-house experts is here to help you make sense of what you need to do to follow the rules.

Sign up now and save your seat.

OSHA’s Temporary Worker Initiative: 2014 OSHA Webinar Series, Part I

Eric Conn, Chair of Epstein Becker Green’s OSHA Practice Group, presents a five-part webinar program for employers facing the daunting task of complying with OSHA’s numerous federal and state occupational safety and health standards and regulations.

Part I of the 2014 OSHA webinar series will focus on OSHA’s Temporary Worker Initiative, enforcement issues and data related to this work relationship, and recommendations and strategies for managing safety and health issues related to a temporary workforce.

Companies are expected to employ many more temporary workers as the Affordable Care Act is implemented, particularly when the “Employer Mandate” kicks in, which will require employers with 50 or more workers to provide affordable coverage to employees who work at least 30 hours per week. With this anticipated increase in the use of temporary workers, along with recent reports of temporary workers suffering fatal workplace injuries on their first days on a new job, OSHA will make temporary worker safety a top priority in 2014 and has already launched a Temporary Worker Initiative.

If you have questions regarding this event, please contact Kiirsten Lederer at
(212) 351-4668, or
klederer@ebglaw.com.

 

Upcoming Webinars

Part II: OSHA’s Severe Violator Enforcement Program
Tuesday, June 10, 2014 at 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (EDT)

Part III: Preparing for and Managing an OSHA Inspection
Wednesday, September 17, 2014 at 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (EDT)

Part IV: OSHA’s Multi-Employer Worksite Policy
Thursday, November 13, 2014 at 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (EST)

Part V: 2015 OSHA Forecast
Wednesday, December 10, 2014 at 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM (EST)

  • For additional information on OSHA-related matters, please visit Epstein Becker Green’s OSHA Law Update blog, which recently reached its 100th post milestone.

Source: OSHA Law Update Blog®

Defining Risk In Process Safety Management

Process safety is intended to prevent unwanted conditions or releases of hazardous chemicals, especially into locations that could expose employees and communities to serious health hazards.
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Free Live Webinar – August 21, 2013 – “Building a Fall Protection Plan and a Safer Workplace”

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Free Live Webinar
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
2 p.m. ET / 11 a.m. PT
Duration: 60 Minutes

Join us for this EHS Today and New Equipment Digest Webinar

Building a Fall Protection Plan and a Safer Workplace

Register now for this free live webinar : http://link.pmemanuf.com/u.d?I4Gr3R6hUMSpWS8BdpV8I=541

Falls are among the most hazardous workplace dangers tracked by insurance companies and government regulators. Developing a comprehensive fall protection plan to address workplace hazards is of critical importance both for the safety of employees and the company’s bottom line.

This webinar will help companies write a detailed, site-specific fall protection plan that addresses their fall protection goals. Companies will learn how to identify which fall protection system best fits their specific application, how the chosen system will integrate into their workplace to ultimately keep the workplace safer, and how to prepare a rescue plan in the event that something goes wrong.

The presentation will expand to include training and inspection requirements and show that with the right education, training, awareness and equipment, the workplace can be a safer environment for everyone.

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Free GHS Webinar Hosted by OSHA and SCHC July 25, 2013 – 1:00 PM EDT

OSHA Hosts a Free GHS (Globally Harmonized System) Webinar

GHS HAZCOM Free WebinarOSHA will present a free webinar on the Globally Harmonized System titled “Hazard Communication 2012:  One Year of Implementation”  starting at 1:00 PM EDT on Thursday July 25, 2013.

The webinar is designed to answer many of the questions that OSHA has received during the first year of the implementation of the revised Hazard Communication standard.  Be sure to register early for the free OSHA GHS HAZCOM webinar.  Once you have registered, you will have the opportunity to submit questions that will be answered by OSHA representatives Jennifer H. Lawless and Kathy Landkrohn at the conclusion of the webinar.

This webinar will focus on the following updates to the HAZCOM standard:

  • Classification
  • Labeling
  • Safety Data Sheets
  • Training
  • How manufacturers, importers, distributors, and employers can meet the compliance requirements during the transition period

Under the new Hazard Communication Standard (HAZCOM), employers must conduct training for workers on the new labeling requirements and safety data sheet format by December 1, 2013.  OSHA has aligned its HAZCOM standard with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals.  The GHS update is intended to provide a common approach to classifying chemicals and communicating hazard information on labels and safety data sheets.

OSHA has developed several resources available to help employers during the implementation phase of the revised HAZCOM standard.  OSHA’s Hazard Communication Web Page contains documents that explain the changes to the HAZCOM standard, a HAZCOM fact sheet, a review of the HAZCOM training requirements, new HAZCOM quick cards, and information on the new GHS Pictograms.

Register for OSHA’s free HAZCOM GHS Webinar

The OSHA Training Center at Chabot-Las Positas Community College District is authorized by OSHA to deliver their safety training courses for construction, general industry, maritime, and Cal/OSHA throughout California, Arizona, Hawaii, Nevada, Guam, and American Samoa.  Visit our website at http://www.osha4you.com or contact us at866-936-6742 for additional information.

Free Webinar – 1/30/2013 @12:00 PM CDT – How to Predict and Prevent Workplace Injuries: The Past, Present, and Future

How to Predict and Prevent Workplace Injuries:
The Past, Present, and Future
Wednesday, January 30, 12:00 p.m. Central Time

 

Learn how companies are using advanced analytics on their safety data to predict and prevent workplace injuries. Griffin Schultz, General Manager of Predictive Solutions Corporation (formerly DBO2) and Dr. Raghu Arunachalam, Global Director at Industrial Scientific Corporation, will review the past — how research led to the design and testing of safety prediction models; present — how the most recently produced predictive model has been used to predict and prevent injuries over the last year; and the future — where they see workplace injury prediction and prevention going in the next 3 to 5 years.

 

Presenters

 

Raghu Arunachalam, Ph.D., Director,
Emerging Technologies, Industrial Scientific Corporation

 

Prior to joining Industrial Scientific, Arunachalam was a Research Faculty member at Carnegie Mellon University‘s Institute for Software Research. There, he spent time developing artificial intelligence algorithms for real-world applications. He has over 15 years of experience in using advanced and predictive analytics to solve business problems. Arunachalam’s focus at Industrial Scientific is to apply these techniques to save lives in the workplace. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Warwick, United Kingdom.

 

Griffin Schultz, General Manager,
Predictive Solutions Corporation

 

Schultz is responsible for all aspects of the Predictive Solutions Corporation business, a wholly owned subsidiary of Industrial Scientific Corporation. With a vision of ending death on the job by the end of this century, Predictive Solutions is focused on its strategy of employing advanced analytics to predict workplace injuries, so that they can be prevented. In addition to his experience in safety, Schultz has extensive expertise in leveraging technology and software across business functions to drive game-changing results. Schultz earned an MBA from The Wharton School at The University of Pennsylvania and resides near the company headquarters just outside Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

 

Kyle W. Morrison, Safety+Health magazine
 
Kyle W. Morrison, senior associate editor, covers occupational safety and workplace safety regulation for Safety+Health magazine. He will moderate the session.
Sponsors:

Presenters:

name

Raghu Arunachalam,
Industrial Scientific Corporation

 

 

name

Griffin Schultz,
Predictive Solutions Corporation

 

 

Moderator:

Kyle Morrison

Kyle W. Morrison,
Safety+Health

 

 

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