New! – “NIOSH Aerial Lift Operator Simulator Program Helps Identify Hazards!” #Safety

simulation2

The NEW NIOSH Aerial Lift Hazard Recognition Simulator, which is intended to help aerial lift operators familiarize themselves with hazards they may encounter on the job is now available for download to use as a training tool at your workplace. In this instance, NIOSH uses the term “aerial lifts” to describe multiple types of lifts, including scissor lifts and boom lifts, which are commonly used on construction sites for elevating workers to various heights.

The simulator is intended to provide a safe, controlled environment in which users—employers, trainers, safety and health professionals, and aerial lift operators—can navigate a realistic workplace with different types of hazards such as potholes, ramps, crushing hazards, and tip-over hazards. The simulator notifies users when they encounter a hazard so that they can identify and avoid hazards on actual work sites.

According to NIOSH, the simulator is designed to help potential or new aerial lift operators acclimate to aerial lift operation and help experienced operators refresh their knowledge on the associated hazards. The agency stresses that the simulator is not a substitute for the required training to operate an aerial lift.

Instructions on downloading and launching the simulator can be found on the NIOSH website, along with additional information on aerial lifts.

Aerial Lifts

Aerial lifts are powered and mobile platforms that are used for elevating workers to various heights, which exposes workers to fall hazards.

Training is necessary for anyone using aerial work platforms and equipment. In an effort to create awareness about common workplace hazards when using aerial lifts, NIOSH has developed educational tools and products. Employers, trainers, safety and health professionals and aerial lift operators can use the following information to prevent work-related falls.

Note: NIOSH uses the term ‘aerial lifts’ as an overarching term to capture multiple types of lifts, such as scissor lifts and boom lifts. It is important to note that both OSHA and ANSI standards vary for different types of lifts.

Spotlight
NIOSH Aerial Lift Hazard Recognition Simulator

The Simulator, available at no cost, provides a realistic workplace with multiple, dangerous hazard types that users must navigate. Experienced aerial lift operators can refresh their knowledge, and new operators can familiarize themselves with hazards they may encounter on the job. Using the Simulator is not a substitute for required training to operate an aerial lift.

Aerial lifts, commonly used on construction sites, expose workers to falls. To prevent these falls and other aerial lift-related injuries and deaths, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) developed the Aerial Lift Hazard Recognition Simulator. This flyer gives employers, trainers, safety professionals, and aerial lift operators information on the Simulator and how to access it.

PDF File About the program is downloadable here : Aerial Lift Hazard Recognition Simulator[PDF – 979 KB]

Download the software here: NIOSH Aerial Lift Hazard Recognition Simulator today! Note that the software download is a ZIP file and can be used on any Windows based PC!

“New Research Supports OSHA Fit Testing Requirements, Says NIOSH”

image

The percentage of improperly fitted respirators increases with the length of time between worker fit tests, giving support to the annual fit-testing requirements in OSHA’s Respiratory Protection Standard, according to new research from NIOSH.

The standard requires fit testing every year and whenever an employee’s physical condition changes, such as facial scarring or an obvious change in body weight. Note that OSHA Fit Testing requires that a Doctor certify that every employee wearing a respirator, has the pulmonary function to do so and each employee MUST be certified by a Doctor prior to USING / WEARING a respirator.

For the study, NIOSH researchers focused on the commonly worn N95 filtering facepiece respirator. During a three-year period, researchers measured the fit of the respirators every six months on the volunteers, 134 of whom participated during the entire study.

Researchers found that after one year, an estimated 10 percent of workers’ respirators did not fit properly. Two and three years later, that figure rose to 20 percent and 26 percent, respectively. Additionally, nearly one-quarter of subjects who lost more than 20 pounds were unable to maintain an acceptable fit, according to the study.

See OSHA Requirements – Guidlines can be found at the link below:

https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=12716

The study was published online in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 12-2016

 

 

 

“New NIOSH Smart Phone App Addresses Ladder Safety”

Contact: Christina Spring (202) 245-0633

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) announces the availability of a new Ladder Safety smart phone application (app). This new app uses visual and audio signals to make it easier for workers using extension ladders to check the angle the ladder is positioned at, as well as access useful tips for using extension ladders safely. The app is available for free download for both iPhone and Android devices.

Falls from ladders are a common source of preventable construction injuries. Misjudging the ladder angle is a significant risk factor for a fall. If the ladder is set too steep it is more likely to fall back or away during use, and if it is set too shallow then the bottom can slide out.

“The ladder safety app is an innovative way to help keep workers safe and a tool to reduce these preventable injuries,” said NIOSH Director John Howard, M.D. “The development of this smart phone app also demonstrates how we are constantly working to make science-based practical information accessible to workers and employers in a way they need and can easily use.”

The app provides feedback to the user on positioning the extension ladder at the optimal angle. It also provides references and a safety guide for extension ladder selection, inspection, accessorizing, and use. It was developed with input from the ANSI A14 committee on Ladder Safety, the American Ladder Institute, and other stakeholders.

NIOSH collaborated with DSFederal on the final development and testing of the app before release. The app is based on a multimodal inclination indicator for ladder positioning that has been recently awarded a US patent. To learn more and download the Ladder Safety app visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/falls/ and to learn about the campaign to prevent falls in construction go to http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/construction/stopfalls.html.

NIOSH is the federal agency that conducts research and makes recommendations for preventing work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths. For more information about our work visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/.

  

“OSHA’s Proposed New Beryllium Rule Remains in Limbo”

In a new article from the International Business Times says the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has spent 8 months reviewing a proposal to strengthen rules on beryllium exposure, overshooting its deadline by more than 5 months. It is the latest delay in regulations that have been more than 13 years in the making.

As many as 134,000 workers in the U.S. are currently exposed to beryllium – mostly in the aerospace, ceramics, construction and electronics industries, according to research by NIOSH. When the metal is ground into dust and inhaled, it can cause chronic beryllium disease, a potentially fatal lung disorder. Some people are more sensitive to beryllium than others. As it stands, OSHA’s existing beryllium exposure limit of 2.0 micrograms per cubic meter dates from research conducted in the 1940s.

Keith Wrightson, a workplace-safety expert at Public Citizen, a consumer-advocacy group pushing for an updated regulation, says his group wants the exposure limit lowered to 0.1 micrograms per cubic meter. Since the 1970s, NIOSH has backed a limit of 0.5 micrograms per cubic meter.

Once OMB finishes its review, OSHA has to issue a notice of proposed rulemaking and solicit public comments before issuing a final rule, which could take another year. The delay stems from the agency’s compliance with the Small Business Regulatory Flexibility Act, applicable only to OSHA, EPA and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau – which requires that the agencies undergo a special consultation process with business representatives before issuing new rules.

“New NIOSH Smart Phone App Addresses Ladder Safety”

Contact: Christina Spring (202) 245-0633

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) announces the availability of a new Ladder Safety smart phone application (app). This new app uses visual and audio signals to make it easier for workers using extension ladders to check the angle the ladder is positioned at, as well as access useful tips for using extension ladders safely. The app is available for free download for both iPhone and Android devices.

Falls from ladders are a common source of preventable construction injuries. Misjudging the ladder angle is a significant risk factor for a fall. If the ladder is set too steep it is more likely to fall back or away during use, and if it is set too shallow then the bottom can slide out.

“The ladder safety app is an innovative way to help keep workers safe and a tool to reduce these preventable injuries,” said NIOSH Director John Howard, M.D. “The development of this smart phone app also demonstrates how we are constantly working to make science-based practical information accessible to workers and employers in a way they need and can easily use.”

The app provides feedback to the user on positioning the extension ladder at the optimal angle. It also provides references and a safety guide for extension ladder selection, inspection, accessorizing, and use. It was developed with input from the ANSI A14 committee on Ladder Safety, the American Ladder Institute, and other stakeholders.

NIOSH collaborated with DSFederal on the final development and testing of the app before release. The app is based on a multimodal inclination indicator for ladder positioning that has been recently awarded a US patent. To learn more and download the Ladder Safety app visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/falls/ and to learn about the campaign to prevent falls in construction go to http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/construction/stopfalls.html.

NIOSH is the federal agency that conducts research and makes recommendations for preventing work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths. For more information about our work visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/.

  

Preventing Workplace Violence – Tips & Information

Risk Factors

The following references provide information on risk factors and scope of violence in the workplace and may help increase awareness of workplace violence:

Federal Agency Guidance

  • Workplace Violence, 1993-2009 [624 KB PDF, 18 pages]. US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, (2011, March 29). Presents data from 1993 through 2009 from the National Crime Victimization Survey estimating the extent of workplace violence in the United States.
  • Fatal occupational injuries by event or exposure and major private industry sector [460 KB PDF, 23 pages]. US Department of Labor (DOL), Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), (2010). Includes the category “Assaults and Violent Acts”.
  • Workplace Violence Prevention Strategies and Research Needs. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2006-144, (2006, September). Summarizes discussions that took place during Partnering in Workplace Violence Prevention: Translating Research to Practice, a landmark conference held in Baltimore, Maryland, on November 15-17, 2004.
  • Violence in the Workplace – Preventing It; Managing It. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), (2004, March 1). Shares expertise of representatives from law enforcement, private industry, government, law, labor, professional organizations, victim services, the military, academia, mental health as well as the FBI on this important issue. This monograph resulted from a June 2002 symposium hosted by the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime entitled “Violence in the Workplace.”
  • Violence on the Job. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2004-100d, (2004). Discusses practical measures for identifying risk factors for violence at work, and taking strategic action to keep employees safe. Based on extensive NIOSH research, supplemented with information from other authoritative sources.
  • Violence Occupational Hazards in Hospitals. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2002-101, (2002, April). Also available as a 105 KB PDF, 15 pages. Increases employee and employer awareness of the risk factors for violence in hospitals and provides strategies for reducing exposure to these factors.
  • Workplace Violence: Issues in Response [6 MB PDF, 80 pages]. US Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, (2002). Developed from the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime’s “Violence in the Workplace” symposium June 10-14, 2002 as a guide to businesses, small and large, and government in implementing a proactive workplace violence prevention strategy.
  • Sygnatur, Eric F. and Guy A. Toscano. “Work-related Homicides: The Facts” [76 KB PDF, 6 pages]. US Department of Labor (DOL), Bureau of Labor Statistics Office of Safety, Health and Working Conditions Compensation and Working Conditions Article, (2000, Spring). Provides information on work-related homicides, including information about the perpetrators, demographics of the decedents, and other relevant facts about these events, such as the time of the incident, the location, and the type of establishment in which the homicide occurred. Contrary to popular belief, the majority of these incidents are not crimes of passion committed by disgruntled coworkers and spouses, but rather result from robberies.
  • Stress… at Work. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-101, (1999). Highlights knowledge about the causes of stress at work and outlines steps that can be taken to prevent job stress. Defines job stress as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. Job stress can lead to poor health and even injury. Explores a combination of organizational change and stress management as the most useful approach for preventing stress at work.
  • Handbook on Workplace Violence Prevention and Response [874 KB PDF, 15 pages]. US Department of Agriculture, (2001, October). Addresses prevention of workplace violence, employers’ and employees’ responsibilities, identification of potentially violent situations and response to violent incidents.
  • Violence in the Workplace – Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Current Intelligence Bulletin 57, (1996, July). Reviews what is known about fatal and nonfatal violence in the workplace to determine the focus needed for prevention and research efforts. Reports that each week in the United States, an average of 20 workers are murdered and 18,000 are assaulted while at work. These staggering figures should not be an accepted cost of doing business in our society—nor should death or injury be an inevitable result of one’s chosen occupation.
  • Preventing Homicide in the Workplace. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 93-109, (1995, May). Reports workplaces with the highest rates of occupational homicide were taxicab establishments, liquor stores, gas stations, detective/protective services, justice/public order establishments (including courts, police protection establishments, legal counsel and prosecution establishments, correctional institutions, and fire protection establishments), grocery stores, jewelry stores, hotels/motels, and eating/drinking places. Taxicab establishments had the highest rate of occupational homicide–nearly 40 times the national average and more than three times the rate of liquor stores, which had the next highest rate.
  • Occupational Violence. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Workplace Safety and Health Topic. Reports that an average of 1.7 million people were victims of violent crime while working or on duty in the United States each year from 1993 through 1999 according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). Includes NIOSH publications as well as other US government occupational violence links including a psychological first aid manual for mental health providers.

State and Local Guidance

  • Maine’s Caregivers, Social Assistance and Disability Rehabilitation Workers Injured by Violence and Aggression in the Workplace in 2011 [439 KB PDF, 18 pages]. Maine Department of Labor, (2012, July). This document is a report which contains statistical information regarding provider injuries from violent/aggressive actions of recipients of care/services.
  • Workplace Violence: A Report to the Nation [331 KB PDF, 16 pages]. University of Iowa (UI) Injury Prevention Research Center, (2001, February). Summarizes the problem of workplace violence and the recommendations identified by participants at the Workplace Violence Intervention Research Workshop in Washington, DC, April, 2000.
  • Cal/OSHA Guidelines for Workplace Security. State of California, (1995, March 30). Characterizes establishments, profiles and motives of the agent or assailant, and identifies preventive measures by type. In California, the majority (60 percent) of workplace homicides involved a person entering a small late-night retail establishment. Nonfatal Type II events involving assaults to service providers, especially to health care providers, may represent the most prevalent category of workplace violence resulting in physical injury.
  • Violence in the Workplace: Accepted Disabling Claims due to Assaults and Violent Acts, Oregon, 2001-2005 [908 KB PDF, 26 pages]. Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, (2006, December). Provides a study of Workers’ Compensation Claims Caused by Violent Acts, 2001 to 2005.
  • Most Workplace Violence on Women Hidden, Says Center Report. University of Albany (UA), Center for Women in Government. Summarizes and comments on a report addressing workplace violence, emphasizing data specific to women. Two-thirds of the nonfatal attacks on women are committed by patients or residents in institutional settings. Husbands, boyfriends and ex-partners commit 15 percent of all workplace homicides against women. Women are more likely to suffer serious injury from workplace violence than men. Women who are victims of violent workplace crimes are twice as likely as men to know their attackers.

Training & Other Resources

Training

  • Workplace Violence. OSHA. Contains links to a variety of training and reference materials, including presentations, publications, and handouts.
  • Developing a Violence Prevention Program. Oregon OSHA Online Course 120. Provides recommendations for quickly assessing the state of an organization’s current policies and practices and on steps to consider in developing a Workplace Violence Prevention Program (WVPP) to reduce the hazards of workplace violence.
  • Training. University of Minnesota (UM), Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse. Provides training resources specific to workplace violence, including US Office of Personnel Management guide, the OSHA guidelines, and a prevention guide from the State of Mississippi.

Additional Information

  • Tri-national Conference on Violence as a Workplace Risk. US Department of Labor (DOL), North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC), (2001, November 29-30). Raises awareness of the issue of psychological and physical violence in North American workplaces, and provides practical solutions by sharing information, highlighting best practices, and identifying successful methods of prevention.
  • Institutionalized Violence: When Does Care Giving become Submission to Violence? Work-related Risks for Health Care Providers (A) [227 KB PDF, 36 pages]. University of Minnesota (UM), Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, Center on Women and Public Policy. Allows for discussion of sexual harassment as an occupational health and safety issue and supports exploration of employer liability for harassment committed by developmentally disabled adults in care. Includes an abstract, case study, epilogue and teaching notes.

Prevention Programs

The following references provide guidance for evaluating and controlling violence in the workplace.

OSHA Guidance

Other Federal Agency Guidance

  • Home Healthcare Workers: How to Prevent Violence on the Job [517 KB PDF, 2 pages]. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2012–118, (2012, February).
  • Workplace Violence Prevention Strategies and Research Needs. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2006-144, (2006, September).
  • Violence on the Job. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2004-100d, (2004). Discusses practical measures for identifying risk factors for violence at work, and taking strategic action to keep employees safe. Based on extensive NIOSH research, supplemented with information from other authoritative sources.
  • Grassroots Worker Protection. Occupational Safety and Health State Plan Association (OSHSPA), (1999). Describes how state programs help to ensure safe and healthful workplaces.
  • Stress… at Work. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-101, (1999). Highlights knowledge about the causes of stress at work and outlines steps that can be taken to prevent job stress.
  • Preventing Homicide in the Workplace. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 93-109, (1995, May). Helps employers and employees to identify high-risk occupations and workplaces, informs employers and employees about their risks, encourages employers and employees to evaluate risk factors in their workplaces and implement protective measures, and encourages researchers to gather more detailed information about occupational homicide and to develop and evaluate protective measures.
  • Occupational Violence. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Workplace Safety and Health Topic. Provides basic information on workplace violence including risk factors and prevention strategies.
  • New Directions from the Field: Victims’ Rights and Services for the 21st Century, Business Community. US Department of Justice (DOJ), Chapter 12 of the New Directions report on crime victims, (1998, August). Also available as a 145 KB PDF, 12 pages. Deals with victims rights and services in the business environment, and contains a section on workplace violence and provides practical advice for the business community on assisting the victims of workplace violence.
  • Dealing with Workplace Violence: A Guide for Agency Planners. US Office of Personnel Management (OPM). Also available as a 2 MB PDF, 156 pages. Assists those who are responsible for establishing workplace violence initiatives at their agencies. This handbook is the result of a cooperative effort of many federal agencies sharing their expertise in preventing and dealing with workplace violence.

State and Local Guidance

  • Workplace Violence Prevention. Minnesota Department of Labor & Industry. Provides links to prevention resources including workplace violence videos, links to other organizations and training resources:
    • A Comprehensive Guide for Employers and Employees [100 KB PDF, 29 pages]. Provides guidance to develop and implement a workplace violence prevention program. Includes model policy, sample forms, threat and assault log, five warning signs of escalating behavior, sample workplace weapons policy, sample policy about domestic violence in the workplace and personal conduct to minimize violence.
  • Violence Prevention Brochure: Maintaining a Safe Workplace. University of California – Davis (UC Davis). Presents information designed to highlight stresses and risks in the work environment, to enhance workplace safety, and to reduce and prevent disruption and violence.
  • MINCAVA Electronic Clearinghouse – Workplace Violence. Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse (MINCAVA), University of Minnesota (UM). Provides resources identified by the Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse specific to workplace violence.

Enforcement Procedures for Investigating or Inspecting Workplace Violence Incidents. OSHA Directive CPL 02-01-052, (2011, September 8).

“N95 Day” – 9/5/2014 – National Awareness Day Highlights Importance of Respirators

m3-8210N95__14889_zoomOn September 5 th the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) will celebrate “N95 Day,” a national health awareness day focused on increasing workers’ knowledge of on-the-job respiratory safety and protection. NIOSH estimates that every day over 20 million workers, in dozens of industries, are exposed to airborne health risks. The theme for the 2014 observance is “Respirator Preparedness: Where Technology Meets Good Practices.”

N95 awareness day activities include: a live webinar with NIOSH professionals discussing respirator preparedness in the healthcare setting, an online blog, Pinterest-ready infographics, tweets throughout the day (#N95Day), as well as a twitter chat with NIOSH N95 respirator experts. The twitter chat (#N95Chat) will touch upon various industries as the panel of experts discusses best practices for using this type of respiratory protection while taking questions from participants.

“It is vitally important that employers and workers know about the products they are using and understand how to use them properly for their workplace,” explains Maryann D’Alessandro, Director of the NIOSH National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory.  “N95 Day allows us to place even greater emphasis on making sure that accurate and actionable information is available for employers and workers alike.”

The N95 respirator is the most common of the seven types of particulate filtering facepiece respirators. This product filters at least 95% of airborne particles. NIOSH recommends workers who may be exposed to hazardous airborne particles to follow the OSHA respiratory protection standard and use N95 filtering facepiece respirators. Respirators should only be used when engineering control systems are not feasible. Engineering control systems, such as adequate ventilation or scrubbing of contaminants are the preferred control methods for reducing worker exposures.

For more information about N95 Day, visit or search the twitter #N95Day. Workers can also find helpful tools and information on the Respirator Trusted Information Page at knowits.niosh.govExternal Web Site Icon .

NIOSH is the federal agency that conducts research and makes recommendations for preventing work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths. For more information about NIOSH visit  http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ .

 

Health Care Workers Lack Hazardous Chemicals Training According To NIOSH

Stock Photo by Sean Locke www.digitalplanetdesign.com

“Safeguarding health care workers from potential occupational hazards is an essential part of providing good jobs for these dedicated men and women, and furthering high-quality patient care,” NIOSH Director Dr. John Howard said.

  • Health care workers who routinely come in contact with hazardous chemicals lack training and awareness of employer procedures to adequately protect themselves from exposure, according to a new NIOSH study.
  • The survey of more than 12,000 health care workers found that workers administering aerosolized antibiotics were the least likely to have received training on their safe use, followed closely by those exposed to surgical smoke.
  • The study is the first in a series of reports describing current practices used by health care workers to minimize chemical exposures as well as barriers to using recommended personal protective equipment.

Health care workers who routinely come in contact with hazardous chemicals lack training and awareness of employer procedures to adequately protect themselves from exposure, according to a new NIOSH study.

The survey of more than 12,000 health care workers found that workers administering aerosolized antibiotics were the least likely to have received training on their safe use, followed closely by those exposed to surgical smoke.

Conducted in 2011, the Web-based survey is the largest federally sponsored study of health care workers that addresses safety and health practices and use of hazardous chemicals, according to NIOSH. The study results are published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine.

“Safeguarding health care workers from potential occupational hazards is an essential part of providing good jobs for these dedicated men and women, and furthering high-quality patient care,” NIOSH Director Dr. John Howard said. “The limited information available on safe-handling practices associated with use of hazardous chemicals makes our work even more important.”

The study is the first in a series of reports describing current practices used by health care workers to minimize chemical exposures as well as barriers to using recommended personal protective equipment. The chemical agents under study included antineoplastic agents, high-level disinfectants, aerosolized medications, anesthetic gases, surgical smoke and chemical sterilants.

Among the highlights, the study found that:

  • Workers administering aerosolized antibiotics were the least likely to have received training on their safe use (48 percent reported they were never trained), followed closely by those exposed to surgical smoke.
  • Workers most likely to have received training were those who administered antineoplastic drugs (95 percent) and those who used hydrogen peroxide gas plasma as a chemical sterilant (92 percent).
  • For those exposed to surgical smoke, 40 percent did not know if their employers had safe-handling procedures. For those exposed to anesthetic gases, 25 percent did not know.
  • Those who administered antineoplastic drugs were least likely to report that they did not know whether their employer had procedures for minimizing employees’ exposure (3 percent).
  • Chemical-specific training and awareness of employer safe-handling procedures varied by employer work setting (ambulatory health care services versus hospital).

NIOSH said the survey’s findings will help the agency and other health care stakeholders better understand current health and safety practices related to working with hazardous chemical agents; identify gaps in current knowledge about those practices; and design further research in collaboration with partners for addressing those gaps.

 

%d bloggers like this: