Advertisements

“House Fires Caused By Storage of 9 Volt, AA Batteries In Junk Drawers & Other Places Rising”

* If You Know of a Fire Incident in Your Town Caused by 9 Volt, AA or AAA Battery Storage in a Home, Please Note it in the comments Section of this Post! Thank You!

Click here for the recent Hastings, Nebraska House Fire on January 16, 2017

If you are storing loose 9 volt or AA or other batteries in a kitchen drawer or a “junk” drawer in your home, watch how you store them. Above all don’t store them loose and rolling around with other metal items, like small tools, paper clips, nails and more of the lovely mix of things we keep in our junk drawers. You also don’t want them loose and rolling around in other items like a camera case, luggage, etc.

All you need to have happened is for a metal object like steel wool or a paper clip short out across the top of a 9-volt battery and ignite paper or other easily ignited materials and you’ll have a potential disaster in your home. As indicated in the YouTube Video below, it doesn’t take much to heat a metallic object or cause a spark in order to start a fire. *Please Do Not Do This At Home*

What to do with a 9 Volt Battery

I teach safety to the public, common sense tells most of us what to do in situations that could become life threatening. I speak to 50-60 people at a time about fire safety in the home on a monthly basis. I get the same reaction from every group when I hold up a 9-volt battery and announce that it is a fire hazard and it could burn down your house.

They all kinda look at me funny, as if to ask, “Did you just say a 9-volt battery could burn down my house?” That look is almost comical.

Q: Where do you store your batteries?

A: Throw them in  in a “junk” drawer

I then hold up a brillo pad. (just one example)

Q: What do you do with the batteries when you are done with them?

A: Throw them in the trash.

A 9-volt battery (see video) is a fire hazard because the positive and negative posts are on top, right next to one another. If this comes in contact with anything metal (aluminum foil, brillo, etc…) it will spark, and if there is a fuel for this spark you will have a fire. (fire needs heat, fuel and oxygen to burn) To test this theory, put a 9-volt battery or a couple of AA batteries in your pocket with some loose change or your key chain full of keys, (use common sense) this will bring on a whole new meaning to the words, Hot Pants.

When you dispose of this type of battery (positive and negative on top) Make sure it is safely wrapped in electrical tape or something to keep it separated from anything else that may come in contact with it. A small box or zip lock bag if kept in a junk drawer should suffice.  I have seen in some stores now that the manufacturers are now packaging them with plastic caps. If you need to purchase a 9-volt battery try to find those that are packaged in this manner.

Try to be just as diligent with AA or AAA batteries. Keep them in their original packaging if stored in a “junk drawer”. Don’t let them roll around freely with all the other wonderful miscellaneous items we unknowingly toss in the drawer and don’t think twice about it.

 

untitled-design

Advertisements

“CPSC “Fireworks Safety”

If your state allows use of fireworks, please be safe and read what’s at risk if you aren’t careful. Be Safe and have a great Independance Day!
Fireworks-Safety-Inforgraphic-Spanish650X6200

CPSC “Fireworks Safety 2014”

We have an updated version of our Fireworks Injuries infographic. The risks are the same. The only change is in the numbers.

Fireworks-Safety-Inforgraphic-Spanish650X6200

 

 

 

 

Addressing Safety Challenges for Disabled Workers – “How Do You Get Through Your Day?”

Richie Parker, HMS Engineer -“How Do You Get Through Your Day?” – Video Courtesy of Hendrick Motorsports® ESPN®

Employees in today’s workplace face many challenges. Work forces have been cut, and in many cases, workdays have been extended. Older workers are unable to retire, while younger workers are unable to find work. New technology is introduced into the workplace, requiring all to relearn how to perform their jobs. This is difficult for the average worker, but it is extremely difficult if an employee is further hindered by disabilities.

Disabilities of all types affect employees and can pose various mental or physical challenges. In many situations, a disability may impact the amount of time it takes for an employee to complete a task or get from one part of a facility to another. Some disabilities may be known while others remain unknown to an employer. Thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), employees with disabilities can continue to work without fear of losing their jobs1.

All employees with disabilities deserve the right to support their families. If otherwise qualified for a job, a disability should not take away an individual’s opportunity to work. Existing laws protected those discriminated against for race, sex, national origin and color, but the ADA was the first law to speak for those with disabilities in the workplace.

The ADA disallows discrimination against otherwise qualified individuals in an employment setting because of mental or physical disabilities2. This means that in many situations, the employer has to adjust a work environment to allow an employee to function. In 2009, the ADA was amended to include additional information and coverage. This amendment required the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to make changes to their regulations regarding the term “substantially limits” and how it is defined2. It also broadens the definition of “major life activities” to include many new activities.

Workplace Adaptations

As with any law that changes the workplace, some fight or avoid it while others fully embrace and promote it. One major compliance concern deals with accessibility. Because of this, many workplaces have adjusted or created more accessible entrances and exits to their facilities, allowing more independence for persons in wheelchairs. Other subtle changes may include the height of water fountains, width of bathroom stalls, hand rails inside the stalls and long ramps instead of stairs. The path of travel that employees take should never be obstructed; there should be no barriers to prevent someone from getting to safety in an emergency3.

Making accommodations in the workplace is important, yet one must avoid making a spectacle of employees with disabilities. One concept being utilized in workplaces is universal design, which is best defined as designing products and work spaces to allow use by everyone, regardless of disability4. This eliminates many cases of employees standing out or requiring special assistance to be able to complete their tasks. Better designed work spaces can increase function for all employees, regardless of age4. This still is a relatively new idea and few examples exist in the workplace despite multiple studies proving the effectiveness.

The goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate on completing job tasks.

Workstations easily can be adapted to follow this universal design. Many companies now use slide-out keyboard trays and monitors on swinging arms to allow employees to adjust to their needs. Desks can accommodate wheelchairs in place of regular chairs, and general work spaces can be lowered to allow easier access. All workplaces eventually will follow the universal design approach3. The main goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate more on completing their tasks.

The biggest challenge with universal design is accommodating the multitude of challenges that different disabilities present. Not all disabilities are the same, and not all will present the same challenges for employees. Some employees may have issues with their right hand while others have issues with their left. For some, it may involve not being able to stand or sit. Some may need low lighting, while others need bright lighting. Designing a facility to accommodate all is always going to be a challenge.

Some disabilities require a service animal to be able to get around or reach materials. ADA protects those that need such animals. This can create another complication for an employer if other employees are allergic to such animals. The employer must work with all parties involved to find a solution.

Companies using older facilities often have the most trouble complying with guidelines of the ADA. Designing a building from the ground up is much easier than attempting to retrofit existing facilities. Some of the complications with retrofitting facilities include adding adequate doorways. Depending on the design of the structure, adding doorways can be complicated and require an extensive amount of remodeling. Other complications include retrofitting areas with stairs and restrooms with stalls that are too narrow. Moving plumbing may require the existing floor to be torn out and require a lot of time.

Read the remainder of the story here: http://ehstoday.com/safety/addressing-safety-challenges-disabled-workers

Source: EHS Today®

Addressing Safety Challenges for Disabled Workers – “How Do You Get Through Your Day?”

Richie Parker, HMS Engineer -“How Do You Get Through Your Day?” – Video Courtesy of Hendrick Motorsports® ESPN®

Employees in today’s workplace face many challenges. Work forces have been cut, and in many cases, workdays have been extended. Older workers are unable to retire, while younger workers are unable to find work. New technology is introduced into the workplace, requiring all to relearn how to perform their jobs. This is difficult for the average worker, but it is extremely difficult if an employee is further hindered by disabilities.

Disabilities of all types affect employees and can pose various mental or physical challenges. In many situations, a disability may impact the amount of time it takes for an employee to complete a task or get from one part of a facility to another. Some disabilities may be known while others remain unknown to an employer. Thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), employees with disabilities can continue to work without fear of losing their jobs1.

All employees with disabilities deserve the right to support their families. If otherwise qualified for a job, a disability should not take away an individual’s opportunity to work. Existing laws protected those discriminated against for race, sex, national origin and color, but the ADA was the first law to speak for those with disabilities in the workplace.

The ADA disallows discrimination against otherwise qualified individuals in an employment setting because of mental or physical disabilities2. This means that in many situations, the employer has to adjust a work environment to allow an employee to function. In 2009, the ADA was amended to include additional information and coverage. This amendment required the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to make changes to their regulations regarding the term “substantially limits” and how it is defined2. It also broadens the definition of “major life activities” to include many new activities.

Workplace Adaptations

As with any law that changes the workplace, some fight or avoid it while others fully embrace and promote it. One major compliance concern deals with accessibility. Because of this, many workplaces have adjusted or created more accessible entrances and exits to their facilities, allowing more independence for persons in wheelchairs. Other subtle changes may include the height of water fountains, width of bathroom stalls, hand rails inside the stalls and long ramps instead of stairs. The path of travel that employees take should never be obstructed; there should be no barriers to prevent someone from getting to safety in an emergency3.

Making accommodations in the workplace is important, yet one must avoid making a spectacle of employees with disabilities. One concept being utilized in workplaces is universal design, which is best defined as designing products and work spaces to allow use by everyone, regardless of disability4. This eliminates many cases of employees standing out or requiring special assistance to be able to complete their tasks. Better designed work spaces can increase function for all employees, regardless of age4. This still is a relatively new idea and few examples exist in the workplace despite multiple studies proving the effectiveness.

The goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate on completing job tasks.

Workstations easily can be adapted to follow this universal design. Many companies now use slide-out keyboard trays and monitors on swinging arms to allow employees to adjust to their needs. Desks can accommodate wheelchairs in place of regular chairs, and general work spaces can be lowered to allow easier access. All workplaces eventually will follow the universal design approach3. The main goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate more on completing their tasks.

The biggest challenge with universal design is accommodating the multitude of challenges that different disabilities present. Not all disabilities are the same, and not all will present the same challenges for employees. Some employees may have issues with their right hand while others have issues with their left. For some, it may involve not being able to stand or sit. Some may need low lighting, while others need bright lighting. Designing a facility to accommodate all is always going to be a challenge.

Some disabilities require a service animal to be able to get around or reach materials. ADA protects those that need such animals. This can create another complication for an employer if other employees are allergic to such animals. The employer must work with all parties involved to find a solution.

Companies using older facilities often have the most trouble complying with guidelines of the ADA. Designing a building from the ground up is much easier than attempting to retrofit existing facilities. Some of the complications with retrofitting facilities include adding adequate doorways. Depending on the design of the structure, adding doorways can be complicated and require an extensive amount of remodeling. Other complications include retrofitting areas with stairs and restrooms with stalls that are too narrow. Moving plumbing may require the existing floor to be torn out and require a lot of time.

Read the remainder of the story here: http://ehstoday.com/safety/addressing-safety-challenges-disabled-workers

Source: EHS Today®

Download Free “Safety Photo of the Day” Screensaver – Windows PC

Why Lock Out - Tag Out Is So Important

    “Why Lock – Out, Tag- Out is vitally important!”

Download your Free “Safety Photo of the Day” screensaver at the link below or in the Box.net files to the right side of this page. This is Virus Free and for Windows OS only. Each photo and cartoon will give you and those around you extra incentive in making sure that your company’s Safety Program is a “proactive” one!

All feedback and comments welcomed, as this is the first screensaver I’ve made for my safety peers! Some photos may not have optimum clarity, but it’s worth a download! Download here: https://www.box.net/shared/vojj1g8e1oea8qvo7ixh

Be Safe!

Jack Benton

 

Infographic – “Dangers On The Job”

Dangers on the job

Reality TV programming allows viewers to see inside the lives of ice road truckers, ax men and ‘extreme’ fishermen. These risky jobs make for good television – and maybe, these shows allow the rest of us to experience some of the thrill of facing death on a daily basis. After all, you’re likely not going to encounter a hurricane or angry bear at your office today.

You’re probably familiar with the typical hazards of your job and have ways of protecting yourself from them. Some jobs require serious protection like safety gloves, hard hats and goggles. But if you work in a daycare or around young children, you may be more concerned with having antibacterial soap and hand sanitizer at all times.

Often, the jobs that pose the most risk come with the greatest rewards. That’s one reason why professional football players make so much money; there’s a possibility a player will be injured to the point of permanent disability. Similarly, think of all that can go wrong for an astronaut. But the reward for taking the risk of space flight is being one of the few people to ever see the planet from outside the Earth’s atmosphere.

Workplace safety has come a long way in the past 100 years. But whether you’re an astronaut or a small-town school teacher, your job carries some risk, as shown in this infographic:

Dream Jobs and Cool Workplace Tools

Protective equipment can ensure workplace safety.

Tunnel Vision: CSB Incorrectly Labeling All Hoeganaes Incidents As Combustible Dust Flash Fires

Photo Credit: U.S. Chemical Safety Board -“Large hole (approximately 3 x 7 inches) in a corroded section of piping that carried hydrogen and ran through the trench.”

Incorrect labeling the third Hoeganaes incident on MAY 27, 2011 as a combustible dust flash fire resulting in three fatalities. “…not just one, not just two, but three — three! — combustible dust flash fires.” They killed a total of five workers and injured three others.In contrast, according to the CSB Hoeganaes Case Study, the third incident was a hydrogen vapor cloud explosion (VCE) where hydrogen was ignited following a leakage from a corroded section of piping conveying hydrogen. http://www.csb.gov/assets/document/CSB_Case_Study_Hoeganaes_Feb3_300-1.pdf (page 6 .pdf)

There were no reported thermal burns of employees from combustible dust flash fires in this incident. “Two mechanics near the forklift were transported to a local hospital where they were treated for smoke inhalation and released shortly thereafter.”

“Witnesses saw burning dust raining down from above. However, the witness statements as well as the physical evidence leave no doubt that combustible iron dust was also involved in the aftermath of the explosion. Examining the scene following the incident, CSB investigators observed splattering of burned iron dust.” http://www.csb.gov/assets/news/document/Final_Statement_6_3_2011.pdf (page 2-3 .pdf)

Since when does burning dust raining down from above resulting in splattering of burned iron dust on the deck constitute a combustible dust flash fire? A ComDust flash fire requires a minimum explosive concentration (MEC). Burning dust raining down is not a flash fire.

Tunnel vision ignoring other explosive atmospheres in conjunction with accident investigations determining root and contributing cause regarding mechanical integrity in close proximity to combustible dust is not the solution in comprehensively addressing best practices from lessons-learned.

“Powdered metals plant in Gallatin Tennessee had not just one, not just two, but three — three! — combustible dust flash fires. They killed a total of five workers and injured three others.”

The “company’s lack of adherence to rigorous dust control standards was the primary cause of the incidents due to large dust accumulations throughout the facility. ” http://www.csb.gov/assets/news/document/ICC_Speech_10_22_2012.pdf (page 3 .pdf)

So lack of adherence to rigorous dust control standards was the primary cause of the corroded hydrogen piping resulting in the catastrophic hydrogen vapor cloud explosion (VCE) with three fatalities? What about adherence to best industry practices referencing ASME B31.12 Hydrogen Piping and Pipelines, NFPA 55 Compressed Gases and Cryogenic Fluids, CGA G-5.4 Standard for Hydrogen Piping Systems at User Locations and NFPA 2 Hydrogen Technologies Code in preventing future catastrophic hydrogen vapor cloud explosions?

Excellent resource from the EUROPEAN INDUSTRIAL GASES ASSOCIATION. “Scope of this document is for metallic transmission and distribution piping systems carrying pure hydrogen and hydrogen mixtures.” Must read section on corrosion protection for underground pipelines. Did the Hoeganaes hydrogen pipeline have sufficient corrosion protection? http://h2bestpractices.org/docs/Doc121_04%20H2TransportationPipelines.pdf

Solely referring to the primary cause of the hydrogen vapor cloud explosion as large dust accumulations throughout the facility could possibly overlook more pertinent root and contributing causes such as insufficient corrosion protection. Are global stakeholders aware their underground hydrogen piping is at potential risk?

Post Contributor: John Astad – The Combustible Dust Policy Institute – Combustible Dust Blog: http://dustexplosions.blogspot.com/

 

Over 250,000 Served! Thank You!

We have hit and surpassed the 250,000th visit from Safety Professionals across the globe. I started this Blog 2 years ago and never dreamed it would go over so well with my fellow Safety Pro’s!

I started this Blog to brand myself in my job search and to post relevant information that both safety professionals and the general public can use. This is just a teaching tool, and I make no money from it.

Thank you to all of  our readers! This milestone wouldn’t be possible without you!

Stay Safe!

Jack Benton

Even in the Loss Prevention Field, Safety IS a Must! – “Retro Surveillance at the Purple Cow”

Back in the early 80’s I worked for a large retailer with limited video surveillance technology from the 70’s. I’m talking cameras with vacuum tubes in them. Box cameras that really were the size of shoebox. Invariably, they never worked. Between age, little to no maintenance, and multiple points of failure—these cameras were practically useless for critical surveillance.

The retailer was Meijer (now the 13th largest privately owned company in the United States with 75,000 employees). 30 years ago it was definitely a simpler time, but employee theft investigations were as prevalent as they are today. But, from where I sit, they were just much more difficult to conduct.

While camera technology was horrible, cash register technology was only marginally better. NCR cash register systems didn’t give you printed exception reports of any value, but you could “tap” into a register in the store and get a running log of transactions being recorded on an active register. Of course, that only helped when you identified a register/employee that warranted logging of real-time transactions. And the method to determine that was exhaustive.

Back then it involved a daily review of select cash register tapes based on the rudimentary reports the system did provide—or, more likely—on manual cash over and short reports from the night before. While most Loss Prevention professionals in the industry for any length of time know—for the benefit of those who don’t—the overages were often more telling than the shortages. Overages could point to any number of potential register thefts, with failing to record sales being a big one.

At Meijer, we had the Purple Cow. The Purple Cow was the name of the ice cream counter which (at that time) was located inside the front area of a Meijer store, just outside the checkouts. (Stores today typically have a much scaled down version of the Purple Cow located inside the checkouts). It was a pretty typical ice cream counter. You could get 30 or more flavors of ice cream cones or sundaes, along with soft drinks, and baked goods—as a bakery usually shared the counter space.

The Purple Cow is the subject of this review of retro-style surveillance from 30 years ago.

A daily review of register tapes and observation on multiple occasions from afar suggested an employee in the Purple Cow was collecting customer monies for transactions and working from an open register—not recording sales—throughout her entire shift.

When you have an employee putting customer money in the drawer but not ringing in the sale it creates an overage of money in the register drawer. The cashier removes that “extra” money from the register late in her shift to pocket the cash and to make the drawer balance when it gets turned in.

It can be difficult to keep track of how much of an overage has been created during a shift of not ringing up sales (some employees had ways of trying to keep track—but most methods are not exact due to the time it takes and the increased risk of being found out if you take the time to be exact). Because of this, it is not uncommon for a cashier to have collected, let’s say, $43.56 that was not rung up during a shift. As their shift ends they pocket an amount that is easy to quickly take—in this case two twenty dollar bills—leaving the overage of $3.56 when the drawer is counted.

So, how do you confirm that a suspected theft of this nature is taking place? Thirty years ago when your cameras were useless, you had strike one. That caused strike two because you couldn’t really make use of the NCR ability to tap into a cash register without a working camera. Strike three was the very open location of the Purple Cow counter, making surveillance difficult.

Difficult, but not impossible. We went to the ceiling, above the register. More specifically, to me, in the ceiling, above the register. Yes, that is how it was done before we had the security technology we have today. Real people—eyeballs on the scene—up close, but covert.

Here is how it worked. To set the stage you need to know there was a time when these stores were not 24 hour a day operations. They closed at 10PM to customers and while most nights a third shift did cleaning and re-stocked shelves, even that was not every night. So, on nights when no one was in these 130,000 sq. ft. stores, a couple security staff would go in and install a plywood platform, attached by chains to the rafters above the drop ceiling—in areas where investigations were ongoing. In this case, above the Purple Cow register. In most cases we would put in a fake ceiling vent in order to see the register from the platform.

With the platform installed, we’d put the ceiling tiles back in place, clean up the area and put everything back in order like we’d never been there.

Fortunately, in this store (long since torn down and rebuilt 50 yards away), the space throughout the store above the drop ceiling was expansive. This was due to the quonset hut style roof that covered the entire store—with series after series of arching spaces about 50 feet wide above the entire drop ceiling. This structure along with the fire sprinkler piping just above the drop ceiling, allowed for walking on rafters and sprinkler pipes (looking back, the code and safety violations were extensive!) through much of the store above the drop ceiling.

Here is how the surveillance went.

The employee who is suspected of theft is scheduled to work her shift from 5PM – 9PM. I have pre-arranged with another security agent to have them view the scene from afar while I view from the hanging platform. Around 4PM I get up into the ceiling some 200 feet away from the Purple Cow in a backroom where I can do so without being noticed. I am armed with a 35mm camera with a telephoto lens and the entire set-up is wrapped in foam to lessen the sound of the shutter when a photo is taken. I also have a notepad and flashlight to document what I view as I view it. I make my way across the rafters and sprinkler pipes and onto the plywood platform hanging by chains from the rafters. As quietly as possible, I get into position flat on my stomach with my head at the end of the platform so I can view through the vent we put in—seeing the register display, cash drawer, and the surrounding area for a few feet around it.

The employee begins her shift and I begin to document transactions where she does not ring the sale, but puts money into the register. This happens throughout the shift. I write down times and what was sold—cones, drinks, etc…

Sometimes I am watching through the camera lens and sometimes I am just watching directly. The first photo I snap of a no sale transaction is met with worry that I can be heard. To me the sound of my platform and camera are magnified—partly due to my precarious position, partly due to my hypersensitive state upon seeing that theft is occurring and I am witnessing it from less than six feet away.

A little after 8:30 I am watching the employee standing at the closed register. Business has slowed. Her shift ends soon. And, as is often the case after having done this for a couple years now, it becomes apparent that she is visibly nervous—scanning in all directions around her and moving very little. She opens the cash register drawer with no customers around, and stands very close to the register. I watch as she quickly removes two twenty dollar bills from the register, rolling them into one hand, still looking around and then pocketing the bills into her right front pants pocket, using her apron to slightly conceal the theft. The drawer is closed. The overage she had been creating all night by not ringing in sales is now removed—and in her pocket. I took photos but even I am unsure if I caught the exact moment of the theft. The employee moves away from the register and from my view, but I can hear her cleaning up her work area below me.

Soon, I feel it is safe to move from my hanging platform and make the trek across the rafters and pipes and back to where I am out of the ceiling. I meet my co-worker on the sales floor—watching things unfold from a distance. I inform him that we have the theft documented. We wait a bit longer, observing from a distance as the acting store manager arrives to review the work area and ensure it is clean before allowing the employee to cash out and end her shift. As she is cleared to go and removes her drawer for the short walk to the cash office, my co-worker and I approach and ask to speak to her in the security office.

Because the focus of this article is on surveillance, I’ll cut to the chase. We took a written statement where the employee confessed to the theft and to doing the same thing on every shift she worked for about the last month—estimating about 10-12 times for a total of maybe $400-$500. We have the acting store manager and a union steward come to the security office. The manager suspends the employee based on the written statement. (A couple of days later, the Store Director terminated the employment of the employee).

That, my readers, is how covert surveillance was done 30 years ago—when technology was horrible. Call it “Old School” if you will—I certainly do. Although calling it resourceful, and maybe even crazy, would also be in order. If nothing else it demonstrated something about going the extra mile to conduct an investigation for our employer.

Over the years I have conducted close to 500 employee investigations—in multiple industries. I am happy to report that technology over that time has improved and the bulk of those investigations benefited from more modern surveillance and point-of-sale technologies.

If I add it all up, I may have spent 200 hours hanging from plywood platforms in those early days—not always over the Purple Cow—but on nearly a dozen similar set-ups in that ceiling.

That is my Retro Surveillance story from the Purple Cow.

In 30 years, of course, there are many stories, but I don’t share them from a perspective of “the good ole days” or anything of the sort. I share this one for a couple of reasons.

One, I share it as a change of pace. The Security/Investigations business is a very serious business and often our daily responsibilities are filled with never-ending seriousness. A brief trip back to an earlier time allows for a laugh or two at how much things have changed.

But, more importantly, I share the story for those coming up in the security/investigations business. Because I think the story (even with the craziness of the Purple Cow) helps illustrate that—whatever your security task or investigation—and whatever challenges or obstacles you might run into—YOU can work with what you have to accomplish your task. That task may be to impact the absolutely crippling effects of employee theft on business, or it may be protecting a facility from countless potential threats.

In the end, technology or no technology, this business is still a people business and security and investigations professionals can’t lose sight of that

About Vince Regan

Vince Regan, CPP, PSP, PCI is one of the most highly credentialed security professionals in the world. As Voice of Security President, he works full time to inform and educate colleagues in the security industry.

View all posts by Vince Regan →

%d bloggers like this: