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“Workplace Injuries By The Numbers” – Infographic” #Injuries #Workplace

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Forklift Safety – “Are Your Employees Trained Properly?”

Note: This video may sound and seem funny, but it’s not, these are dangerous acts and accidents!

Frequently Asked Questions about Powered Industrial Truck Operator Training


The powered industrial truck operator training requirements apply to all industries where trucks are being used, except agricultural operations.

1. What is the definition of a powered industrial truck?

Any mobile power-propelled truck used to carry, push, pull, lift, stack or tier materials. Powered industrial trucks can be ridden or controlled by a walking operator. Earth moving and over the road haulage trucks are not included in the definition. Equipment that was designed to move earth but has been modified to accept forks are also not included.

2. What does the standard require?

The standard requires employers to develop and implement a training program based on the general principles of safe truck operation, the types of vehicle(s) being used in the workplace, the hazards of the workplace created by the use of the vehicle(s), and the general safety requirements of the OSHA standard. Trained operators must know how to do the job properly and do it safely as demonstrated by workplace evaluation. Formal (lecture, video, etc.) and practical (demonstration and practical exercises) training must be provided. Employers must also certify that each operator has received the training and evaluate each operator at least once every three years. Prior to operating the truck in the workplace, the employer must evaluate the operator’s performance and determine the operator to be competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely. Refresher training is needed whenever an operator demonstrates a deficiency in the safe operation of the truck.

3. Does OSHA provide a list of topics to include in my training program?

Yes. The standard provides a list of training topics; however, the employer may exclude those topics which are not relevant to safe operation at the employee’s work location.

4. Who should conduct the training?

All training and evaluation must be conducted by persons with the necessary knowledge, training, and experience to train powered industrial truck operators and evaluate their competence. An example of a qualified trainer would be a person who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience has demonstrated the ability to train and evaluate powered industrial truck operators.

There are many resources available to the employer if he/she chooses not to perform the training himself. Truck manufacturers, local safety and health safety organizations, such as the National Safety Council local chapters, private consultants with expertise in powered industrial trucks, local trade and vocational schools are some available resources.

Various Internet sites are devoted to forklift safety. Private companies who provide forklift safety training services, including videos and written programs, can be located on various Internet websites. Most videos can be either leased or purchased. One important thing to remember is that simply by showing employees a video or videos on some aspect of forklift safety does not meet the full requirements of the OSHA standard. Site specific information must be conveyed as well as a method to evaluate the employee’s acquired knowledge subsequent to the training.

5. If my employees receive training from an outside consultant, how will I know that these employees have been adequately trained?

Outside qualified training organizations can provide evidence that the employee has successfully completed the relevant classroom and practical training. However, each employer must ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation.

6. My employees receive training from the union on the use of powered industrial trucks. Will I have to provide any additional training?

When a worker reports to work, the employer must evaluate the employee to ensure that he/she is knowledgeable about the operation of the powered industrial trucks he/she will be assigned to operate. This evaluation could be as simple as having a person with the requisite skills, knowledge and experience observe the operator performing several typical operations to ensure that the truck is being operated safely and asking the operator a few questions related to the safe operation of the vehicle. If the operator has operated the same type of equipment before in the same type of environment that he/she will be expected to be working, then duplicative or additional training is not required.

7. Is testing required?

No. The standard does not specifically require testing; however, some method of evaluation is necessary.

8. Does OSHA require the employer to issue licenses to employees who have received training?

No. The OSHA standard does not require employees to be licensed. An employer may choose to issue licenses to trained operators.

9. What type of records or documentation must I keep?

The OSHA standard requires that the employer certify that each operator has received the training and has been evaluated. The written certification record must include the name of the operator, the date of the training, the date of the evaluation, and the identify of the person(s) performing the training or evaluation.

10. How long must I keep the certification records?

Employers who evaluate the operator’s performance more frequently than every three years may retain the most recent certification record; otherwise, certification records must be maintained for three years.

11. If my employees receive training, but accidents still continue to occur, what should I do?

Refresher training in relevant topics is necessary when the operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident.

12. Is annual training required?

No. An evaluation of each powered industrial truck operator’s performance is required to be conducted after initial training, after refresher training, and at least once every three years.

13. How often must refresher training be given?

The standard does not require any specific frequency of refresher training. Refresher training must be provided when:

  1. The operator has been observed to operate the vehicle in an unsafe manner.
  2. The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident.
  3. The operator has received an evaluation that reveals that the operator is not operating the truck safely.
  4. The operator is assigned to drive a different type of truck.
  5. A condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect safety operation of the truck.

14. If my employees have already received training, or have been operating trucks for many years, must I retrain them?

No. An employer does not need to retrain an employee in the operation of a powered industrial truck if the employer certifies that the operator has been evaluated and has proven to be competent to operate the truck safely. The operator would need additional training in those elements where his or her performance indicates the need for further training and for new types of equipment and areas of operation.

15. How do I evaluate my employee’s competency to operate a truck safely?

Evaluation of an operator’s performance can be determined by a number of ways, such as:

  • a discussion with the employee
  • an observation of the employee operating the powered industrial truck
  • written documentation of previous training
  • a performance test

16. Does OSHA provide training to my truck operators?

No. It is the employer’s responsibility to train the employees.

17. Do I have to train all employees in my workplace?

Any employee that operates a powered industrial truck must be trained.

18. Do I have to ensure that my operator’s are physically capable of driving a powered industry truck?

The new standard does not contain provisions for checking vision, hearing or general medical status of employees operating powered industrial trucks. The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) addresses the issue of whether employers may impose physical qualifications upon employees or applicants for employment. The ADA permits employers to adopt medical qualification requirements which are necessary to assure that an individual does not pose a “direct threat to the health or safety of other individuals in the workplace” provided all reasonable efforts are made to accommodate otherwise qualified individuals.

19. I have three different types of trucks in my workplace. Can I provide training on just one type of truck?

If an operator will be expected to operate all three types of vehicles, then training must address the unique characteristics of each type of vehicle the employee is expected to operate. When an attachment is used on the truck to move odd-shaped materials, then the operator training must include instruction on the safe conduct of those operations so that the operator knows and understands the restrictions or limitations created by each vehicle’s use.

20. I only have powered hand trucks in my workplace. Do the training requirements cover the operators of this type of vehicle? The operator walks alongside the unit while holding onto the handle to guide it.

Yes. The use of powered hand trucks present numerous hazards to employees who operate them and those working in the area where they are used.

21. I employ drivers from a temporary agency. Who provides them training – the temporary service or me?

OSHA has issued several letters of interpretations on the subject of training of temporary employees. Basically, there is a shared responsibility for assuring employees are adequately trained. The responsibility for providing training should be spelled out in the contractual agreement between the two parties. The temporary agency or the contracting employer may conduct the training and evaluation of operators from a temporary agency as required by the standard; however, the host employer (or other employer who enters into a contract with the temporary agency) must provide site-specific information and training on the use of the particular types of trucks and workplace-related topics that are present in the workplace.

22. Should my training include the use of operator restraint devices (e.g. seat belts)?

Employers are required to train employees in all operating instructions, warnings, and precautions listed in the operator’s manual for the type of vehicle which the employee is being trained to operate. Therefore, operators must be trained in the use of operator restraint systems when it is addressed in the operating instructions.

23. What does OSHA expect to achieve as a result of improved operator’s training?

OSHA’s goal is to reduce the number of injuries and illnesses that occur to workers in the workplace from unsafe powered industrial truck usage. By providing an effective training program many other benefits will result. Among these are the lower cost of compensation insurance, less property damage, and less product damage.

24. Where can I get additional information about OSHA standards?

For more information, contact your local or Regional OSHA office (listed in the telephone directory under United States Government – Department of Labor – Occupational Safety and Health Administration). OSHA also has a Home Page on the Internet.

 

Join The National Safety Council – “Journey to Safety Excellence”

The Journey to Safety Excellence is a roadmap to help you build a workplace that keeps people safe. It comes with free, practical tools collected from 100 years of experience. Improve how you keep your employees safe!

​Successful organizations – no matter the size or industry – take safety seriously because employees are their most important asset. They know that providing a caring environment can boost employee morale, increase productivity and lower costs. Be one of those companies. Join today

“​The National Safety Council has been an important partner throughout OSHA’s history. Their newest initiative, the
Journey to Safety Excellence, is essential in helping a company or organization become successful in their quest for and commitment to workplace safety.”
Dr. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health

Join the program today and help your company be a leader in workplace safety!

Join here: http://www.nsc.org/learn/NSC-Initiatives/Pages/journey-to-safety-excellence.aspx?utm_medium=%28none%29&utm_source=%28direct%29&utm_campaign=journey

Source: National Safety Council

“OSHA Announces Top 10 Violations For Fiscal Year 2014”

OSHA Top 10 Cited in 2014

Speaking at the 2014 National Safety Council Congress and Expo, Patrick Kapust, deputy director of OSHA’s Directorate of Enforcement Programs, shared preliminary numbers for the top 10 most frequently cited OSHA standards in fiscal year (FY) 2014. Keep reading to find out what made the cut this year and how you can avoid these common hazards in your facility.

While some items on the list shifted position within the top ten, all of the standards on this year’s list made an appearance last year. Notably, the top four violations—fall protection in construction, hazard communication, scaffolding in construction, and respiratory protection—appeared in exactly the same order in FY 2013 and FY 2012.

While the ranking of the top ten violations remains relatively static compared to previous years, the total number of violations cited is somewhat lower than the FY 2013 figure. This is partially due to the 3-week government shutdown in October 2013, during which OSHA lost the opportunity to conduct between 1,400 and 1,500 inspections. However, Kapust emphasized that OSHA is working to make up for the lost time, and the numbers are preliminary.

The top 10 most frequently cited standards for FY 2014 are as follows:

  1. Fall protection in construction (29 CFR 1926.501): 6,143 violations. Lack of fall protection has been a leading offender for several years. Common mistakes under this standard include failing to provide fall protection to employees working at heights, unprotected sides and edges, failing to use fall protection equipment correctly, and failing to provide protection from falling objects. In many cases, a fall protection program is completely nonexistent. Roofing and framing contractors, as well as single-family residential construction employers, are frequent violators of the fall protection standard.
  2. Hazard communication (29 CFR 1910.1200): 5,161 violations. Common hazard communication mistakes include failing to have a written program, failing to have safety data sheets (SDSs) for each chemical in the workplace, labeling mistakes, lack of employee training, and failing to provide employees with information on the hazards of the chemicals in the workplace. Significantly, Kapust commented that the 2012 changes to the hazard communication standard did not correspond to a significant number of violations; rather, most HazCom violations deal with much more basic mistakes that would also have been violations under the previous version of the standard.
  3. Scaffolding in construction (29 CFR 1926.451: 4,029 violations. Citations under the construction industry scaffolding standard often stem from scaffolds that are not fully planked, a lack of portable or hook ladders to access scaffold platforms, loading scaffolds in excess of their capacity, and failing to protect employees from fall hazards on scaffolds.
  4. Respiratory protection (29 CFR 1910.134): 3,223 violations. Lack of a written program is the most commonly cited part of the respiratory protection standard. Other common mistakes include not performing a medical evaluation on employees who must wear respirators, failing to select and provide a respirator appropriate for the activity, failing to conduct fit testing, and failing to train employees.
  5. Lockout/tagout (29 CFR 1910.147): 2,704 violations. Many citations are issues under the lockout/tagout standard for the complete lack of a hazardous energy control program. Other common mistakes include failing to apply locks and tags as necessary and failing to remove unauthorized employees from the area during equipment service and maintenance. Notably, Kapust mentioned that lack of training was not one of the most frequently cited parts of the standard, which he attributed to the fact that employers who fail to provide training often lack a lockout/tagout program altogether and thus would be cited for that instead.
  6. Powered industrial trucks (29 CFR 1910.178): 2,662 violations. Lack of operator training is the most common pitfall under this standard. Other common mistakes include forklifts that are not in safe operating condition and modifications and additions that are not approved by the forklift manufacturer. Industries that frequently violate this standard include warehousing and storage and machine shops.
  7. Electrical, wiring methods (29 CFR 1910.305): 2,490 violations. Citations under this standard often occur when flexible cords are used in place of fixed wiring, conductors enter boxes unprotected, employees are exposed to live contacts, and circuit boxes are not designed to prevent moisture from entering.
  8. Ladders in construction (29 CFR 1926.1053): 2,448 violations. Common ladder hazards include using a ladder not designed for the load it is carrying, using extension ladders that do not provide enough overhang at the top to ensure stability, and using an inappropriate type of ladder for the job.
  9. Machine guarding (29 CFR 1910.212): 2,200 violations. To prevent machine guarding violations, employers should make sure to guard point of operation hazards, ingoing nip points, blades, rotating parts, and any other part of the machinery that may pose a hazard. Make sure that guards remain in place and are not removed by employees.
  10. Electrical, general requirements (29 CFR 1910.303): 2,056 violations. To prevent these citations, employers should ensure that qualified and unqualified workers are appropriately trained for their job tasks to avoid electric shock and electrocution.

Source: BLR® See original post here:

http://safety.blr.com/workplace-safety-news/safety-administration/OSHA-and-state-safety-compliance-enforcement/OSHA-announces-top-10-violations-for-FY-2014/

Forklift Safety – “Are Your Employees Trained Properly?”

Note: This video may sound and seem funny, but it’s not, these are dangerous acts and accidents!

Frequently Asked Questions about Powered Industrial Truck Operator Training


The powered industrial truck operator training requirements apply to all industries where trucks are being used, except agricultural operations.

1. What is the definition of a powered industrial truck?

Any mobile power-propelled truck used to carry, push, pull, lift, stack or tier materials. Powered industrial trucks can be ridden or controlled by a walking operator. Earth moving and over the road haulage trucks are not included in the definition. Equipment that was designed to move earth but has been modified to accept forks are also not included.

2. What does the standard require?

The standard requires employers to develop and implement a training program based on the general principles of safe truck operation, the types of vehicle(s) being used in the workplace, the hazards of the workplace created by the use of the vehicle(s), and the general safety requirements of the OSHA standard. Trained operators must know how to do the job properly and do it safely as demonstrated by workplace evaluation. Formal (lecture, video, etc.) and practical (demonstration and practical exercises) training must be provided. Employers must also certify that each operator has received the training and evaluate each operator at least once every three years. Prior to operating the truck in the workplace, the employer must evaluate the operator’s performance and determine the operator to be competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely. Refresher training is needed whenever an operator demonstrates a deficiency in the safe operation of the truck.

3. Does OSHA provide a list of topics to include in my training program?

Yes. The standard provides a list of training topics; however, the employer may exclude those topics which are not relevant to safe operation at the employee’s work location.

4. Who should conduct the training?

All training and evaluation must be conducted by persons with the necessary knowledge, training, and experience to train powered industrial truck operators and evaluate their competence. An example of a qualified trainer would be a person who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience has demonstrated the ability to train and evaluate powered industrial truck operators.

There are many resources available to the employer if he/she chooses not to perform the training himself. Truck manufacturers, local safety and health safety organizations, such as the National Safety Council local chapters, private consultants with expertise in powered industrial trucks, local trade and vocational schools are some available resources.

Various Internet sites are devoted to forklift safety. Private companies who provide forklift safety training services, including videos and written programs, can be located on various Internet websites. Most videos can be either leased or purchased. One important thing to remember is that simply by showing employees a video or videos on some aspect of forklift safety does not meet the full requirements of the OSHA standard. Site specific information must be conveyed as well as a method to evaluate the employee’s acquired knowledge subsequent to the training.

5. If my employees receive training from an outside consultant, how will I know that these employees have been adequately trained?

Outside qualified training organizations can provide evidence that the employee has successfully completed the relevant classroom and practical training. However, each employer must ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation.

6. My employees receive training from the union on the use of powered industrial trucks. Will I have to provide any additional training?

When a worker reports to work, the employer must evaluate the employee to ensure that he/she is knowledgeable about the operation of the powered industrial trucks he/she will be assigned to operate. This evaluation could be as simple as having a person with the requisite skills, knowledge and experience observe the operator performing several typical operations to ensure that the truck is being operated safely and asking the operator a few questions related to the safe operation of the vehicle. If the operator has operated the same type of equipment before in the same type of environment that he/she will be expected to be working, then duplicative or additional training is not required.

7. Is testing required?

No. The standard does not specifically require testing; however, some method of evaluation is necessary.

8. Does OSHA require the employer to issue licenses to employees who have received training?

No. The OSHA standard does not require employees to be licensed. An employer may choose to issue licenses to trained operators.

9. What type of records or documentation must I keep?

The OSHA standard requires that the employer certify that each operator has received the training and has been evaluated. The written certification record must include the name of the operator, the date of the training, the date of the evaluation, and the identify of the person(s) performing the training or evaluation.

10. How long must I keep the certification records?

Employers who evaluate the operator’s performance more frequently than every three years may retain the most recent certification record; otherwise, certification records must be maintained for three years.

11. If my employees receive training, but accidents still continue to occur, what should I do?

Refresher training in relevant topics is necessary when the operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident.

12. Is annual training required?

No. An evaluation of each powered industrial truck operator’s performance is required to be conducted after initial training, after refresher training, and at least once every three years.

13. How often must refresher training be given?

The standard does not require any specific frequency of refresher training. Refresher training must be provided when:

  1. The operator has been observed to operate the vehicle in an unsafe manner.
  2. The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident.
  3. The operator has received an evaluation that reveals that the operator is not operating the truck safely.
  4. The operator is assigned to drive a different type of truck.
  5. A condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect safety operation of the truck.

14. If my employees have already received training, or have been operating trucks for many years, must I retrain them?

No. An employer does not need to retrain an employee in the operation of a powered industrial truck if the employer certifies that the operator has been evaluated and has proven to be competent to operate the truck safely. The operator would need additional training in those elements where his or her performance indicates the need for further training and for new types of equipment and areas of operation.

15. How do I evaluate my employee’s competency to operate a truck safely?

Evaluation of an operator’s performance can be determined by a number of ways, such as:

  • a discussion with the employee
  • an observation of the employee operating the powered industrial truck
  • written documentation of previous training
  • a performance test

16. Does OSHA provide training to my truck operators?

No. It is the employer’s responsibility to train the employees.

17. Do I have to train all employees in my workplace?

Any employee that operates a powered industrial truck must be trained.

18. Do I have to ensure that my operator’s are physically capable of driving a powered industry truck?

The new standard does not contain provisions for checking vision, hearing or general medical status of employees operating powered industrial trucks. The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) addresses the issue of whether employers may impose physical qualifications upon employees or applicants for employment. The ADA permits employers to adopt medical qualification requirements which are necessary to assure that an individual does not pose a “direct threat to the health or safety of other individuals in the workplace” provided all reasonable efforts are made to accommodate otherwise qualified individuals.

19. I have three different types of trucks in my workplace. Can I provide training on just one type of truck?

If an operator will be expected to operate all three types of vehicles, then training must address the unique characteristics of each type of vehicle the employee is expected to operate. When an attachment is used on the truck to move odd-shaped materials, then the operator training must include instruction on the safe conduct of those operations so that the operator knows and understands the restrictions or limitations created by each vehicle’s use.

20. I only have powered hand trucks in my workplace. Do the training requirements cover the operators of this type of vehicle? The operator walks alongside the unit while holding onto the handle to guide it.

Yes. The use of powered hand trucks present numerous hazards to employees who operate them and those working in the area where they are used.

21. I employ drivers from a temporary agency. Who provides them training – the temporary service or me?

OSHA has issued several letters of interpretations on the subject of training of temporary employees. Basically, there is a shared responsibility for assuring employees are adequately trained. The responsibility for providing training should be spelled out in the contractual agreement between the two parties. The temporary agency or the contracting employer may conduct the training and evaluation of operators from a temporary agency as required by the standard; however, the host employer (or other employer who enters into a contract with the temporary agency) must provide site-specific information and training on the use of the particular types of trucks and workplace-related topics that are present in the workplace.

22. Should my training include the use of operator restraint devices (e.g. seat belts)?

Employers are required to train employees in all operating instructions, warnings, and precautions listed in the operator’s manual for the type of vehicle which the employee is being trained to operate. Therefore, operators must be trained in the use of operator restraint systems when it is addressed in the operating instructions.

23. What does OSHA expect to achieve as a result of improved operator’s training?

OSHA’s goal is to reduce the number of injuries and illnesses that occur to workers in the workplace from unsafe powered industrial truck usage. By providing an effective training program many other benefits will result. Among these are the lower cost of compensation insurance, less property damage, and less product damage.

24. Where can I get additional information about OSHA standards?

For more information, contact your local or Regional OSHA office (listed in the telephone directory under United States Government – Department of Labor – Occupational Safety and Health Administration). OSHA also has a Home Page on the Internet.

 

“The True Cost of Workplace Injuries” [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

The True Cost of a Workplace Injury Infographic

Infographic Courtesy of the National Safety Council®

What Truly Motivates People & Motivating Employees for Safety Success

Fantastic Video Presentation on Motivating in the Workplace!

A common concern to safety professionals across industries and countries is how to maintain a high level of motivation among employees at all levels for safety. What really motivates employees to become engaged in the safety effort?

Thomas Krause, Ph.D., CEO of Behavioral Science Technology Inc., Ojai, Calif., helped to answer this question for attendees at the National Safety Council”s (NSC) Congress Wednesday in Orlando, Fla.

Krause outlined the common approaches to maintaining motivation and provided a critique of each one.

1. Slogans and Posters. Krause said these are useful when they are consistent with what is going on in the organization.

“If you put a sign up in your plant that says ”Safety is No.1” and isn”t true, it doesn”t belong there,” said Krause.

2. The kick-in-the-rear method. Krause said this method is outmoded, ineffective and requires constant supervision.

3. Discipline. If done fairly and consistently, Krause said it is an important part of safety. However, he warns that discipline will not effect motivation in an effective way and it can have significant side effects.

4. Gain Sharing Programs. Gain sharing programs are broader than safety incentive programs and apply to different performance areas of a company, such as production and finance.

Krause said these are a double-edged sword. “I would suggest not using this method as a way of motivating your employees, but if you are going to do it, include safety and look for a measure other than incident frequency rate,” he said.

5. Safety Incentives. Krause believes that safety incentives are more negative than positive when it comes to motivating employees. “Safety incentives don”t send the right message, they are not an accurate form of feedback and they don”t actually motivate the right behavior,” noted Krause.

6. Engaging the employee in improving the safety process. This method, said Krause, is the best way to motivate employees and get them connected to the safety function.

“Safety motivation for employees comes when they are connected with the work they are doing on an intellectual, emotional, creative and physical level,” said Krause. “It has to have meaning for them in order to motivate them.”

How do you engage employees in the real world? Krause noted that the following mechanisms are ways to will help to involve employees on all of those levels.

Allow employees to:

  • participate in the purchase of personal protective equipment;
  • be on problem solving committees;
  • make safety suggestions; and
  • conduct safety evaluations.

Perhaps this will bring you more success to your motivational or reward program? Thoughts are welcome!

 

Don’t “Duck” Out On Safety At Work, At Home and At Play

The National Safety Council (NSC), a not-for-profit organization dedicated to educating Americans on safety and health and stopping as many of the millions of preventable injuries a year as possible, will be celebrating its 100th anniversary in a few years.  The organization, originally named the National Council for Industrial Safety, was established on October 13, 1913 after a small group of industrial leaders from the Midwest concerned for American workers’ safety met in Milwaukee.

While educating Americans on safety, its statistics on injuries in the workplace are an important source of information for loss prevention efforts. The NSC also publishes and disseminates information on safety.  Over the years, the NSC has provided safety and health information on work-related exposures as well as those experienced at home.

Look for fact sheets on their website to share with your employees as well as your family.  You will find information on Spring & Summer Safety, Agricultural Safety, outdoor safety, and topics covering safety at home and safety on the road.

NSC develops fact sheets to help you easily obtain and share information on critical safety and health topics. Please use the social sharing buttons on each page to inform your coworkers and their families of the numerous safety facts and tips offered here. Our fact sheets are also available in PDF download format for your printing ease.

Outside the Home
 
Backpack Safety
Canoe Safety
Electrical Safety
Halloween Safety
Holiday Season Safety
Horseback Riding & Children
How to Lift & Carry Safely
Ice Skating Safety
Inline Skating Safety
Playground Safety
Preventing Frostbite & Hypothermia
Protecting Your Eyes from Injury
Safe Bicycling
Setting up Your Child’s Swing Set
Skateboarding Safety Tips
Ski & Snowboard Safety
Snow Shoveling
Summer & Alcohol Safety
Surviving the Cold Weather
Surviving the Hot Weather
Tips for Safer Sledding & Tobogganing
Using Fireworks Safely
Water Safety
 
 
Inside the Home
 
Air Quality Problems Caused by Floods
Baby-Proofing Your Home
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
Christmas Tree Safety
Crib Safety Tips
Develop a Safe Exercise Program
Food Safety After a Flood
Home Fire Prevention & Preparedness
How to Prevent Poisonings in Your Home
Keeping Kids Safe from Home Falls
Portable Generator Safety Tips
Preventing Slips & Falls in the Home
Utilities and Structure Safety After a Flood
Window Safety
 
 
In the Environment
 
Asbestos
Asthma
Biological Contaminants
Carbon Monoxide
Combustion Appliances
Environmental Tobacco Smoke
Formaldehyde
Ground-Level Ozone
Indoor Air Quality
Lead Poisoning
Pesticides
Radon
Sick Building Syndrome (SBS)
 
 
On the Road
Car Rental Success
Child Safety Seat Checkup Tips
Distracted Driving
Driving at Night
Driving Defensively
Drowsy Driving
Drunk Driving
Jump-Starting a Weak or Dead Automobile Battery Correctly
Pedestrian Safety
Pre-Trip Inspection
Reduce Your Risk of Becoming a Carjacking Victim
Reporting Accidents & Emergencies
Roadway Work Zone Safety
Tips for Driving with ABS (Anti-Lock Brake Systems)
Vehicle Submersion
What to Do If You Have a Blowout on the Highway
What to Do If Your Car Breaks Down on the Highway
What to Do If Your Car Catches on Fire
What to Do If Your Car Overheats
What to Do When You Are Involved in a Car Crash
What to Do When Your Brakes Fail
Winter, Your Car, and You
Young Drivers
 
School Bus Safety
 
Backing School Buses
Planning School Sites for School Bus Safety
Recommended Emergency Plans for School Bus Fleets
Recommended Procedures for School Bus Drivers at Railroad Crossings
School Bus Loading & Unloading
School Bus Safety Rules
Standees on the School Bus
 
Agricultural Safety
 
All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Safety
Anhydrous Ammonia Safety
Child Safety on the Farm
Crop Protection Chemical Safety
Falls from Tractors & Trailing Equipment
Livestock Handling
Manure Pit Gas Hazards
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Power-Take-Off (PTO) Safety
Safe Use of Hand Tools
Safe Use of Harvesting Equipment
Safety Checklist for Used Machinery Selection
Silo Gas Hazards
Sun & Heat Exposure
Tractor Safety
Year-Round Agricultural Safety & Health Promotion Ideas
Source: National Safety Council
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