“Top 10 OSHA Citations of 2016: A Starting Point for Workplace Safety”

OSHAupdate

Every October, the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a preliminary list of the 10 most frequently cited safety and health violations for the 2016 fiscal year, compiled from nearly 32,000 inspections of workplaces by federal OSHA staff.

One remarkable thing about the list is that it rarely changes. Year after year, our inspectors see thousands of the same on-the-job hazards, any one of which could result in a fatality or severe injury.

More than 4,500 workers are killed on the job every year, and approximately 3 million are injured, despite the fact that by law, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their workers. If all employers simply corrected the top 10 hazards, we are confident the number of deaths, amputations and hospitalizations would drastically decline.

Consider this 2016 list a starting point for workplace safety:

  1. Fall protection
  2. Hazard communication
  3. Scaffolds
  4. Respiratory protection
  5. Lockout/tagout
  6. Powered industrial trucks
  7. Ladders
  8. Machine guarding
  9. Electrical wiring
  10. Electrical, general requirements

It’s no coincidence that falls are among the leading causes of worker deaths, particularly in construction, and our top 10 list features lack of fall protection as well as ladder and scaffold safety issues. We know how to protect workers from falls, and have an ongoing campaign to inform employers and workers about these measures. Employers must take these issues seriously.

We also see far too many workers killed or gruesomely injured when machinery starts up suddenly while being repaired, or hands and fingers are exposed to moving parts. Lockout/tagout and machine guarding violations are often the culprit here. Proper lockout/tagout procedures ensure that machines are powered off and can’t be turned on while someone is working on them. And installing guards to keep hands, feet and other appendages away from moving machinery prevents amputations and worse.

Respiratory protection is essential for preventing long term and sometimes fatal health problems associated with breathing in asbestos, silica or a host of other toxic substances. But we can see from our list of violations that not nearly enough employers are providing this needed protection and training.

The high number of fatalities associated with forklifts, and high number of violations for powered industrial trucksafety, tell us that many workers are not being properly trained to safely drive these kinds of potentially hazardous equipment.

Rounding out the top 10 list are violations related to electrical safety, an area where the dangers are well-known.

Our list of top violations is far from comprehensive. OSHA regulations cover a wide range of hazards, all of which imperil worker health and safety. And we urge employers to go beyond the minimal requirements to create a culture of safety at work, which has been shown to reduce costs, raise productivity and improve morale. To help them, we have released new recommendations for creating a safety and health program at their workplaces.

We have many additional resources, including a wealth of information on our website and our free and confidential On-site Consultation Program. But tackling the most common hazards is a good place to start saving workers’ lives and limbs.

Thomas Galassi is the director of enforcement programs for OSHA.

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“Top 10 OSHA Citations of 2016: A Starting Point for Workplace Safety”

OSHAupdate

Every October, the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a preliminary list of the 10 most frequently cited safety and health violations for the 2016 fiscal year, compiled from nearly 32,000 inspections of workplaces by federal OSHA staff.

One remarkable thing about the list is that it rarely changes. Year after year, our inspectors see thousands of the same on-the-job hazards, any one of which could result in a fatality or severe injury.

More than 4,500 workers are killed on the job every year, and approximately 3 million are injured, despite the fact that by law, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their workers. If all employers simply corrected the top 10 hazards, we are confident the number of deaths, amputations and hospitalizations would drastically decline.

Consider this 2016 list a starting point for workplace safety:

  1. Fall protection
  2. Hazard communication
  3. Scaffolds
  4. Respiratory protection
  5. Lockout/tagout
  6. Powered industrial trucks
  7. Ladders
  8. Machine guarding
  9. Electrical wiring
  10. Electrical, general requirements

It’s no coincidence that falls are among the leading causes of worker deaths, particularly in construction, and our top 10 list features lack of fall protection as well as ladder and scaffold safety issues. We know how to protect workers from falls, and have an ongoing campaign to inform employers and workers about these measures. Employers must take these issues seriously.

We also see far too many workers killed or gruesomely injured when machinery starts up suddenly while being repaired, or hands and fingers are exposed to moving parts. Lockout/tagout and machine guarding violations are often the culprit here. Proper lockout/tagout procedures ensure that machines are powered off and can’t be turned on while someone is working on them. And installing guards to keep hands, feet and other appendages away from moving machinery prevents amputations and worse.

Respiratory protection is essential for preventing long term and sometimes fatal health problems associated with breathing in asbestos, silica or a host of other toxic substances. But we can see from our list of violations that not nearly enough employers are providing this needed protection and training.

The high number of fatalities associated with forklifts, and high number of violations for powered industrial trucksafety, tell us that many workers are not being properly trained to safely drive these kinds of potentially hazardous equipment.

Rounding out the top 10 list are violations related to electrical safety, an area where the dangers are well-known.

Our list of top violations is far from comprehensive. OSHA regulations cover a wide range of hazards, all of which imperil worker health and safety. And we urge employers to go beyond the minimal requirements to create a culture of safety at work, which has been shown to reduce costs, raise productivity and improve morale. To help them, we have released new recommendations for creating a safety and health program at their workplaces.

We have many additional resources, including a wealth of information on our website and our free and confidential On-site Consultation Program. But tackling the most common hazards is a good place to start saving workers’ lives and limbs.

Thomas Galassi is the director of enforcement programs for OSHA.

First Phase of GHS Training Due Today (12/1/2013) – Are Your Employees Trained?

OSHA revised its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to align with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) and published it in the Federal Register in March 2012 (77 FR 17574). Two significant changes contained in the revised standard require the use of new labeling elements and a standardized format for Safety Data Sheets (SDSs), formerly known as, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs). The new label elements and SDS requirements will improve worker understanding of the hazards associated with the chemicals in their workplace. To help companies comply with the revised standard, OSHA is phasing in the specific requirements over several years (December 1, 2013 to June 1, 2016).

The first compliance date of the revised HCS is December 1, 2013. By that time employers must have trained their workers on the new label elements and the SDS format. This training is needed early in the transition process since workers are already beginning to see the new labels and SDSs on the chemicals in their workplace. To ensure employees have the information they need to better protect themselves from chemical hazards in the workplace during the transition period, it is critical that employees understand the new label and SDS formats.

The list below contains the minimum required topics for the training that must be completed by December 1, 2013.

Training on label elements must include information on:

• Type of information the employee would expect to see on the new labels, including the

Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can be (but is not limited to) the chemical name, code number or batch number. The manufacturer, importer or distributor can decide the appropriate product identifier. The same product identifier must be both on the label and in Section 1 of the SDS (Identification).

Signal word: used to indicate the relative level of severity of hazard and alert the reader to a potential hazard on the label. There are only two signal words, “Danger” and “Warning.” Within a specific hazard class, “Danger” is used for the more severe hazards and “Warning” is used for the less severe hazards. There will only be one signal word on the label no matter how many hazards a chemical may have. If one of the hazards warrants a “Danger” signal word and another warrants the signal word “Warning,” then only “Danger” should appear on the label.

Pictogram: OSHA’s required pictograms must be in the shape of a square set at a point and include a black hazard symbol on a white background with a red frame sufficiently wide enough to be clearly visible. A square red frame set at a point without a hazard symbol is not a pictogram and is not permitted on the label. OSHA has designated eight pictograms under this standard for application to a hazard category.

Hazard statement(s): describe the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including, where appropriate, the degree of hazard. For example: “Causes damage to kidneys through prolonged or repeated exposure when absorbed through the skin.” All of the applicable hazard statements must appear on the label. Hazard statements may be combined where appropriate to reduce redundancies and improve readability. The hazard statements are specific to the hazard classification categories, and chemical users should always see the same statement for the same hazards, no matter what the chemical is or who produces it.

Precautionary statement(s): means a phrase that describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical or improper storage or handling.

Name, address and phone number of the chemical manufacturer, distributor, or importer

• How an employee might use the labels in the workplace. For example,

✓ Explain how information on the label can be used to ensure proper storage of hazardous chemicals.

✓ Explain how the information on the label might be used to quickly locate information on first aid when needed by employees or emergency personnel.

• General understanding of how the elements work together on a label. For example,

✓ Explain that where a chemical has multiple hazards, different pictograms are used to identify the various hazards. The employee should expect to see the appropriate pictogram for the corresponding hazard class. ✓ Explain that when there are similar precautionary statements, the one providing the most protective information will be included on the label.

Training on the format of the SDS must include information on:

• Standardized 16-section format, including the type of information found in the various sections

✓ For example, the employee should be instructed that with the new format, Section 8 (Exposure Controls/Personal Protection) will always contain information about exposure limits, engineering controls and ways to protect yourself, including personal protective equipment.

• How the information on the label is related to the SDS✓ For example, explain that the precautionary statements would be the same on the label and on the SDS.

As referenced in Dr. Michaels’ OSHA Training Standards Policy Statement (April 28, 2010) – with all training, OSHA requires employers to present information in a manner and language that their employees can understand. If employers customarily need to communicate work instructions or other workplace information to employees in a language other than English, they will also need to provide safety and health training to employees in the same manner. Similarly, if the employee’s vocabulary is limited, the training must account for that limitation. By the same token, if employees are not literate, telling them to read training materials will not satisfy the employer’s training obligation.

OSHA’s Hazard Communication website (http://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/index.html) has the following QuickCards and OSHA Briefs to assist employers with the required training.

• Label QuickCard (English/Spanish)

• Pictogram QuickCard (English/Spanish)

• Safety Data Sheet QuickCard (English) (Spanish)

• Safety Data Sheet OSHA Brief

• Label/Pictogram OSHA Brief (to come)

This is one in a series of informational fact sheets highlighting OSHA programs, policies or standards. It does not impose any new compliance requirements. For a comprehensive list of compliance requirements of OSHA standards or regulations, refer to Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This information will be made available to sensory-impaired individuals upon request. The voice phone is (202) 693-1999; teletypewriter (TTY) number: (877) 889-5627.

DSG FS-3642 02/2013

 

Updated – December 1st, 2013 Training Video for the Revised Hazard Communication Standard (GHS)

OSHA revised its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to align with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) and published it in the Federal Register in March 2012 (77 FR 17574). Two significant changes contained in the revised standard require the use of new labeling elements and a standardized format for Safety Data Sheets (SDSs), formerly known as, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs). The new label elements and SDS requirements will improve worker understanding of the hazards associated with the chemicals in their workplace. To help companies comply with the revised standard, OSHA is phasing in the specific requirements over several years (December 1, 2013 to June 1, 2016).

The first compliance date of the revised HCS is December 1, 2013. By that time employers must have trained their workers on the new label elements and the SDS format. This training is needed early in the transition process since workers are already beginning to see the new labels and SDSs on the chemicals in their workplace. To ensure employees have the information they need to better protect themselves from chemical hazards in the workplace during the transition period, it is critical that employees understand the new label and SDS formats.

The list below contains the minimum required topics for the training that must be completed by December 1, 2013.

Training on label elements must include information on:

• Type of information the employee would expect to see on the new labels, including the

Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can be (but is not limited to) the chemical name, code number or batch number. The manufacturer, importer or distributor can decide the appropriate product identifier. The same product identifier must be both on the label and in Section 1 of the SDS (Identification).

Signal word: used to indicate the relative level of severity of hazard and alert the reader to a potential hazard on the label. There are only two signal words, “Danger” and “Warning.” Within a specific hazard class, “Danger” is used for the more severe hazards and “Warning” is used for the less severe hazards. There will only be one signal word on the label no matter how many hazards a chemical may have. If one of the hazards warrants a “Danger” signal word and another warrants the signal word “Warning,” then only “Danger” should appear on the label.

Pictogram: OSHA’s required pictograms must be in the shape of a square set at a point and include a black hazard symbol on a white background with a red frame sufficiently wide enough to be clearly visible. A square red frame set at a point without a hazard symbol is not a pictogram and is not permitted on the label. OSHA has designated eight pictograms under this standard for application to a hazard category.

Hazard statement(s): describe the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including, where appropriate, the degree of hazard. For example: “Causes damage to kidneys through prolonged or repeated exposure when absorbed through the skin.” All of the applicable hazard statements must appear on the label. Hazard statements may be combined where appropriate to reduce redundancies and improve readability. The hazard statements are specific to the hazard classification categories, and chemical users should always see the same statement for the same hazards, no matter what the chemical is or who produces it.

Precautionary statement(s): means a phrase that describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical or improper storage or handling.

Name, address and phone number of the chemical manufacturer, distributor, or importer

• How an employee might use the labels in the workplace. For example,

✓ Explain how information on the label can be used to ensure proper storage of hazardous chemicals.

✓ Explain how the information on the label might be used to quickly locate information on first aid when needed by employees or emergency personnel.

• General understanding of how the elements work together on a label. For example,

✓ Explain that where a chemical has multiple hazards, different pictograms are used to identify the various hazards. The employee should expect to see the appropriate pictogram for the corresponding hazard class. ✓ Explain that when there are similar precautionary statements, the one providing the most protective information will be included on the label.

Training on the format of the SDS must include information on:

• Standardized 16-section format, including the type of information found in the various sections

✓ For example, the employee should be instructed that with the new format, Section 8 (Exposure Controls/Personal Protection) will always contain information about exposure limits, engineering controls and ways to protect yourself, including personal protective equipment.

• How the information on the label is related to the SDS✓ For example, explain that the precautionary statements would be the same on the label and on the SDS.

As referenced in Dr. Michaels’ OSHA Training Standards Policy Statement (April 28, 2010) – with all training, OSHA requires employers to present information in a manner and language that their employees can understand. If employers customarily need to communicate work instructions or other workplace information to employees in a language other than English, they will also need to provide safety and health training to employees in the same manner. Similarly, if the employee’s vocabulary is limited, the training must account for that limitation. By the same token, if employees are not literate, telling them to read training materials will not satisfy the employer’s training obligation.

OSHA’s Hazard Communication website (http://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/index.html) has the following QuickCards and OSHA Briefs to assist employers with the required training.

• Label QuickCard (English/Spanish)

• Pictogram QuickCard (English/Spanish)

• Safety Data Sheet QuickCard (English) (Spanish)

• Safety Data Sheet OSHA Brief

• Label/Pictogram OSHA Brief (to come)

This is one in a series of informational fact sheets highlighting OSHA programs, policies or standards. It does not impose any new compliance requirements. For a comprehensive list of compliance requirements of OSHA standards or regulations, refer to Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This information will be made available to sensory-impaired individuals upon request. The voice phone is (202) 693-1999; teletypewriter (TTY) number: (877) 889-5627.

DSG FS-3642 02/2013

 

OSHA QuickTakes – March 1, 2013

image002

In this issue

 

 


 

Hazard Communication resources available to help employers comply with new training and labeling requirements

 

GHS Hazard Communications

 

Two new compliance assistance resources are available for employers to assist them in meeting the requirements of OSHA’s revised Hazard Communication Standard. A new fact sheet (PDF*) discusses the training topics that employers must cover for the initial Dec. 1, 2013 deadline. By this date, employers must train workers on the new label elements and safety data sheet format. In addition, a new OSHA brief (PDF*) explains the new labeling elements, identifies what goes on a label, and describes what pictograms are and how to use them. The brief also provides manufacturers, importers, distributors and other employers with a step-by-step guide to create a label that meets the requirements of the revised standard. The deadline for adopting the new labels and pictograms is June 1, 2015.

 

OSHA’s updated standard, which is aligned with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, provides a common and coherent approach to classifying chemicals and communicating hazard information on labels and safety data sheets. The revised standard is improving the quality and consistency of hazard information in the workplace, making it safer for workers by providing easily understandable information on appropriate handling and safe use of hazardous chemicals. Additional information and resources are available on OSHA’s Hazard Communications page.

 


 

Study finds a higher rate of roof fatalities among roofers in residential construction: younger, Hispanic, racial minorities and immigrant workers also had higher rates

 

A new NIOSH-funded study on fatalities in the construction industry suggests roofers in residential construction are among those most likely to die in falls from roofs.

 

OSHA's Fall Prevention Campaign

 

The study, “Fatal falls from roofs among U.S. construction workers,” finds that “the odds of fatal falls from roofs were higher for roofing and residential construction than any other construction sector.” Other groups with higher rates of fatal falls from roofs included workers younger than 20 years or older than 44 years, racial minorities, Hispanics, and immigrant workers. Workers in southern regions also had a higher rate of fatal falls compared to the construction industry as a whole. The authors emphasize the need for employer compliance with OSHA fall protection regulations and effective training in a language and vocabulary workers can understand. For more information about preventing fatal falls in construction, visit http://www.osha.gov/stopfalls/index.html. The study examined trends and patterns of fatal falls from roofs in the U.S. construction industry over an 18-year period (1992–2009), with detailed analysis for 2003–2009.

 

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OSHA cites Highway Technologies for 10 safety violations after worker killed on guard rail project near Menomonie, Wis.

 

OSHA has cited Highway Technologies Inc. in Minneapolis for 10 safety – including six willful – violations after a worker died from injuries sustained while working with equipment that came into contact with overhead power lines on I-94 near Menomonie, Wis., on Sept. 17, 2012. Proposed penalties total $448,000.

 

“Highway Technologies failed to protect its workers from serious electrocution hazards,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. “Multiple instances of the same violation over a period of time clearly demonstrate a willful failure to comply with basic safety and health standards. Employers must take steps to eliminate hazards and provide a safe working environment.”

 

Due to the nature of the hazards and the violations cited, Highway Technologies Inc. has been placed in OSHA’s Severe Violator Enforcement Program, which mandates targeted follow-up inspections to ensure future compliance with the law. For more information, read the press release.

 


 

Norfolk Southern Railway Co. ordered to pay $1.1 million after terminating 3 workers for reporting injuries; Union Pacific Railroad also found in violation of Federal Railroad Safety Act

 

Norfolk Southern Railway Co. has been ordered to pay $1,121,099 to three workers following an OSHA investigation, which found that the company violated the whistleblower provisions of the Federal Railroad Safety Act. Two investigations, conducted by OSHA staff in Chicago and Pittsburgh, found that three employees were wrongfully fired for reporting workplace injuries.

 

“The Labor Department continues to find serious whistleblower violations at Norfolk Southern, and we will be steadfast in our defense of a worker’s right to a safe job – including his or her right to report injuries,” said acting Secretary of Labor Seth D. Harris. “When workers can’t report safety concerns on the job without fear of retaliation, worker safety and health suffer, which costs working families and businesses alike.” For more information on this case, read the press release.

 

In a separate case, OSHA found that Union Pacific Railroad Co. in Pocatello, Idaho, also violated the whistleblower protection provisions of the FRSA and has ordered the railroad to pay more than $309,000 in back wages, benefits, damages and reasonable attorney’s fees to a conductor after determining retaliation for reporting a co-worker’s work-related injury. For more information, read the press release.

 

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OSHA concludes fatality investigation at San Francisco VA Medical Center research laboratory, issues violation notices

 

OSHA has issued a notice of unsafe and unhealthful working conditions to the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center after concluding its investigation into the death of Richard Din, a research associate at the center’s research laboratory in April 2012. The notice consists of three serious violations for failing to protect laboratory workers researching Neisseria meningitidis, a bacterium that can cause meningitis.

 

The three serious violations include failure to require workers to use a safety enclosure when performing microbiological work with a viable bacteria culture; provide training on the signs and symptoms of illnesses as a result of employee exposure to a viable bacteria culture, such as meningitis; and provide available vaccines for workers potentially exposed to bacteria. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known. For more information, read the news release.

 


 

OSHA cites 3 companies after combustible dust flash fire claims lives of 2 workers at Texas work site

 

OSHA has cited Watco Mechanical Services, Jordan General Contractors Inc. and JP Electric after a combustible dust flash fire claimed the lives of two workers at a Hockley work site. OSHA began its investigation Aug. 19, 2012, at the Watco Mechanical Services work site where workers were conducting blasting operations in the facility’s tank and hopper building. Employees were cutting metal with a torch when a fire broke out, killing two workers employed by Magnolia, Texas-based Jordan General Contractors.

 

The three companies were cited a total of 22 violations, including failing to adequately control fugitive emissions of combustible dust; develop and implement a respiratory program; provide training on the hazards of working with combustible dust; and ensure cutting operations are halted in the presence of combustible dust. Proposed penalties for the three companies total $119,840. See the news release for more information.

 

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OSHA announces interim final rule, invites public comment on whistleblower protections for reporting violations of Affordable Care Act’s health insurance reforms

 

Whistleblower Protection Program logo

 

OSHA has published an interim final rule in the Federal Register that governs whistleblower complaints filed under Section 1558 of the Affordable Care Act. The Affordable Care Act protect employees against retaliation by an employer for reporting alleged violations of Title I of the act or for receiving a tax credit or cost-sharing reduction as a result of participating in a Health Insurance Exchange or Marketplace.

 

If an employee reports a violation of one of these policies or requirements, the act’s whistleblower provision prohibits employers from retaliating against the employee. A fact sheet about filing whistleblower complaints under the Affordable Care Act is available at http://www.osha.gov/Publications/whistleblower/OSHAFS-3641.pdf.* For more information, read the news release.

 


 

New OSHA Web page warns of hydrogen sulfide exposure

 

OSHA’s new Hydrogen Sulfide Web page warns employers and workers of the dangerous health effects from breathing hydrogen sulfide and provides methods for controlling exposure to this toxic gas.

 

Hydrogen sulphide Safety and Health Topics page

 

Hydrogen sulfide, or H2S, is a colorless and highly flammable gas produced in industries such as mining, oil and gas refining, and paper and pulp processing. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicate H2S caused 60 worker deaths between 2001 and 2010. The effects on workers’ health depend on how much of the gas workers breathe but symptoms can range from headaches, nausea and fatigue to respiratory tract irritation, unconsciousness and death. The Web page explains how training and the use of exhaust/ventilation systems and personal protective equipment can protect workers from harmful H2S exposure.

 

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Help for Construction Employers: New fact sheets help employers minimize exposure to silica when using construction equipment

 

OSHA has published seven new educational resources to help employers control exposure to respirable crystalline silica at construction sites. The new fact sheets provide information for employers and for workers who operate handheld grinders, angle grinders, jackhammers, rotary hammers, stationary masonry saws, handheld masonry saws or vehicle-mounted drilling rigs.

 

Masonry saw uses water to control silica dust
Handheld masonry saw using water for dust control while cutting cinder blocks. (Photo courtesy of New Jersey Department of Health.)

 

Respirable silica dust is a common hazard at many construction sites. Workers who breathe high concentrations of silica day after day are at risk of developing silicosis, a progressive and potentially disabling lung disease. Exposure to silica dust also can increase the risk of lung cancer and has been linked to other diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and kidney and autoimmune diseases. For more information on the hazards of silica exposure in the construction industry, visit OSHA’s Crystalline Silica Safety and Health Topics Page and read OSHA’s educational publication on Controlling Silica Exposures in Construction (PDF*).

 


 

General Industry Digest

 

OSHA’s General Industry and Construction Digests spell out summary of OSHA standards (available free)

 

OSHA’s General Industry Digest and Construction Industry Digest summarize safety and health standards to help employers, supervisors, workers, health and safety committee members, and safety and health personnel learn about OSHA standards in the workplace. The two digests contain summaries of OSHA standards that are frequently cited or cover particular hazardous situations in general industry and construction. The General Industry Digest includes updated information on revisions to General Industry standards since the digest was last published in 2001. A Spanish-language version of the Construction Industry Digest (PDF*) is also available.

 

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Special Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health meeting scheduled for March

 

OSHA will hold a special meeting of the Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health March 18, 2013, in Washington, D.C. ACCSH will consider a proposed rule to update OSHA’s standard on accident prevention signs in construction based on updates to national consensus standards.

 

The meeting will be held from 1- 4 p.m. in Room N-3437 A-C, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20210. Committee members outside of the Washington, D.C. area will participate over the phone. The meeting is open to the public. Comments and requests to speak must be submitted by March 8. See the Federal Register notice for submission details. ACCSH advises the secretary of labor and assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health on construction standards and policy matters. For more information, read the press release.

 

Construction Industry

 


 

OSHA reminds employers to post injury/illness summaries

 

OSHA's Form 300A

 

OSHA is reminding employers to post OSHA’s Form 300A, which summarizes the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred during 2012 and were logged on OSHA Form 300, Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses. The summary must be posted between Feb. 1 and April 30, 2013, and should be displayed in a common area where notices to employees are usually posted.

 

Employers with 10 or fewer employees and employers in less hazardous industries are normally exempt from federal OSHA injury and illness recordkeeping and posting requirements. A complete list of exempt industries in the retail, services, finance, insurance and real estate sectors can be found at http://s.dol.gov/YP. Read the news release for more information on recordkeeping requirements.

 

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