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“House Fires Caused By Storage of 9 Volt, AA Batteries In Junk Drawers & Other Places Rising”

* If You Know of a Fire Incident in Your Town Caused by 9 Volt, AA or AAA Battery Storage in a Home, Please Note it in the comments Section of this Post! Thank You!

Click here for the recent Hastings, Nebraska House Fire on January 16, 2017

If you are storing loose 9 volt or AA or other batteries in a kitchen drawer or a “junk” drawer in your home, watch how you store them. Above all don’t store them loose and rolling around with other metal items, like small tools, paper clips, nails and more of the lovely mix of things we keep in our junk drawers. You also don’t want them loose and rolling around in other items like a camera case, luggage, etc.

All you need to have happened is for a metal object like steel wool or a paper clip short out across the top of a 9-volt battery and ignite paper or other easily ignited materials and you’ll have a potential disaster in your home. As indicated in the YouTube Video below, it doesn’t take much to heat a metallic object or cause a spark in order to start a fire. *Please Do Not Do This At Home*

What to do with a 9 Volt Battery

I teach safety to the public, common sense tells most of us what to do in situations that could become life threatening. I speak to 50-60 people at a time about fire safety in the home on a monthly basis. I get the same reaction from every group when I hold up a 9-volt battery and announce that it is a fire hazard and it could burn down your house.

They all kinda look at me funny, as if to ask, “Did you just say a 9-volt battery could burn down my house?” That look is almost comical.

Q: Where do you store your batteries?

A: Throw them in  in a “junk” drawer

I then hold up a brillo pad. (just one example)

Q: What do you do with the batteries when you are done with them?

A: Throw them in the trash.

A 9-volt battery (see video) is a fire hazard because the positive and negative posts are on top, right next to one another. If this comes in contact with anything metal (aluminum foil, brillo, etc…) it will spark, and if there is a fuel for this spark you will have a fire. (fire needs heat, fuel and oxygen to burn) To test this theory, put a 9-volt battery or a couple of AA batteries in your pocket with some loose change or your key chain full of keys, (use common sense) this will bring on a whole new meaning to the words, Hot Pants.

When you dispose of this type of battery (positive and negative on top) Make sure it is safely wrapped in electrical tape or something to keep it separated from anything else that may come in contact with it. A small box or zip lock bag if kept in a junk drawer should suffice.  I have seen in some stores now that the manufacturers are now packaging them with plastic caps. If you need to purchase a 9-volt battery try to find those that are packaged in this manner.

Try to be just as diligent with AA or AAA batteries. Keep them in their original packaging if stored in a “junk drawer”. Don’t let them roll around freely with all the other wonderful miscellaneous items we unknowingly toss in the drawer and don’t think twice about it.

 

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Control of Hazardous Energy: “Why Lock-Out, Tag-Out IS Vitally Important”

Caution: Somewhat Graphic Photo – Note: These Photos are the property of Jack Benton, and may not be used without written consent.

labour_accident_02

labour_accident_01

Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)


Introduction

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities.

Approximately 3 million workers service equipment and face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented. Compliance with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation. In a study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities (83 of 414) that occurred among their members between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically, lockout/tagout procedures.

LOTO is addressed in specific standards for the general industry, marine terminals, longshoring, and the construction industry.

Standards

This section highlights OSHA standards, preambles to final rules (background to final rules), directives (instructions for compliance officers), standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to LOTO.

Note: Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

OSHA

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)

Marine Terminals (29 CFR 1917)

Longshoring (29 CFR 1918)

Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)

Preambles to Final Rules

Directives

Standard Interpretations

National Consensus

Note: These are NOT OSHA regulations. However, they do provide guidance from their originating organizations related to worker protection.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

Lockout/Tagout Concepts

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities. This requires that a designated individual turns off and disconnects the machinery or equipment from its energy source(s) before performing service or maintenance and that the authorized employee(s) either lock or tag the energy-isolating device(s) to prevent the release of hazardous energy and take steps to verify that the energy has been isolated effectively. The following references provide information about the LOTO process.

  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD) Research Publications-11. Also available as a 49 KB PDF, 2 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout [212 KB PDF*, 2 pages]. OSHA Fact Sheet, (2002). A Spanish version [49 KB PDF*, 1 page] is also available.
  • Preventing Worker Deaths from Uncontrolled Release of Electrical, Mechanical, and Other Types of Hazardous Energy. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-110, (1999, August).
  • Guidelines for Controlling Hazardous Energy During Maintenance and Servicing [Lockout/Tagout]. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 83-125, (1983, September).

Lockout/Tagout Program

Example elements of a lockout/tagout (LOTO) program are described in the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.147, along with these additional references.

Additional Information

Related Safety and Health Topics Pages

Training

  • Small Business Handbook. OSHA Publication 2209-02R, (2005). Also available as a 260 KB PDF, 56 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD). Provides an index to several training videos available through NASD.
  • Rollstock and Sheet Extrusion Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an extrusion molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Injection Molding Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an injection molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Roll-fed and Inline Thermoforming Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating roll-fed and inline thermoforming machines.

 

 

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Control of Hazardous Energy: “Why Lock-Out, Tag-Out IS Vitally Important”

Caution: Somewhat Graphic Photo – Note: These Photos are the property of Jack Benton, and may not be used without written consent.

labour_accident_02

labour_accident_01

Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)


Introduction

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities.

Approximately 3 million workers service equipment and face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented. Compliance with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation. In a study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities (83 of 414) that occurred among their members between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically, lockout/tagout procedures.

LOTO is addressed in specific standards for the general industry, marine terminals, longshoring, and the construction industry.

Standards

This section highlights OSHA standards, preambles to final rules (background to final rules), directives (instructions for compliance officers), standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to LOTO.

Note: Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

OSHA

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)

Marine Terminals (29 CFR 1917)

Longshoring (29 CFR 1918)

Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)

Preambles to Final Rules

Directives

Standard Interpretations

National Consensus

Note: These are NOT OSHA regulations. However, they do provide guidance from their originating organizations related to worker protection.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

Lockout/Tagout Concepts

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities. This requires that a designated individual turns off and disconnects the machinery or equipment from its energy source(s) before performing service or maintenance and that the authorized employee(s) either lock or tag the energy-isolating device(s) to prevent the release of hazardous energy and take steps to verify that the energy has been isolated effectively. The following references provide information about the LOTO process.

  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD) Research Publications-11. Also available as a 49 KB PDF, 2 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout [212 KB PDF*, 2 pages]. OSHA Fact Sheet, (2002). A Spanish version [49 KB PDF*, 1 page] is also available.
  • Preventing Worker Deaths from Uncontrolled Release of Electrical, Mechanical, and Other Types of Hazardous Energy. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-110, (1999, August).
  • Guidelines for Controlling Hazardous Energy During Maintenance and Servicing [Lockout/Tagout]. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 83-125, (1983, September).

Lockout/Tagout Program

Example elements of a lockout/tagout (LOTO) program are described in the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.147, along with these additional references.

Additional Information

Related Safety and Health Topics Pages

Training

  • Small Business Handbook. OSHA Publication 2209-02R, (2005). Also available as a 260 KB PDF, 56 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD). Provides an index to several training videos available through NASD.
  • Rollstock and Sheet Extrusion Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an extrusion molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Injection Molding Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an injection molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Roll-fed and Inline Thermoforming Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating roll-fed and inline thermoforming machines.

 

 

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Many Oil & Gas Workers Not Aware Of New Hydrogen Sulfide “STEL”

poisonous-gas-hydrogen-sulfide

More than half of the oil and gas industry safety professionals who took a recent survey conducted by Dräger and the American Society of Safety Engineers indicated they were not aware of new hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure limits recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. The gas detection manufacturer released the results of “The 1ppm (parts per million) Hydrogen Sulfide Threshold: Are you prepared?” survey this week.

Dräger reported that 53 percent of the safety professionals surveyed were unaware of the new standards, which are:

Threshold Limit Value (TLV): 1 ppm
Time Weighted Average (TWA): 1.4 mg/m3
Short Term Exposure Level (STEL): 5 ppm, 7.0mg/m3

In addition, the survey showed that 76 percent of these professionals felt there is no urgency to adopt the new standards, and their companies use a variety of alarm levels: 39 percent use 10 ppm and 15 ppm; 35 percent use 5 ppm and 10 ppm; and 15 percent use 10 ppm and 20 ppm. “Of those companies that have not adopted the new ACGIH guidance, only 24 percent have adjusted their H2S limits within the last three years. Moreover, only 34 percent anticipate adjusting their current H2S limits in the near future,” according to the company’s news release.

The new ACGIH standards are voluntary, not mandatory, but are widely accepted.

For a copy of the study or the white paper, email: Robert.Zurek@draeger.com

Safety Photos of the Day – “Why Lock-Out, Tag-Out IS Vitally Important” – Part II

Caution: Somewhat Graphic Photos – Not for the faint of heart.

LOTO 2 October 2013 LOTO 2A October 2013

A cotton factory worker fell unconscious while standing up after his head became clamped in a machine. The incident happened in Wenzhou, eastern China’s Zhejiang Province. After the worker became trapped emergency services were called to help free him. When firefighters arrived at the factory they found the worker had lost consciousness, but he was held upright because his head was clamped by a machine. Lack of  using LOTO, Trip Sensors & Guarding were deemed to be the cause of the accident.

 

Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)


Introduction

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities.

Approximately 3 million workers service equipment and face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented. Compliance with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation. In a study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities (83 of 414) that occurred among their members between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically, lockout/tagout procedures.

LOTO is addressed in specific standards for the general industry, marine terminals, longshoring, and the construction industry.

Standards

This section highlights OSHA standards, preambles to final rules (background to final rules), directives (instructions for compliance officers), standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to LOTO.

Note: Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

OSHA

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)

Marine Terminals (29 CFR 1917)

Longshoring (29 CFR 1918)

Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)

Preambles to Final Rules

Directives

Standard Interpretations

National Consensus

Note: These are NOT OSHA regulations. However, they do provide guidance from their originating organizations related to worker protection.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

Lockout/Tagout Concepts

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities. This requires that a designated individual turns off and disconnects the machinery or equipment from its energy source(s) before performing service or maintenance and that the authorized employee(s) either lock or tag the energy-isolating device(s) to prevent the release of hazardous energy and take steps to verify that the energy has been isolated effectively. The following references provide information about the LOTO process.

  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD) Research Publications-11. Also available as a 49 KB PDF, 2 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout [212 KB PDF*, 2 pages]. OSHA Fact Sheet, (2002). A Spanish version [49 KB PDF*, 1 page] is also available.
  • Preventing Worker Deaths from Uncontrolled Release of Electrical, Mechanical, and Other Types of Hazardous Energy. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-110, (1999, August).
  • Guidelines for Controlling Hazardous Energy During Maintenance and Servicing [Lockout/Tagout]. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 83-125, (1983, September).

Lockout/Tagout Program

Example elements of a lockout/tagout (LOTO) program are described in the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.147, along with these additional references.

Additional Information

Related Safety and Health Topics Pages

Training

  • Small Business Handbook. OSHA Publication 2209-02R, (2005). Also available as a 260 KB PDF, 56 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD). Provides an index to several training videos available through NASD.
  • Rollstock and Sheet Extrusion Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an extrusion molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Injection Molding Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an injection molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Roll-fed and Inline Thermoforming Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating roll-fed and inline thermoforming machines.

Safety Photos of the Year: “Why Lock-Out, Tag-Out IS Vitally Important”

Caution: Somewhat Graphic Photo – Note: These Photos are the property of Jack Benton, and may not be used without written consent!

labour_accident_02

labour_accident_01

Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)


Introduction

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities.

Approximately 3 million workers service equipment and face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented. Compliance with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation. In a study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities (83 of 414) that occurred among their members between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically, lockout/tagout procedures.

LOTO is addressed in specific standards for the general industry, marine terminals, longshoring, and the construction industry.

Standards

This section highlights OSHA standards, preambles to final rules (background to final rules), directives (instructions for compliance officers), standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to LOTO.

Note: Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

OSHA

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)

Marine Terminals (29 CFR 1917)

Longshoring (29 CFR 1918)

Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)

Preambles to Final Rules

Directives

Standard Interpretations

National Consensus

Note: These are NOT OSHA regulations. However, they do provide guidance from their originating organizations related to worker protection.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

Lockout/Tagout Concepts

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities. This requires that a designated individual turns off and disconnects the machinery or equipment from its energy source(s) before performing service or maintenance and that the authorized employee(s) either lock or tag the energy-isolating device(s) to prevent the release of hazardous energy and take steps to verify that the energy has been isolated effectively. The following references provide information about the LOTO process.

  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD) Research Publications-11. Also available as a 49 KB PDF, 2 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout [212 KB PDF*, 2 pages]. OSHA Fact Sheet, (2002). A Spanish version [49 KB PDF*, 1 page] is also available.
  • Preventing Worker Deaths from Uncontrolled Release of Electrical, Mechanical, and Other Types of Hazardous Energy. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-110, (1999, August).
  • Guidelines for Controlling Hazardous Energy During Maintenance and Servicing [Lockout/Tagout]. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 83-125, (1983, September).

Lockout/Tagout Program

Example elements of a lockout/tagout (LOTO) program are described in the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.147, along with these additional references.

Additional Information

Related Safety and Health Topics Pages

Training

  • Small Business Handbook. OSHA Publication 2209-02R, (2005). Also available as a 260 KB PDF, 56 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD). Provides an index to several training videos available through NASD.
  • Rollstock and Sheet Extrusion Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an extrusion molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Injection Molding Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an injection molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Roll-fed and Inline Thermoforming Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating roll-fed and inline thermoforming machines.

 

OSHA Safeguards For Electrical Personal Protection – Arc Flash

This is probably the second most-viewed arc flash video online. It shows three workers working in the open door of an exterior electrical substation when an arc flash occurs. They all sustained burns—one was very serious. Read more about this story here.

This video shows the supervised re-energizing of a switchgear box that led to an arc blast. No one was injured in this video, but it does illustrate the explosive force of such an event. Unlike the first two videos, this video has audio and is shot from a close distance; this gives a more visceral sense of the blast’s raw power.

Arc Flash Hazard Risk Clothing Minimum Requirements

Jazard Risk Chart - Arc Flash Protective Clothing


Part Number: 1910
• Part Title: Occupational Safety and Health Standards
• Subpart: S
• Subpart Title: Electrical
• Standard Number: 1910.335
• Title: Safeguards for personnel protection.

1910.335(a)

Use of protective equipment.

1910.335(a)(1)

Personal protective equipment.

1910.335(a)(1)(i)

Employees working in areas where there are potential electrical hazards shall be provided with, and shall use, electrical protective equipment that is appropriate for the specific parts of the body to be protected and for the work to be performed.

Note: Personal protective equipment requirements are contained in subpart I of this part.

1910.335(a)(1)(ii)

Protective equipment shall be maintained in a safe, reliable condition and shall be periodically inspected or tested, as required by 1910.137.

1910.335(a)(1)(iii)

If the insulating capability of protective equipment may be subject to damage during use, the insulating material shall be protected. (For example, an outer covering of leather is sometimes used for the protection of rubber insulating material.)

1910.335(a)(1)(iv)

Employees shall wear nonconductive head protection wherever there is a danger of head injury from electric shock or burns due to contact with exposed energized parts.

1910.335(a)(1)(v)

Employees shall wear protective equipment for the eyes or face wherever there is danger of injury to the eyes or face from electric arcs or flashes or from flying objects resulting from electrical explosion.

1910.335(a)(2)

General protective equipment and tools.

1910.335(a)(2)(i)

When working near exposed energized conductors or circuit parts, each employee shall use insulated tools or handling equipment if the tools or handling equipment might make contact with such conductors or parts. If the insulating capability of insulated tools or handling equipment is subject to damage, the insulating material shall be protected.

1910.335(a)(2)(i)(A)

Fuse handling equipment, insulated for the circuit voltage, shall be used to remove or install fuses when the fuse terminals are energized.

1910.335(a)(2)(i)(B)

Ropes and handlines used near exposed energized parts shall be nonconductive.

1910.335(a)(2)(ii)

Protective shields, protective barriers, or insulating materials shall be used to protect each employee from shock, burns, or other electrically related injuries while that employee is working near exposed energized parts which might be accidentally contacted or where dangerous electric heating or arcing might occur. When normally enclosed live parts are exposed for maintenance or repair, they shall be guarded to protect unqualified persons from contact with the live parts.

1910.335(b)

Alerting techniques. The following alerting techniques shall be used to warn and protect employees from hazards which could cause injury due to electric shock, burns, or failure of electric equipment parts:

1910.335(b)(1)

Safety signs and tags. Safety signs, safety symbols, or accident prevention tags shall be used where necessary to warn employees about electrical hazards which may endanger them, as required by 1910.145.

1910.335(b)(2)

Barricades. Barricades shall be used in conjunction with safety signs where it is necessary to prevent or limit employee access to work areas exposing employees to uninsulated energized conductors or circuit parts. Conductive barricades may not be used where they might cause an electrical contact hazard.

1910.335(b)(3)

Attendants. If signs and barricades do not provide sufficient warning and protection from electrical hazards, an attendant shall be stationed to warn and protect employees.

 

Preventing Falls In The Solar Industry

California FACE Program Action Page – Preventing Falls in the Solar Industry

The California Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) program investigates work-related fatalities to identify the causes and prevent similar incidents from occurring in the future.

This video explains how Hans Petersen, a 30-year-old solar panel installer, was killed when he fell off an apartment building roof… and what can be done to prevent this from happening again.

Digital stories are best used as educational triggers that can kick off a worker training session and facilitate discussion. See below for video discussion questions, fact sheets, the corresponding FACE investigation report, and video download instructions.

Additional Educational Materials

Solar Digital Story Discussion Questions

  • What caused Hans to fall off the roof?
  • Have you or someone you know ever faced a similar fall hazard? Please tell us about it.
  • What are all of the different fall protection systems that could have been used at Hans’ jobsite?
  • What needs to be done to identify potential fall hazards prior to starting a job?

Solar Fact Sheet (PDF)Opens in new browser windowSpanish

Solar Fatality Investigation Report (PDF) Opens in new browser window

To obtain copies of the videos

Download from Vimeo (links below), or order by calling 510-620-5772 or e-mail FACE@cdph.ca.gov.

Source: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/ohb-face/Pages/SolarAction.aspx

 

Tunnel Vision: CSB Incorrectly Labeling All Hoeganaes Incidents As Combustible Dust Flash Fires

Photo Credit: U.S. Chemical Safety Board -“Large hole (approximately 3 x 7 inches) in a corroded section of piping that carried hydrogen and ran through the trench.”

Incorrect labeling the third Hoeganaes incident on MAY 27, 2011 as a combustible dust flash fire resulting in three fatalities. “…not just one, not just two, but three — three! — combustible dust flash fires.” They killed a total of five workers and injured three others.In contrast, according to the CSB Hoeganaes Case Study, the third incident was a hydrogen vapor cloud explosion (VCE) where hydrogen was ignited following a leakage from a corroded section of piping conveying hydrogen. http://www.csb.gov/assets/document/CSB_Case_Study_Hoeganaes_Feb3_300-1.pdf (page 6 .pdf)

There were no reported thermal burns of employees from combustible dust flash fires in this incident. “Two mechanics near the forklift were transported to a local hospital where they were treated for smoke inhalation and released shortly thereafter.”

“Witnesses saw burning dust raining down from above. However, the witness statements as well as the physical evidence leave no doubt that combustible iron dust was also involved in the aftermath of the explosion. Examining the scene following the incident, CSB investigators observed splattering of burned iron dust.” http://www.csb.gov/assets/news/document/Final_Statement_6_3_2011.pdf (page 2-3 .pdf)

Since when does burning dust raining down from above resulting in splattering of burned iron dust on the deck constitute a combustible dust flash fire? A ComDust flash fire requires a minimum explosive concentration (MEC). Burning dust raining down is not a flash fire.

Tunnel vision ignoring other explosive atmospheres in conjunction with accident investigations determining root and contributing cause regarding mechanical integrity in close proximity to combustible dust is not the solution in comprehensively addressing best practices from lessons-learned.

“Powdered metals plant in Gallatin Tennessee had not just one, not just two, but three — three! — combustible dust flash fires. They killed a total of five workers and injured three others.”

The “company’s lack of adherence to rigorous dust control standards was the primary cause of the incidents due to large dust accumulations throughout the facility. ” http://www.csb.gov/assets/news/document/ICC_Speech_10_22_2012.pdf (page 3 .pdf)

So lack of adherence to rigorous dust control standards was the primary cause of the corroded hydrogen piping resulting in the catastrophic hydrogen vapor cloud explosion (VCE) with three fatalities? What about adherence to best industry practices referencing ASME B31.12 Hydrogen Piping and Pipelines, NFPA 55 Compressed Gases and Cryogenic Fluids, CGA G-5.4 Standard for Hydrogen Piping Systems at User Locations and NFPA 2 Hydrogen Technologies Code in preventing future catastrophic hydrogen vapor cloud explosions?

Excellent resource from the EUROPEAN INDUSTRIAL GASES ASSOCIATION. “Scope of this document is for metallic transmission and distribution piping systems carrying pure hydrogen and hydrogen mixtures.” Must read section on corrosion protection for underground pipelines. Did the Hoeganaes hydrogen pipeline have sufficient corrosion protection? http://h2bestpractices.org/docs/Doc121_04%20H2TransportationPipelines.pdf

Solely referring to the primary cause of the hydrogen vapor cloud explosion as large dust accumulations throughout the facility could possibly overlook more pertinent root and contributing causes such as insufficient corrosion protection. Are global stakeholders aware their underground hydrogen piping is at potential risk?

Post Contributor: John Astad – The Combustible Dust Policy Institute – Combustible Dust Blog: http://dustexplosions.blogspot.com/

 

Underground Storage Tank Operator Training Rule Deadline of August 8, 2012 Is Fast Approaching

Video Courtesy of BLR®

The US EPA Established 3 Classes of Training Operators – A, B & C

Class A Operator

A Class A operator has primary responsibility to operate and maintain the UST system. These responsibilities include managing resources and personnel, such as establishing work assignments, to achieve and maintain compliance with regulatory requirements.

In general, this individual focuses on the broader aspects of the statutory and regulatory requirements and standards necessary to operate and maintain the UST system. For example, this individual typically ensures that appropriate individual(s):

  • Properly operate and maintain the underground storage tank system.
  • Maintain appropriate records.
  • Are trained to operate and maintain the underground storage tank system and keep records.
  • Properly respond to emergencies caused by releases or spills from underground storage tank systems at the facility.
  • Make financial responsibility documents available to the underground storage tank implementing agency as required.

Class B Operator

A Class B operator implements applicable underground storage tank regulatory requirements and standards in the field. This individual implements day-to-day aspects of operating, maintaining, and recordkeeping for underground storage tanks at one or more facilities.

For example, this individual typically monitors, maintains, and ensures:

  • Release detection method, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements are met.
  • Release prevention equipment, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements are met.
  • All relevant equipment complies with performance standards.
  • Appropriate individuals are trained to properly respond to emergencies caused by releases or spills from underground storage tank systems at the facility.

Class C Operator

A Class C operator is an employee and is, generally, the first line of response to events indicating emergency conditions. This individual is responsible for responding to alarms or other indications of emergencies caused by spills or releases from underground storage tank systems. This individual notifies the Class B or Class A operator and appropriate emergency responders when necessary. Not all employees of the facility are necessarily Class C operators. This individual typically:

  • Controls or monitors the dispensing or sale of regulated substances, or
  • Is responsible for initial response to alarms or releases.

Operator Training

Background And Requirements

Title XV, Section B of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 amends Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, the original legislation that created the underground storage tank (UST) program. The UST provisions of the Energy Policy Act focus on preventing releases and direct EPA to help states comply with new UST requirements.

Section 1524 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 states that EPA, in coordination with states, must develop training guidelines for three distinct classes of operators who operate and maintain federally regulated underground storage tank systems.

States receiving funding under Subtitle I shall develop state-specific training requirements consistent with EPA’s guidelines. The state-specific training requirements must:

· Be developed in cooperation with tank owners and operators;

· Take into consideration training programs implemented by owners and operators; and

· Be appropriately communicated to tank owners and operators.

Grant Guidelines

On August 8, 2007, EPA published final grant guidelines for operator training in the Federal Register. You can view the grant guidelines in PDF (PDF) (14 pp, 119K, About PDF) or view the grant guidelines in HTML.

Deadlines

August 8, 2009 – States receiving funding under Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act must develop state-specific training requirements consistent with EPA’s guidelines.

August 8, 2012 – States ensure all three classes of operators are trained according to state-specific training requirements.

State Status

This map (PDF) (1 pg, 91K, About PDF) shows states’ status toward meeting EPA’s operator training grant guidelines. States with posted requirements do not necessarily meet all requirements of the operator training grant guidelines.

For More Information

The Association of State and Territorial Solid Waste Management Officials (ASTSWMO) UST Task Force developed the Operator Training Resource Guide (PDF) (83 pp, 1.9MB, About PDF) which provides information on how states are implementing their operator training program. ASTSWMO also developed a spreadsheet (PDF) (12 pp, 430K, About PDF) outlining key decisions states made in implementing their program.

Contact Tim Smith of EPA’s Office of Underground Storage Tanks at smith.timr or (703) 603-7158.

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