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“Top 10 OSHA Citations of 2016: A Starting Point for Workplace Safety”

OSHAupdate

Every October, the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a preliminary list of the 10 most frequently cited safety and health violations for the 2016 fiscal year, compiled from nearly 32,000 inspections of workplaces by federal OSHA staff.

One remarkable thing about the list is that it rarely changes. Year after year, our inspectors see thousands of the same on-the-job hazards, any one of which could result in a fatality or severe injury.

More than 4,500 workers are killed on the job every year, and approximately 3 million are injured, despite the fact that by law, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their workers. If all employers simply corrected the top 10 hazards, we are confident the number of deaths, amputations and hospitalizations would drastically decline.

Consider this 2016 list a starting point for workplace safety:

  1. Fall protection
  2. Hazard communication
  3. Scaffolds
  4. Respiratory protection
  5. Lockout/tagout
  6. Powered industrial trucks
  7. Ladders
  8. Machine guarding
  9. Electrical wiring
  10. Electrical, general requirements

It’s no coincidence that falls are among the leading causes of worker deaths, particularly in construction, and our top 10 list features lack of fall protection as well as ladder and scaffold safety issues. We know how to protect workers from falls, and have an ongoing campaign to inform employers and workers about these measures. Employers must take these issues seriously.

We also see far too many workers killed or gruesomely injured when machinery starts up suddenly while being repaired, or hands and fingers are exposed to moving parts. Lockout/tagout and machine guarding violations are often the culprit here. Proper lockout/tagout procedures ensure that machines are powered off and can’t be turned on while someone is working on them. And installing guards to keep hands, feet and other appendages away from moving machinery prevents amputations and worse.

Respiratory protection is essential for preventing long term and sometimes fatal health problems associated with breathing in asbestos, silica or a host of other toxic substances. But we can see from our list of violations that not nearly enough employers are providing this needed protection and training.

The high number of fatalities associated with forklifts, and high number of violations for powered industrial trucksafety, tell us that many workers are not being properly trained to safely drive these kinds of potentially hazardous equipment.

Rounding out the top 10 list are violations related to electrical safety, an area where the dangers are well-known.

Our list of top violations is far from comprehensive. OSHA regulations cover a wide range of hazards, all of which imperil worker health and safety. And we urge employers to go beyond the minimal requirements to create a culture of safety at work, which has been shown to reduce costs, raise productivity and improve morale. To help them, we have released new recommendations for creating a safety and health program at their workplaces.

We have many additional resources, including a wealth of information on our website and our free and confidential On-site Consultation Program. But tackling the most common hazards is a good place to start saving workers’ lives and limbs.

Thomas Galassi is the director of enforcement programs for OSHA.

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“Top 10 OSHA Citations of 2016: A Starting Point for Workplace Safety”

OSHAupdate

Every October, the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a preliminary list of the 10 most frequently cited safety and health violations for the 2016 fiscal year, compiled from nearly 32,000 inspections of workplaces by federal OSHA staff.

One remarkable thing about the list is that it rarely changes. Year after year, our inspectors see thousands of the same on-the-job hazards, any one of which could result in a fatality or severe injury.

More than 4,500 workers are killed on the job every year, and approximately 3 million are injured, despite the fact that by law, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their workers. If all employers simply corrected the top 10 hazards, we are confident the number of deaths, amputations and hospitalizations would drastically decline.

Consider this 2016 list a starting point for workplace safety:

  1. Fall protection
  2. Hazard communication
  3. Scaffolds
  4. Respiratory protection
  5. Lockout/tagout
  6. Powered industrial trucks
  7. Ladders
  8. Machine guarding
  9. Electrical wiring
  10. Electrical, general requirements

It’s no coincidence that falls are among the leading causes of worker deaths, particularly in construction, and our top 10 list features lack of fall protection as well as ladder and scaffold safety issues. We know how to protect workers from falls, and have an ongoing campaign to inform employers and workers about these measures. Employers must take these issues seriously.

We also see far too many workers killed or gruesomely injured when machinery starts up suddenly while being repaired, or hands and fingers are exposed to moving parts. Lockout/tagout and machine guarding violations are often the culprit here. Proper lockout/tagout procedures ensure that machines are powered off and can’t be turned on while someone is working on them. And installing guards to keep hands, feet and other appendages away from moving machinery prevents amputations and worse.

Respiratory protection is essential for preventing long term and sometimes fatal health problems associated with breathing in asbestos, silica or a host of other toxic substances. But we can see from our list of violations that not nearly enough employers are providing this needed protection and training.

The high number of fatalities associated with forklifts, and high number of violations for powered industrial trucksafety, tell us that many workers are not being properly trained to safely drive these kinds of potentially hazardous equipment.

Rounding out the top 10 list are violations related to electrical safety, an area where the dangers are well-known.

Our list of top violations is far from comprehensive. OSHA regulations cover a wide range of hazards, all of which imperil worker health and safety. And we urge employers to go beyond the minimal requirements to create a culture of safety at work, which has been shown to reduce costs, raise productivity and improve morale. To help them, we have released new recommendations for creating a safety and health program at their workplaces.

We have many additional resources, including a wealth of information on our website and our free and confidential On-site Consultation Program. But tackling the most common hazards is a good place to start saving workers’ lives and limbs.

Thomas Galassi is the director of enforcement programs for OSHA.

“Safety Photo of the Day” – “Ladder Safety”

Ladder safety

Basic Ladder Safety

Ladders are tools.  Many of the basic safety rules that apply to most tools also apply to the safe use of a ladder:

  • If you feel tired or dizzy, or are prone to losing your balance, stay off the ladder.
  • Do not use ladders in high winds or storms.
  • Wear clean slip-resistant shoes.  Shoes with leather soles are not appropriate for ladder use since they are not considered sufficiently slip resistant.
  • Before using a ladder,inspect it to confirm it is in good working condition.
    • Ladders with loose or missing parts must be rejected. Rickety ladders that sway or lean to the side must be rejected.
  • The ladder you select must be the right size for the job.
    • The Duty Rating of the ladder must be greater than the total weight of the climber,tools,supplies,and other objects placed upon the ladder. The length of the ladder must be sufficient so that the climber does not have to stand on the top rung or step.
  • When the ladder is set-up for use, it must be placed on firm level ground and without any type of slippery condition present at either the base or top support points.
  • Only one person at a time is permitted on a ladder unless the ladder is specifically designed for more than one climber (such as a Trestle Ladder).
  • Ladders must not be placed in front of closed doors that can open toward the ladder. The door must be blocked open, locked, or guarded.
  • Read the safety information labels on the ladder.
    • The on-product safety information is specific to the particular type of ladder on which it appears. The climber is not considered qualified or adequately trained to use the ladder until familiar with this information.

The Three Point-of-Contact ClimbFactors contributing to falls from ladders include haste, sudden movement, lack of attention, the condition of the ladder (worn or damaged), the user’s age or physical condition, or both, and the user’s footwear.

  • Although the user’s weight or size typically does not increase the likelihood of a fall, improper climbing posture creates user clumsiness and may cause falls. Reduce your chances of falling during the climb by:
  • wearing slip-resistant shoes with heavy soles to prevent foot fatigue;
  • cleaning the soles of shoes to maximize traction;
  • using towlines, a tool belt or an assistant to convey materials so that the climbers hands are free when climbing;
  • climbing slowly and deliberately while avoiding sudden movements;
  • never attempting to move a ladder while standing on it;
  • keeping the center of your belt buckle (stomach) between the ladder side rails when climbing and while working.  Do not overreach or lean while working so that you don’t fall off the ladder sideways or pull the ladder over sideways while standing on it.

When climbing a ladder, it is safest to utilize Three Points-of-Contact because it minimizes the chances of slipping and falling from the ladder.  At all times during ascent, descent, and working, the climber must face the ladder and have two hands and one foot, or two feet and one hand in contact with the ladder steps, rungs and/or side rails.  In this way, the climber is not likely to become unstable in the event one limb slips during the climb.  It is important to note that the climber must not carry any objects in either hand that can interfere with a firm grip on the ladder. Otherwise, Three Points-of-Contact with the ladder cannot be adequately maintained and the chance of falling is increased in the event a hand or foot slip occurs.

OSHA Ladder Safety Documents

Agriculture: Protecting Workers from Tripod Orchard Ladder Injuries QuickCard
(OSHA 3705 – 2014) (English: PDF )

(OSHA 3705 – 2014) (Spanish: PDF )Agriculture: Safe Use of Tripod Orchard Ladders Fact Sheet

(OSHA FS-3728– 2014) (English: PDF)Ladder Safety: Reducing Falls in Construction: Safe Use of Extension Ladders Fact Sheet

(OSHA FS-3660 – 2013) (English: PDF)Ladder Safety: Reducing Falls in Construction: Safe Use of Job-made Wooden Ladders Fact Sheet(OSHA FS-3661 – 2013) (English: HTMLPDF)

Ladder Safety: Reducing Falls in Construction: Safe Use of Stepladders Fact Sheet
(OSHA FS-3662 – 2013) (English: PDF)

“OSHA Announces Top 10 Violations For Fiscal Year 2014”

OSHA Top 10 Cited in 2014

Speaking at the 2014 National Safety Council Congress and Expo, Patrick Kapust, deputy director of OSHA’s Directorate of Enforcement Programs, shared preliminary numbers for the top 10 most frequently cited OSHA standards in fiscal year (FY) 2014. Keep reading to find out what made the cut this year and how you can avoid these common hazards in your facility.

While some items on the list shifted position within the top ten, all of the standards on this year’s list made an appearance last year. Notably, the top four violations—fall protection in construction, hazard communication, scaffolding in construction, and respiratory protection—appeared in exactly the same order in FY 2013 and FY 2012.

While the ranking of the top ten violations remains relatively static compared to previous years, the total number of violations cited is somewhat lower than the FY 2013 figure. This is partially due to the 3-week government shutdown in October 2013, during which OSHA lost the opportunity to conduct between 1,400 and 1,500 inspections. However, Kapust emphasized that OSHA is working to make up for the lost time, and the numbers are preliminary.

The top 10 most frequently cited standards for FY 2014 are as follows:

  1. Fall protection in construction (29 CFR 1926.501): 6,143 violations. Lack of fall protection has been a leading offender for several years. Common mistakes under this standard include failing to provide fall protection to employees working at heights, unprotected sides and edges, failing to use fall protection equipment correctly, and failing to provide protection from falling objects. In many cases, a fall protection program is completely nonexistent. Roofing and framing contractors, as well as single-family residential construction employers, are frequent violators of the fall protection standard.
  2. Hazard communication (29 CFR 1910.1200): 5,161 violations. Common hazard communication mistakes include failing to have a written program, failing to have safety data sheets (SDSs) for each chemical in the workplace, labeling mistakes, lack of employee training, and failing to provide employees with information on the hazards of the chemicals in the workplace. Significantly, Kapust commented that the 2012 changes to the hazard communication standard did not correspond to a significant number of violations; rather, most HazCom violations deal with much more basic mistakes that would also have been violations under the previous version of the standard.
  3. Scaffolding in construction (29 CFR 1926.451: 4,029 violations. Citations under the construction industry scaffolding standard often stem from scaffolds that are not fully planked, a lack of portable or hook ladders to access scaffold platforms, loading scaffolds in excess of their capacity, and failing to protect employees from fall hazards on scaffolds.
  4. Respiratory protection (29 CFR 1910.134): 3,223 violations. Lack of a written program is the most commonly cited part of the respiratory protection standard. Other common mistakes include not performing a medical evaluation on employees who must wear respirators, failing to select and provide a respirator appropriate for the activity, failing to conduct fit testing, and failing to train employees.
  5. Lockout/tagout (29 CFR 1910.147): 2,704 violations. Many citations are issues under the lockout/tagout standard for the complete lack of a hazardous energy control program. Other common mistakes include failing to apply locks and tags as necessary and failing to remove unauthorized employees from the area during equipment service and maintenance. Notably, Kapust mentioned that lack of training was not one of the most frequently cited parts of the standard, which he attributed to the fact that employers who fail to provide training often lack a lockout/tagout program altogether and thus would be cited for that instead.
  6. Powered industrial trucks (29 CFR 1910.178): 2,662 violations. Lack of operator training is the most common pitfall under this standard. Other common mistakes include forklifts that are not in safe operating condition and modifications and additions that are not approved by the forklift manufacturer. Industries that frequently violate this standard include warehousing and storage and machine shops.
  7. Electrical, wiring methods (29 CFR 1910.305): 2,490 violations. Citations under this standard often occur when flexible cords are used in place of fixed wiring, conductors enter boxes unprotected, employees are exposed to live contacts, and circuit boxes are not designed to prevent moisture from entering.
  8. Ladders in construction (29 CFR 1926.1053): 2,448 violations. Common ladder hazards include using a ladder not designed for the load it is carrying, using extension ladders that do not provide enough overhang at the top to ensure stability, and using an inappropriate type of ladder for the job.
  9. Machine guarding (29 CFR 1910.212): 2,200 violations. To prevent machine guarding violations, employers should make sure to guard point of operation hazards, ingoing nip points, blades, rotating parts, and any other part of the machinery that may pose a hazard. Make sure that guards remain in place and are not removed by employees.
  10. Electrical, general requirements (29 CFR 1910.303): 2,056 violations. To prevent these citations, employers should ensure that qualified and unqualified workers are appropriately trained for their job tasks to avoid electric shock and electrocution.

Source: BLR® See original post here:

http://safety.blr.com/workplace-safety-news/safety-administration/OSHA-and-state-safety-compliance-enforcement/OSHA-announces-top-10-violations-for-FY-2014/

New! – “OSHA’s Hazard Identification Training Tool”

OSHA's Hazard Identification Training Tool 2014-06-12 13-02-58

OSHA’s Hazard Identification Training Tool is an interactive, online, game-based training tool for small business owners, workers and others interested in learning the core concepts of hazard identification. After using this tool, users will better understand the process to identify hazards in their own workplace.

This tool is intended to:

(1) Teach small business owners and their workers the process for finding hazards in their workplace,
(2) Raise awareness on the types of information and resources about workplace hazards available on OSHA’s website.

Important: This is a learning tool. The items presented in this tool are for training purposes only and the visual representations are conceptual and do not always show specific control for hazards. OSHA inspections and possible citations and penalties for violation of OSHA regulations are NOT part of this tool. Employers and workers must consult the applicable OSHA standards for the specific requirements applicable to their workplaces when developing and implementing their own hazard identification program.

How to Play

Currently, the user can choose between three different scenarios: “OSHA Visual Inspection Training”, “Manufacturing Facility” and “Construction”. To view specific workplace operations, OSHA recommends playing the “OSHA Visual Inspection Training” scenario first. This scenario focuses on the visual inspection component to identify specific hazards as opposed to the larger hazard identification process.

Note: The hazards in each of these scenarios are randomized so a user can play each scenario multiple times with different hazard combinations appearing.

OSHA Visual Inspection Training

In the “OSHA Visual Inspection Training” scenario, which contains a saw, industrial chemical mixer, scaffolding and fall protection for inspection; users learn how to identify hazards on items found in the workplace; become familiar with typical hazard categories; and understand common relationships of hazards to equipment components and operations.

OSHA Visual Inspection Training Game Play: The OSHA Visual Inspection Training offers the user an opportunity to practice a visual inspection and find hazards. In this scenario, the user can view equipment from 360° to look for hazards. The user can also talk to the employee and observe the employee at work to identify additional hazards. Once hazards are identified, the user checks the box in the log.

Note: This is an important training and compliance tool for “small businesses” with a small employee base to understand and obtain training  about what type and how OSHA rules will affect you and your business.

“Shake Hands With Danger” – “Caterpillar Construction Safety Video – 1970”

Construction Industry 2014-04-18 11-22-17

 

HIGHLIGHTS

What's New What’s New

New OSHA schedules informal hearing on proposed extension of crane operator certification deadline. OSHA News Release [4/15/2014]

New OSHA announces national stand-down for fall prevention in construction [3/19/14]

New No more falling workers: OSHA focuses on protecting cell tower employees after increase in worksite fatalities. OSHA News Release, (2014 Feb. 11)

New OSHA letter to communication tower industry employers

New Fall from a Telecommunications Tower: FATAL Facts (PDF*)

Protecting the Safety and Health of Communication Tower Workers*. (2013, November 8).

Construction Industry Digest

Related Topics Related Topics

New Scaffolding: Narrow Frame Scaffolds Fact Sheet (PDF*). (OSHA 3722 – 2014).

New Material Hoist Collapse (PDF*). OSHA FATAL Facts No. 8, (2014).

New Hazard Alert: Using Dolly-Type Devices to Spread Flammable Liquid Adhesives on a Roof Can Cause Fires. SHIB [3/13/14]

Prevention Videos (v-Tools): Construction Hazards. OSHA.

Prevention through Design (PtD). OSHA Alliance Program – Construction Workplace Design Solutions

Trenching and Excavation Safety [English* | Spanish*]. OSHA Fact Sheet, (2011).

New factsheets on minimizing silica exposure in construction [3/1/13]

Ladder Safety Guidance

  • Falling Off Ladders Can Kill: Use Them Safely – Booklet [PDF* | EPUB* | MOBI*]

  • Safe Use of Extension Ladders – Fact Sheet (English) [PDF*]

  • Safe Use of Job-made Wooden Ladders – Fact Sheet (English) [PDF*]

  • Safe Use of Stepladders – Fact Sheet (English) [PDF*]

  • NIOSH Ladder safety phone app – English and Spanish

OSHA’s Fall Prevention Campaign – “Are Your Employees Trained?”

Falls From Floor – Floor

Falls From Bridges

Leading Edge Falls

Re-Roofing Falls

Scaffolding Falls

FALLS ARE THE LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH IN CONSTRUCTION. In 2010, there were 264 fall fatalities (255 falls to lower level) out of 774 total fatalities in construction. These deaths are preventable.

Falls can be prevented and lives can be saved through three simple steps:

This website is part of OSHA‘s nationwide outreach campaign to raise awareness among workers and employers about the hazards of falls from ladders, scaffolds and roofs. The educational resources page gives workers and employers information about falls and how to prevent them. There are also training tools for employers to use and posters to display at their worksites. Many of the new resources target vulnerable workers with limited English proficiency.

We invite you to join in this effort by helping to reach workers and employers in your community with the resources you find on this site. OSHA will continue to add information and tools to this page throughout the year.

OSHA has partnered with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) – Construction Sector on this nationwide outreach campaign to raise awareness among workers and employers about common fall hazards in construction, and how falls from ladders, scaffolds and roofs can be prevented and lives can be saved. Here’s how:

PLAN ahead to get the job done safely
When working from heights, such as ladders, scaffolds, and roofs, employers must plan projects to ensure that the job is done safely. Begin by deciding how the job will be done, what tasks will be involved, and what safety equipment may be needed to complete each task.

When estimating the cost of a job, employers should include safety equipment, and plan to have all the necessary equipment and tools available at the construction site. For example, in a roofing job, think about all of the different fall hazards, such as holes or skylights and leading edges, then plan and select fall protection suitable to that work, such as personal fall arrest systems (PFAS).

PROVIDE the right equipment
Workers who are six feet or more above lower levels are at risk for serious injury or death if they should fall. To protect these workers, employers must provide fall protection and the right equipment for the job, including the right kinds of ladders, scaffolds, and safety gear.

Different ladders and scaffolds are appropriate for different jobs. Always provide workers with the kind they need to get the job done safely. For roof work, there are many ways to prevent falls. If workers use personal fall arrest systems (PFAS), provide a harness for each worker who needs to tie off to the anchor. Make sure the PFAS fits, and regularly inspect all fall protection equipment to ensure it’s still in good condition and safe to use.

TRAIN everyone to use the equipment safely
Falls can be prevented when workers understand proper set-up and safe use of equipment, so they need training on the specific equipment they will use to complete the job. Employers must train workers in hazard recognition and in the care and safe use ladders, scaffolds, fall protection systems, and other equipment they’ll be using on the job.

OSHA has provided numerous materials and resources that employers can use during toolbox talks to train workers on safe practices to avoid falls in construction. Falls from ladders, scaffolds and roofs can be prevented and lives can be saved through three simple steps: Plan, Provide and Train.

Campaign Partners

 

The Dangers of Working at Heights

New data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) show you don’t have to fall very far for the fall to be deadly. In 2011, CFOI began collecting information on the height of fatal falls. In construction, almost half of the fatal falls (48.8 percent) were from 20 feet or less, 14 percent were from ten feet or less and some were even less than six feet. Only 21.8 percent of victims fell from more than 30 feet.

As might be expected, fatal falls from scaffolds and roofs tend to be higher (33 and 39 percent, respectively, were from over 25 feet) while fatal ladder falls tend to be lower (only 12 percent over 25 feet; 27 percent from ten feet or less).

Why are falls, even from six to ten feet so dangerous? The data show that the largest percentage of the fatalities are from head injuries (over 37 percent), most often, probably, from falling backwards off a ladder, roof or scaffold.

Falls are a major problem in construction and, specifically, for Laborers. In 2011, 62 laborers died from falls, about a quarter of all construction workers who fell to their deaths. For more information about fall prevention, go to the national falls campaign website: www.stopconstructionfalls.com.

The Truth About Fall Fatalities and Injuries [Infographic]

OSHA’s Fall Prevention Campaign – “Are Your Employees Trained?”

Falls From Floor – Floor

Falls From Bridges

Leading Edge Falls

Re-Roofing Falls

Scaffolding Falls

FALLS ARE THE LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH IN CONSTRUCTION. In 2010, there were 264 fall fatalities (255 falls to lower level) out of 774 total fatalities in construction. These deaths are preventable.

Falls can be prevented and lives can be saved through three simple steps:

This website is part of OSHA‘s nationwide outreach campaign to raise awareness among workers and employers about the hazards of falls from ladders, scaffolds and roofs. The educational resources page gives workers and employers information about falls and how to prevent them. There are also training tools for employers to use and posters to display at their worksites. Many of the new resources target vulnerable workers with limited English proficiency.

We invite you to join in this effort by helping to reach workers and employers in your community with the resources you find on this site. OSHA will continue to add information and tools to this page throughout the year.

OSHA has partnered with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) – Construction Sector on this nationwide outreach campaign to raise awareness among workers and employers about common fall hazards in construction, and how falls from ladders, scaffolds and roofs can be prevented and lives can be saved. Here’s how:

PLAN ahead to get the job done safely
When working from heights, such as ladders, scaffolds, and roofs, employers must plan projects to ensure that the job is done safely. Begin by deciding how the job will be done, what tasks will be involved, and what safety equipment may be needed to complete each task.

When estimating the cost of a job, employers should include safety equipment, and plan to have all the necessary equipment and tools available at the construction site. For example, in a roofing job, think about all of the different fall hazards, such as holes or skylights and leading edges, then plan and select fall protection suitable to that work, such as personal fall arrest systems (PFAS).

PROVIDE the right equipment
Workers who are six feet or more above lower levels are at risk for serious injury or death if they should fall. To protect these workers, employers must provide fall protection and the right equipment for the job, including the right kinds of ladders, scaffolds, and safety gear.

Different ladders and scaffolds are appropriate for different jobs. Always provide workers with the kind they need to get the job done safely. For roof work, there are many ways to prevent falls. If workers use personal fall arrest systems (PFAS), provide a harness for each worker who needs to tie off to the anchor. Make sure the PFAS fits, and regularly inspect all fall protection equipment to ensure it’s still in good condition and safe to use.

TRAIN everyone to use the equipment safely
Falls can be prevented when workers understand proper set-up and safe use of equipment, so they need training on the specific equipment they will use to complete the job. Employers must train workers in hazard recognition and in the care and safe use ladders, scaffolds, fall protection systems, and other equipment they’ll be using on the job.

OSHA has provided numerous materials and resources that employers can use during toolbox talks to train workers on safe practices to avoid falls in construction. Falls from ladders, scaffolds and roofs can be prevented and lives can be saved through three simple steps: Plan, Provide and Train.

Campaign Partners

 

Safety Photo of the Day! – Why Scaffolding Safety Is Important!

Scaffolding

In 2008, the Bureau of Labor Statistics‘ Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) reported 88 fatalities occurred in the year 2007 from scaffolds, staging. More… [42 KB PDF, 5 pages]. In a Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) study, 72% of workers injured in scaffold accidents attributed the accident either to the planking or support giving way, or to the employee slipping or being struck by a falling object. All of these can be controlled by compliance with OSHA standards. More… [118 KB PDF, 4 pages.] Scaffolding is addressed in specific standards for the general industry, shipyard employment, marine terminals, and longshoring.

OSHA Standards

This section highlights OSHA standards, Regulatory Agenda (a list of actions being taken with regard to OSHA standards), preambles to final rules (background to final rules), and directives (instructions for compliance officers).

Note: Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)

Shipyard Employment (29 CFR 1915)

Marine Terminals (29 CFR 1917)

Longshoring (29 CFR 1918)

Regulatory Agenda

Preambles to Final Rules

Directives

Construction

For information related to construction, see OSHA’s Scaffolding – Construction page.

Hazards and Possible Solutions

The following references aid in recognizing scaffolds and the hazards associated with scaffolding in the workplace.

  • Scaffolding. OSHA eTool. Includes FAQs, glossary, hazards and possible solutions for many types of scaffolding.
    • Suspended Scaffolds. Indicates requirements for two-point (swing stage) scaffolds, as well as single-point adjustable, multi-point adjustable, catenary, interior hung, needle-beam, multi-level, and float (ship) scaffolds.
    • Supported Scaffolds. Indicates requirements for frame scaffolds, as well as mobile, pump jack, ladder jack, tube coupler and pole scaffolds.
  • Shipyard Employment. OSHA eTool. Describes common hazards and possible solutions for tasks performed during the ship repair process.
    • Scaffolds (Staging). Provides general requirements for all scaffolds and also includes information on specific types of scaffolding.
    • Aerial Lifts. Replaces traditional shipyard scaffolding.
  • Key Switch Controlled Elevating and Rotating Aerial Lifts. OSHA Technical Information Bulletin (TIB), (2002, April 11). Also available as a 15 KB PDF, 3 pages. Alerts users that the subject lifts should only be operated when the operational mode switch key is inserted in the switch, unless the key is otherwise readily available and immediately accessible for use; and to provide recommendations for employers that own the subject aerial lifts.
  • Using Aerial Lifts [21 KB PDF*, 1 page]. OSHA Fact Sheet, (2005, October).
  • Keeping Workers Safe During Clean Up and Recovery Operations Following Hurricanes. OSHA, (2005, September). Includes information such as news releases, public service announcements, fact sheets, frequently asked questions, and more.
  • Use of Aerial Lifts. Hurricane eMatrix.
  • Aerial Lifts Safety Tips Quick Card. OSHA Publication 3267, (2005). Also available as a 19 KB PDF, 1 page. Includes a list of safe work practices for aerial lifts.
  • Selected Occupational Fatalities Related to Vehicle-Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms as Found in Reports of OSHA Fatality/Catastrophe Investigations. OSHA, (1991, July). Studies OSHA fatality/catastrophe investigation reports from 1986-1990 and includes summaries of individual reports, as well as analysis of data and recommended preventive measures.
  • Mast Climbers Fundamentals of Safe Use – Ground Conditions Fact Sheet [80 KB PDF*, 1 page]. OSHA and Scaffold Industry Association (SIA) Alliance, (2011, April). Provides information to ensure that the ground under the mast climber is solid and secure and that it remains safe during erection or dismantling of the structure.
  • Mast Climbers Fundamentals of Safe Use – Tying to the Structure Fact Sheet [24 KB PDF*, 1 page]. OSHA and Scaffold Industry Association (SIA) Alliance, (2011, April). Provides information to ensure that the method of tying the unit to the structure is properly planned and executed and that it remains safe during erection or dismantling of the structure.
  • Mast Climbing Work Platform Safety Tips [101 KB PDF* – 101 KB, 1 page]. OSHA and Scaffold Industry Association (SIA) Alliance, (2010, March). Also available as a 58 KB PDF* (Portuguese version) and a 103 KB PDF* (Spanish version). Addresses issues associated with the safe and proper use of Transport Platforms.
  • Transport Platform (TP) Safety Tips [38 KB PDF, 1 page]. OSHA and Scaffold Industry Association (SIA) Alliance, (2009, October). Also available as a 27 KB PDF* (Portuguese version) and a 44 KB PDF* (Spanish version). Addresses issues associated with the use of mast climbing work platforms such as fall hazards and stable erection.
  • Aerial Devices – Vehicle-Mounted Elevating & Rotating Work Platforms [167 KB PDF*(English/Spanish), 2 pages]. OSHA and Altec Alliance, (2008, August). Provides information in English and Spanish to help employers inform their employees about the hazards with working on aerial devices and identifies guidelines for employees to follow.
  • Aerial Equipment – Electrical Hazards [165 KB PDF*(English/Spanish), 2 pages]. OSHA and Altec Alliance, (2008, August). Provides information in English and Spanish to help employers inform their employees about the electrical hazards associated with working on aerial devices and identifies guidelines for employees to follow.
  • Operator Training for Aerial Equipment [160 KB PDF*(English/Spanish), 2 pages]. OSHA and Altec Alliance, (2008, August). Provides information in English and Spanish to help employers identify the training recommended for employees on the inspection and operation of aerial equipment.
  • Protect Yourself: Aerial Devices – Vehicle-Mounted Elevating & Rotating Work Platforms [167 KB PDF*(English/Spanish), 2 pages]. OSHA and Altec Alliance, (2008, January). Provides information to help employers inform their employees about the hazards with working on aerial devices and identifies guidelines for employees to follow.
  • Protect Yourself: Aerial Equipment – Electrical Hazards [165 KB PDF*(English/Spanish), 2 pages]. OSHA and Altec Alliance, (2008, January). Provides information to help employers inform their employees about the electrical hazards associated with working on aerial devices and identifies guidelines for employees to follow.
  • Protect Yourself: Operator Training for Elevating Equipment – General Training Guidance [160 KB PDF*(English/Spanish), 2 pages]. OSHA and Altec Alliance, (2008, January). Provides information to help employers identify the training recommended for employees on the inspection and operation of elevating equipment.

Additional Information

Related Safety and Health Topics Pages

Training

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