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“House Fires Caused By Storage of 9 Volt, AA Batteries In Junk Drawers & Other Places Rising”

* If You Know of a Fire Incident in Your Town Caused by 9 Volt, AA or AAA Battery Storage in a Home, Please Note it in the comments Section of this Post! Thank You!

Click here for the recent Hastings, Nebraska House Fire on January 16, 2017

If you are storing loose 9 volt or AA or other batteries in a kitchen drawer or a “junk” drawer in your home, watch how you store them. Above all don’t store them loose and rolling around with other metal items, like small tools, paper clips, nails and more of the lovely mix of things we keep in our junk drawers. You also don’t want them loose and rolling around in other items like a camera case, luggage, etc.

All you need to have happened is for a metal object like steel wool or a paper clip short out across the top of a 9-volt battery and ignite paper or other easily ignited materials and you’ll have a potential disaster in your home. As indicated in the YouTube Video below, it doesn’t take much to heat a metallic object or cause a spark in order to start a fire. *Please Do Not Do This At Home*

What to do with a 9 Volt Battery

I teach safety to the public, common sense tells most of us what to do in situations that could become life threatening. I speak to 50-60 people at a time about fire safety in the home on a monthly basis. I get the same reaction from every group when I hold up a 9-volt battery and announce that it is a fire hazard and it could burn down your house.

They all kinda look at me funny, as if to ask, “Did you just say a 9-volt battery could burn down my house?” That look is almost comical.

Q: Where do you store your batteries?

A: Throw them in  in a “junk” drawer

I then hold up a brillo pad. (just one example)

Q: What do you do with the batteries when you are done with them?

A: Throw them in the trash.

A 9-volt battery (see video) is a fire hazard because the positive and negative posts are on top, right next to one another. If this comes in contact with anything metal (aluminum foil, brillo, etc…) it will spark, and if there is a fuel for this spark you will have a fire. (fire needs heat, fuel and oxygen to burn) To test this theory, put a 9-volt battery or a couple of AA batteries in your pocket with some loose change or your key chain full of keys, (use common sense) this will bring on a whole new meaning to the words, Hot Pants.

When you dispose of this type of battery (positive and negative on top) Make sure it is safely wrapped in electrical tape or something to keep it separated from anything else that may come in contact with it. A small box or zip lock bag if kept in a junk drawer should suffice.  I have seen in some stores now that the manufacturers are now packaging them with plastic caps. If you need to purchase a 9-volt battery try to find those that are packaged in this manner.

Try to be just as diligent with AA or AAA batteries. Keep them in their original packaging if stored in a “junk drawer”. Don’t let them roll around freely with all the other wonderful miscellaneous items we unknowingly toss in the drawer and don’t think twice about it.

 

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Is Your Evacuation Plan Working? – If Not, Here’s The OSHA Requirements.

What’s wrong with this video? Are we this complacent? Is Everyone a reporter? – What Would YOU Do? (Note: Raw News Footage. The first minute should show you all you need to know!)

Evacuation Plans and Procedures eTool - What is an Emergency Action Plan- 2014-01-21 14-40-32

OSHA Evacuation Plans & Procedures E-Tool: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/evacuation/

OSHA Requirements:

Fight or Flee? | Extinguisher Basics | Fire Extinguisher Use | Extinguisher Placement and Spacing
Hydrostatic Testing |Test Your Knowledge

The requirements of this section apply to the placement, use, maintenance, and testing of portable fire extinguishers provided for the use of employees. The selection and distribution section does not apply to extinguishers provided for employee use on the outside of workplace buildings or structures.

Where extinguishers are provided but are not intended for employee use and the employer has an emergency action plan and a fire prevention plan that meet the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.38, then only the requirements of the inspection, maintenance and testing and hydrostatic testing sections apply [29 CFR 1910.157(a)]. To comply with OSHA requirements, consider the following:

 

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How NOT to Repair Your Car! How Many Things Can You See Wrong Here?

20121127-204959.jpg

 

Doing your own auto repair work can save you money, but it can also be dirty, dangerous work.

The following tips are provided to help you avoid the dangers of auto repair so you don’t injure yourself or someone else. Most of these tips are common sense warnings, but there may be some things you are not aware of that could pose a potential danger.

First and foremost, DO NOT attempt repairs that are beyond your ability. If you feel unsure about a repair, you should seek out a competent professional to do the work for you. Better to pay someone who knows what they are doing than to attempt to fix it yourself and screw it up. Many systems on vehicles today are very complex. Repairs often require considerable skill and expertise, not to mention special tools and equipment. A simple mistake could ruin sensitive (and expensive!) electronic components. So don’t tackle jobs that are beyond your abilities.

Know your physical limits. Do NOT attempt repairs yourself if you are not physically able to do the work. Replacing certain components may require heavy lifting (changing or removing tires, pulling a cylinder head, etc.), crawling under the vehicle, laying or working in an awkward position, reaching, bending, twisting, pulling, tugging, straining, jerking and motions you may not be accustomed to making. Use common sense. If you have a bad back, joint problems or lack the physical strength to do something, then DIY auto repair is not for you. Hire someone to do it for you.

Be focused. DO NOT attempt to undertake any maintenance or repair work on your vehicle if you are tired, not feeling well, tipsy, intoxicated, on medication or otherwise impaired. Exhaustion, illness, alcoholic beverages and even some medications may affect your judgment and perception creating a potential for injury or error. Save the beer for after the job has been completed.

GENERAL AUTO REPAIR PRECAUTIONS

  • Do NOT smoke when working on any fuel related components (fuel filter, carburetor, fuel injectors, fuel pump, fuel tank or fuel lines). Better yet, do NOT smoke at all. It is bad for your health!

car on fire

  • Have a fire extinguisher nearby just in case. The fire extinguisher should have a “B” (liquids & grease fires) and “C” (electrical fires) rating.

battery exploded

  • Do NOT smoke or get any sparks near the battery. Batteries contain hydrogen gas which is very explosive. If jump starting a battery, make the final jumper connection to the engine or chassis.


  • NEVER crawl under an improperly supported vehicle. In other words, never trust a jack alone to hold the vehicle up. Always use a pair of support stands positioned underneath the vehicle to keep it from falling on you. Make sure the weight ratings on the support stands is more than adequate to hold up the vehicle’s weight, too. Do not use blocks of wood, boxes, wheels or bricks for supports because these may slip or collapse and allow the vehicle to fall. For more information on how to safely lift and support your vehicle, Click Here.

car battery . fuses

  • Always disconnect one of the battery cables or remove power fuses for a circuit when doing electrical repair work (as when replacing a starter, installing a radio, fixing a broken switch or wiring, etc.). This will prevent accidental shorts that could damage the wiring or start a fire. This is also a very important precaution to heed when working under the dash of any vehicle equipped with an air bag. Crossing the wrong wires might set off the air bag (which could cause injury and is very expensive to replace).

air bag

  • Watch Out for the Air Bags!. If working on the steering column or under the instrument panel or dash, always disconnect the battery and wait at least 15 minutes before proceeding with any disassembly or wiring tests. Crossing, jumping or shorting wires in the air bag circuit could cause the air bag(s) to accidentally deploy and possibly injure you. Air Bag wiring is often color-coded YELLOW.


car wiring

  • Never disconnect or unplug any electrical connector while the engine is running or the key is in the “on” position (unless you are specifically instructed to do so as part of a diagnostic procedure in a shop manual). Unplugging connectors while current is flowing through them creates a voltage spike that can damage sensitive and expensive electronic components.

alternator belt

  • Do not wear loose clothing, jewelry, rings, neckties, scarves or bulky gloves when working on your vehicle. If you have long hair, tie it back or cover it. These items may become entangled in pulleys or moving parts causing serious injury, dismemberment or death!
  • Watch out for moving parts such as drive belts, pulleys, fan and other moving parts when working under the hood if the engine is running. DO NOT lean over a mechanical cooling fan while revving the engine.

  • Watch out for hot stuff. If the engine is running or the vehicle has been driven within the past half hour or so, the engine, radiator, exhaust manifolds, catalytic converter, muffler and pipes will be hot.

radiator cap

  • NEVER open the radiator cap on a hot engine. Always allow the engine to cool for at least an hour before attempting to open the cap. Even then, use extreme caution. Place a rag over the cap, then loosen it slowly to the first detent or stop. At this point any residual pressure and steam should be released. Wait until all pressure has escaped before removing the cap the rest of the way.


  • Avoid electrical shocks when working around the ignition system. The normal battery voltage in passenger car and light truck electrical systems is only 12 volts and will not harm you. But the ignition system bumps the primary voltage up to 25,000 to 40,000 volts which can give you a nasty shock if you touch a spark plug wire, the ignition coil or distributor cap while the engine is running. On hybrid vehicles, the hybrid battery may contain up to 300 or more volts, which can kill or injure you. Do not touch any ORANGE high voltage cables unless the hybrid battery has first been disconnected. Also, wear Class 0 rated rubber gloves that can withstand up to 1000 volts.

  • Wear eye protection when working under the vehicle (to keep dirt and debris from falling into your eyes), when pounding or grinding on anything (to keep metal chips out of your eyes), when jump starting the battery (to keep acid out of your eyes should the battery explode), when working on air conditioning components (to keep refrigerant out of your eyes), and/or when doing anything that might pose a risk to your sight.

  • Wear ear protection when using loud pneumatic tools or when hammering, pounding, grinding, sawing, drilling, etc. Prolonged exposure to high levels of noise can cause permanent hearing loss.

dust mask

  • Wear breathing protection (an OSHA-approved mask, not just a cheap fiber dust mask) when spray painting or using other chemicals that give off aromatic hydrocarbons. A dust mask is recommended when grinding, sanding or sand blasting. A dust mask will NOT provide any protection against paint or chemical fumes. DO NOT use an air hose to blow brake dust off brake components. Brake dust may contain asbestos or other fibers that can cause lung disease if inhaled. Use a liquid cleaner to remove brake dust. When using aerosol products that contain VOCs or solvents (spray paint, throttle cleaner, brake cleaner, etc.), use in a well-ventilated area, avoid breathing the fumes and wear proper breathing protection. The best place to use such products is outdoors, or in a large garage with the door open, or with a ventilation fan that exchanges the dirty inside air for fresh outside air.

  • Do not open any brake lines or replace any components in a vehicle equipped with an “integral” ABS system (one where the master cylinder is combined with the ABS modulator, pump and pressure accumulator) without first depressurizing the system. This can usually be done by depressing the brake pedal 24 to 40 times while the key is off.

  • Use caution when opening any fuel lines on a fuel injected vehicle. The pressure in some systems may be as high as 80 to 90 psi when the engine is running. So do not open any fuel line while the engine is running unless your fire insurance and life insurance are both paid up. Residual fuel pressure can remain in the lines for many hours after the engine has been shut off. To minimize fuel spray, wrap a rag around the hose or line before loosening it, or relieve pressure in the line using a procedure approved by the vehicle manufacturer (refer to a shop manual for details).

    WARNING: On diesel engines, the fuel pressure inside the fuel lines between the injection pump and fuel injectors is extremely high when the engine is running (500 to 5000 psi or higher depending on engine speed and type of injection system!). Never start a diesel engine with a fuel line or injector disconnected.

  • Minimize distractions while working on your vehicle. This includes small children, pets, friends, spouses, in-laws or others who may distract you from your work. This will go a long ways towards reducing the risk of injury and making a mistake.

  • Tell someone if you are going to be working on your vehicle outdoors or if you are going to be working underneath your vehicle. Hopefully, they will know how to dial 911 should the need arise.

  • Avoid shock hazards with extension cords & electrical tools. If you are working outdoors and using power tools, make sure the extension cord you are using is rated for outdoor use, that the extension cord and tools are properly grounded (a “ground fault interrupt” outlet is recommended), and that the cord has the proper amp rating for the tools you are using. DO NOT use an adapter plug to convert a three-prong grounded plug into a two prong plug.

Great Home Auto repair Source: http://www.aa1car.com/

Advances in Tire Fires & Extinguishment – New Extinguishing Agent

Someone sent me a note asking about the latest technology in fighting a tire fire. This appears to be a great resource!

FEM-12 SC®

NEW! FEM-12 SC® reviewed in two leading technical publications
Click here for more information.

The latest agent added to the product line of safety products by the TLI Group for the fire protection industry, changes the way fires can now be safely extinguished. Now high temperature fires can be extinguished in any type of weather. No longer does the fire fighter have to stand within five to eight feet of a high temperature fire in order to extinguish it. The FEM-12 SC® extinguisher allows the fire fighter a range of 30 to 40 feet from the source of the fire. The FEM-12 SC® also presents an agent that is an environmentally safe alternative for the industry. In addition, the fire fighter no longer has to worry about breathing clouds of dust. FEM-12 SC® can now extinguish those high temperature vertical fires safely, and quickly. There is little threat of the material reigniting. Also, the fire fighter no longer has to stand over the fire for over 30 minutes to see if it is going to reignite after applying a dry powder agent. The fire fighter can now move on without worry and extinguish other areas of concern.

Applications include metal fires, such as magnesium and titanium used in aircraft brake assemblies and landing gear components. Other applications include rubber tires, aircraft engines, magnesium rims; and other structural components of the aircraft such as fiber glass, composite materials, and composite materials with honeycomb aluminum.

The extinguishing elements of the FEM-12 SC® work to reduce high temperature fires rapidly, and quickly. It coats the burning material to help in preventing reignition. Because it is a liquid vertical fires can now be successfully fought where previously dry powder was ineffective.

This material has passed the U.S Federal Aviation Administrations testing requirements for aquatic toxicity (American Society for Testing and Materials International – ASTM #E 729-96 reapproved 2002, with range finding test according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; and American National Standards Institute – ANSI/UL 711 Rating and Testing of Fire Extinguishing Section 10.2 and 10.2.28.) These tests where conducted by the United States Air Force Research Laboratory for the U.S. FAA.

For further information go to www.tligroup.com or Google “tn06/26” to see a white paper jointly issued by the United States FAA and the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory.

Basic EPA Tire Fire Information

Photo of Burning Tires

Tire fires, although infrequent, are serious situations that are difficult to extinguish and expensive to clean-up.

Tire fires often become major hazardous incidents affecting entire communities—frequently requiring neighborhood evacuations and long, drawn-out fire extinguishing operations. These fires threaten pollution of the air, soil, and water. EPA, states, municipalities, and private companies have spent millions of dollars cleaning up tire fires across the country.

EPA does not consider scrap tires a hazardous waste. However, if a tire fire occurs, tires break down into hazardous compounds including gases, heavy metals, and oil. The average passenger car tire is estimated to produce over two gallons of oil when burned. (Source: Rubber Manufacturers Association, April 2003)

Oil that exudes into ground and surface water as a result of tire fires is a significant environment pollutant. In some cases, this may trigger Superfund cleanup status. For every million tires consumed by fire, about 55,000 gallons of runoff oil can pollute the environment unless contained and collected. This oily material is also highly flammable.

Air pollution is also produced by tire fires. Air emissions may include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene, styrene, phenols, and butadiene. For more information on toxic air pollutants generated by tire fires, go to EPA’s Toxics Air Pollution website.

Notable Tire Fires

  • In 1983, a 7-million tire fire in Rhinehart, Virginia issued a plum of smoke 3,000 feet high and nearly 50 miles long with air pollution emissions deposited in three states. The fire burned for nine months, polluting nearby water sources with lead and arsenic. The tire storage facility where the fire occurred is now being cleaned-up as a Superfund site.
  • In 1999, a lightning strike ignited a tire fire in Westley, California. The tire dump contained millions of scrap tires located in a canyon in a coastal mountain range. The large smoke plume from the fire impacted nearby farming communities and caused widespread concern of potential health affects from exposure to the smoke emissions. The tire fire also produced large volumes of pyrolitic oil that flowed off the slope and into the drainage of an intermittent stream. This oil was ignited too and the oil fire significantly increased the smoke emissions close to ground level. A response to the oil and tire fires was beyond the capabilities of local and state agencies. The EPA regional coordinator immediately responded using Oil Pollution Act of 1990 authority. It took 30 days to extinguish the fire. Total EPA response costs were $3.5 million.

Extinguishing Tire Fires

Waste tires are difficult to ignite, but once a tire fire starts, it is generally very hard to control and extinguish. Using water and/or foam to extinguish a tire fire is often futile. Water is best used to keep adjacent, unburned tires from igniting.

Smothering a tire fire with dirt or sand is usually the best option for extinguishing fires. Typically, the sand or dirt is moved with heavy equipment to cover the burning tires.

Putting out a tire fire can also be facilitated by removing unburned tires from the pile to lessen the fuel load.

Additional Information

Through EPA’s Superfund website, users can search for National Priority List sites throughout the US, including those that have resulted from tire fires—such as the Rhinehart Tire Fire Dump Site in Virginia.

Other resources include:

House Fires Caused By Storage of 9 Volt Batteries In Junk Drawers Rising

* If You Know of  a Fire Incident in Your Town Caused by 9 Volt, AA or AAA Battery Storage in a Home, Please Note it in the comments Section of this Post! Thank You!

If you are storing loose 9 volt or AA or other batteries in a kitchen drawer or a “junk” drawer in your home, watch how you store them. Above all don’t store them loose and rolling around with other metal, glues and more of the lovely mix of things we keep in our junk drawers.

All you need to have happen is for a metal object like steel wool or a paper clip short out across the top of a 9 volt battery and ignite paper or other easily ignited materials and you’ll have a potential disaster in your home. As indicated on the YouTube Video below, it doesn’t take much to heat a metallic object or cause a spark in order to start a fire. *Please Do Not Do This At Home*

What to do with a 9 Volt Battery

I teach  safety to the public, common sense tells most of us what to do in situations that could become life threatening. I speak to 50-60 people at a time about fire safety in the home on a monthly basis. I get the same reaction from every group when I hold up a 9 volt battery and announce that it is a fire hazard and it could burn down your house.

They all kinda look at me funny, as if to ask, “Did you just say a 9 volt battery could burn down my house?” That look is almost comical.

Q: Where do you store your batteries?

A: Throw them in  in a “junk” drawer

I then hold up a brillo pad. (just one example)

Q: What do you do with the batteries when you are done with them?

A: Throw them in the trash.

A 9 volt battery (see video) is a fire hazard because the positive and negative posts are on top, right next to one another. If this comes in contact with anything metal (aluminum foil, brillo, etc…) it will spark, and if there is a fuel for this spark you will have a fire. (fire needs heat, fuel and oxygen to burn) To test this theory, put a 9 volt battery or a couple of AA batteries in your pocket with some loose change or your key chain full of keys, (use common sense) this will bring on a whole new meaning to the words, Hot Pants.

When you dispose of this type of battery (positive and negative on top) Make sure it is safely wrapped in electrical tape or something to keep it separated from anything else that may come in contact with it. A small box or ziplock bag if kept in a junk drawer should suffice.  I have seen in some stores now that the manufacturers are now packaging them with plastic caps. If you need to purchase a 9 volt battery try to find those that are packaged in this manner.

Try to be just as diligent with AA or AAA batteries. Keep them in their original packaging if stored in a “junk drawer”. Don’t let them roll around freely with all the other wonderful miscellaneous items we unknowingly toss in the drawer and don’t think twice about it. Below are some additional tips in how to protect your kitchen from fire!

See An Updated Post on this Subject Here:https://ehssafetynews.wordpress.com/2012/11/05/updated-house-fires-caused-by-storage-of-9-volt-aa-batteries-on-the-rise/

How to Protect Your Kitchen from Fire

By Gilbert Nichols, eHow Member
Fire Station Personnel are vital to every citizen's well being!

Fire can strike at any moment. It can devastate whole families and destroy years of memories and possessions. Fire takes and gives nothing back.

Fire Prevention includes having a plan how to deal with it and how to stay safe. Kitchen fires are the most common of all house fires because of so many contributing factors. In this article, we will touch on what you need and must have in order to protect your kitchen from fire.

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Instructions

Things You’ll Need:

  • Common Sense
  • Fire Extinguisher
  • Smoke Detector – Photoelectric
  • Fire Detector – Clanging Bell
  • Fire Escape Plan
  • Cooperation by all in the house
  1. 1

    This household practices a fire drill every month!

    This household practices a fire drill every month!

    Fire safety in the kitchen is everybody’s responsibility, not just the main user of the kitchen. Therefore, in order to best protect your kitchen from fire, you must have an order how to do so. Smoke alarms are a must, if they are the right kind. Everybody can relate to the smoke alarm that goes off whenever you burn toast and you fan the smoke away from the detector so it will shut off. Eventually, you remove the batteries and sometimes forget to put them back in.

    The best detector for the kitchen is the bell detector. It sounds just like the school bell and is marketed in a fire resistant metal shell. It has a metal band wound by a key and will ring at 89 decibel or better for five minutes. See Resources for where to get them.

  2. 2

    A fire safety plan must be high priority and practiced monthly regardless of personal feelings. If we require schools to practice them often, why not families? Your plan should show where fire extinguishers are as well as multiple exits. For the kitchen, it would be good to know where to get out in the event a fire starts that is too big to handle.

  3. 3

    Dry chemical fire extinguishers work on most types of fires in the home.

    Dry chemical fire extinguishers work on most types of fires in the home.

    Fire extinguishers are only as good as the person handling them. Get to know which kind is best for your particular need. In the kitchen, an all-purpose or ABC fire extinguisher is best.

    A good rule of thumb with ABC extinguishers is to shake them twice or three times a year to loosen up the powder inside. The CO2 powder can clump over time and become useless. It should be placed in a cabinet or wall mounted in a central location in the kitchen for easy access.

  4. 4

    Keep out of reach of children and open flame.

    Keep out of reach of children and open flame.

    Remove combustibles away from open heat or flame. Paper plates, menus and cookbooks should not be near flames or hot surfaces. Also, keep flour and powdered coffee creamers away as they can EXPLODE if too close or dropped onto fire.

  5. 5

    Lids should make a proper seal to be effective.

    Lids should make a proper seal to be effective.

    Keep lids to pans close at hand to tightly fit over skillets in the event of a stove top fire. Although baking soda has been known to work, the best thing to do is cover the fire with a lid. Fire needs three ingredients: fuel, heat and oxygen. In the event of a fire, if you can remove any one of these three ingredients, you will eliminate your fire.

    It is important to note that if the fire is too much involved, get out of the house and call the fire department. Regardless whether you get all the fire out that you can see, if it had gotten into the ceiling where you cannot see it can smolder and erupt with a vengeance.

  6. 6

    Kitchen fires have occurred from faulty old coffee makers

    Kitchen fires have occurred from faulty old coffee makers

    Unplug unused counter top items, such as toasters, coffee makers and other electrical devices. At one time, old coffee makers were known to short out, causing scores of house fires nationwide.

    In addition to this, overloaded outlets are fires waiting to happen. Spread out your devices and consider stepping up your electrical circuits to handle more amperage.

  7. 7

    Check under your refrigerator for dust buildup and clean accordingly. Dust can ignite with a spark and cause a fire. Keep any loose papers and other items that can “fuel” a fire away. The same holds true for the fans over many stoves. The filter screen can draw in household dust and a floating spark could set it on fire.

  8. 8

    VITAL STEP! DO NOT MISS THIS! Your “junk” drawers are often found in the kitchen where spare batteries, cords and stuff is kept. Fires have often been linked to junk drawers in houses where exposed 9-volt batteries came into contact with steel wool. THIS IS NOT A JOKE!!!!

    Try this outside with supervision only: take a piece of steel wool and a nine volt battery. Hold the wool against both terminals of the battery at the same time and prepare to drop the wool onto a cement pavement. This can happen in your kitchen, in your junk drawer, with or without you being nearby. This can also happen in the trash can.

  9. 9

    1906 Fire Service in Old Sacramento, California

    1906 Fire Service in Old Sacramento, California

    Practice these steps and drill with everyone who stays overnight with you. Request your children and their friends to be conscious of this when away from home. Rehearse with your siblings, parents, grand parents and neighbors. Invite members of the local fire department to come out and hold a neighborhood fire training. Make it a block safety party and invite the media.

Read more: How to Protect Your Kitchen from Fire | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_4890067_protect-kitchen-fire.html#ixzz0xNo4XZf0

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