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“Addressing Safety Challenges for Disabled Workers” – “How Do You Get Through Your Day?”

Richie Parker, HMS Engineer -“How Do You Get Through Your Day?” – Video Courtesy of Hendrick Motorsports® ESPN®

Employees in today’s workplace face many challenges. Work forces have been cut, and in many cases, workdays have been extended. Older workers are unable to retire, while younger workers are unable to find work. New technology is introduced into the workplace, requiring all to relearn how to perform their jobs. This is difficult for the average worker, but it is extremely difficult if an employee is further hindered by disabilities.

Disabilities of all types affect employees and can pose various mental or physical challenges. In many situations, a disability may impact the amount of time it takes for an employee to complete a task or get from one part of a facility to another. Some disabilities may be known while others remain unknown to an employer. Thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), employees with disabilities can continue to work without fear of losing their jobs1.

All employees with disabilities deserve the right to support their families. If otherwise qualified for a job, a disability should not take away an individual’s opportunity to work. Existing laws protected those discriminated against for race, sex, national origin and color, but the ADA was the first law to speak for those with disabilities in the workplace.

The ADA disallows discrimination against otherwise qualified individuals in an employment setting because of mental or physical disabilities2. This means that in many situations, the employer has to adjust a work environment to allow an employee to function. In 2009, the ADA was amended to include additional information and coverage. This amendment required the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to make changes to their regulations regarding the term “substantially limits” and how it is defined2. It also broadens the definition of “major life activities” to include many new activities.

Workplace Adaptations

As with any law that changes the workplace, some fight or avoid it while others fully embrace and promote it. One major compliance concern deals with accessibility. Because of this, many workplaces have adjusted or created more accessible entrances and exits to their facilities, allowing more independence for persons in wheelchairs. Other subtle changes may include the height of water fountains, width of bathroom stalls, hand rails inside the stalls and long ramps instead of stairs. The path of travel that employees take should never be obstructed; there should be no barriers to prevent someone from getting to safety in an emergency3.

Making accommodations in the workplace is important, yet one must avoid making a spectacle of employees with disabilities. One concept being utilized in workplaces is universal design, which is best defined as designing products and work spaces to allow use by everyone, regardless of disability4. This eliminates many cases of employees standing out or requiring special assistance to be able to complete their tasks. Better designed work spaces can increase function for all employees, regardless of age4. This still is a relatively new idea and few examples exist in the workplace despite multiple studies proving the effectiveness.

The goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate on completing job tasks.

Workstations easily can be adapted to follow this universal design. Many companies now use slide-out keyboard trays and monitors on swinging arms to allow employees to adjust to their needs. Desks can accommodate wheelchairs in place of regular chairs, and general work spaces can be lowered to allow easier access. All workplaces eventually will follow the universal design approach3. The main goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate more on completing their tasks.

The biggest challenge with universal design is accommodating the multitude of challenges that different disabilities present. Not all disabilities are the same, and not all will present the same challenges for employees. Some employees may have issues with their right hand while others have issues with their left. For some, it may involve not being able to stand or sit. Some may need low lighting, while others need bright lighting. Designing a facility to accommodate all is always going to be a challenge.

Some disabilities require a service animal to be able to get around or reach materials. ADA protects those that need such animals. This can create another complication for an employer if other employees are allergic to such animals. The employer must work with all parties involved to find a solution.

Companies using older facilities often have the most trouble complying with guidelines of the ADA. Designing a building from the ground up is much easier than attempting to retrofit existing facilities. Some of the complications with retrofitting facilities include adding adequate doorways. Depending on the design of the structure, adding doorways can be complicated and require an extensive amount of remodeling. Other complications include retrofitting areas with stairs and restrooms with stalls that are too narrow. Moving plumbing may require the existing floor to be torn out and require a lot of time.

Read the remainder of the story here: http://ehstoday.com/safety/addressing-safety-challenges-disabled-workers

Source: EHS Today®

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“Australia Officially Has The Most Adorably Morbid Safety Video Ever!”

WARNING: Do not attempt any of the things mentioned in this video. Except that last thing. Definitely do the last thing. Oh, and sorry in advance if this gets stuck in your head.

Australia Officially Has The Most Adorably Morbid Safety Video Ever

WARNING: Do not attempt any of the things mentioned in this video. Except that last thing. Definitely do the last thing. Oh, and sorry in advance if this gets stuck in your head.

Addressing Safety Challenges for Disabled Workers – “How Do You Get Through Your Day?”

Richie Parker, HMS Engineer -“How Do You Get Through Your Day?” – Video Courtesy of Hendrick Motorsports® ESPN®

Employees in today’s workplace face many challenges. Work forces have been cut, and in many cases, workdays have been extended. Older workers are unable to retire, while younger workers are unable to find work. New technology is introduced into the workplace, requiring all to relearn how to perform their jobs. This is difficult for the average worker, but it is extremely difficult if an employee is further hindered by disabilities.

Disabilities of all types affect employees and can pose various mental or physical challenges. In many situations, a disability may impact the amount of time it takes for an employee to complete a task or get from one part of a facility to another. Some disabilities may be known while others remain unknown to an employer. Thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), employees with disabilities can continue to work without fear of losing their jobs1.

All employees with disabilities deserve the right to support their families. If otherwise qualified for a job, a disability should not take away an individual’s opportunity to work. Existing laws protected those discriminated against for race, sex, national origin and color, but the ADA was the first law to speak for those with disabilities in the workplace.

The ADA disallows discrimination against otherwise qualified individuals in an employment setting because of mental or physical disabilities2. This means that in many situations, the employer has to adjust a work environment to allow an employee to function. In 2009, the ADA was amended to include additional information and coverage. This amendment required the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to make changes to their regulations regarding the term “substantially limits” and how it is defined2. It also broadens the definition of “major life activities” to include many new activities.

Workplace Adaptations

As with any law that changes the workplace, some fight or avoid it while others fully embrace and promote it. One major compliance concern deals with accessibility. Because of this, many workplaces have adjusted or created more accessible entrances and exits to their facilities, allowing more independence for persons in wheelchairs. Other subtle changes may include the height of water fountains, width of bathroom stalls, hand rails inside the stalls and long ramps instead of stairs. The path of travel that employees take should never be obstructed; there should be no barriers to prevent someone from getting to safety in an emergency3.

Making accommodations in the workplace is important, yet one must avoid making a spectacle of employees with disabilities. One concept being utilized in workplaces is universal design, which is best defined as designing products and work spaces to allow use by everyone, regardless of disability4. This eliminates many cases of employees standing out or requiring special assistance to be able to complete their tasks. Better designed work spaces can increase function for all employees, regardless of age4. This still is a relatively new idea and few examples exist in the workplace despite multiple studies proving the effectiveness.

The goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate on completing job tasks.

Workstations easily can be adapted to follow this universal design. Many companies now use slide-out keyboard trays and monitors on swinging arms to allow employees to adjust to their needs. Desks can accommodate wheelchairs in place of regular chairs, and general work spaces can be lowered to allow easier access. All workplaces eventually will follow the universal design approach3. The main goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate more on completing their tasks.

The biggest challenge with universal design is accommodating the multitude of challenges that different disabilities present. Not all disabilities are the same, and not all will present the same challenges for employees. Some employees may have issues with their right hand while others have issues with their left. For some, it may involve not being able to stand or sit. Some may need low lighting, while others need bright lighting. Designing a facility to accommodate all is always going to be a challenge.

Some disabilities require a service animal to be able to get around or reach materials. ADA protects those that need such animals. This can create another complication for an employer if other employees are allergic to such animals. The employer must work with all parties involved to find a solution.

Companies using older facilities often have the most trouble complying with guidelines of the ADA. Designing a building from the ground up is much easier than attempting to retrofit existing facilities. Some of the complications with retrofitting facilities include adding adequate doorways. Depending on the design of the structure, adding doorways can be complicated and require an extensive amount of remodeling. Other complications include retrofitting areas with stairs and restrooms with stalls that are too narrow. Moving plumbing may require the existing floor to be torn out and require a lot of time.

Read the remainder of the story here: http://ehstoday.com/safety/addressing-safety-challenges-disabled-workers

Source: EHS Today®

Tips On How To Write a Good Accident Or Incident Report

workplace_safety

An incident report needs to include all the essential information about the accident or near-miss. The report-writing process begins with fact finding and ends with recommendations for preventing future accidents.

You may use a special incident reporting form, and it might be quite extensive. But writing any incident report involves four basic steps, and those are the focus of today’s post.

1. Find the Facts

To prepare for writing an accident report, you have to gather and record all the facts. For example:

· Date, time, and specific location of incident

· Names, job titles, and department of employees involved and immediate supervisor(s)

· Names and accounts of witnesses

· Events leading up to incident

· Exactly what employee was doing at the moment of the accident

· Environmental conditions (e.g. slippery floor, inadequate lighting, noise, etc.)

· Circumstances (including tasks, equipment, tools, materials, PPE, etc.)

· Specific injuries (including part(s) of body injured and nature and extent of injuries)

· Type of treatment for injuries

· Damage to equipment, materials, etc.

2. Determine the Sequence

Based on the facts, you should be able to determine the sequence of events. In your report, describe this sequence in detail, including:

· Events leading up to the incident. Was the employee walking, running, bending over, squatting, climbing, lifting operating machinery, pushing a broom, turning a valve, using a tool, handling hazardous materials, etc.?

· Events involved in the incident. Was the employee struck by an object or caught in/on/between objects? Did the worker fall on the same level or from a height? Did the employee inhale hazardous vapors or get splashed with a hazardous chemical?

· Events immediately following the incident. What did the employee do: Grab a knee? Start limping? Hold his/her arm? Complain about back pain? Put a hand over a bleeding wound? Also describe how other co-workers responded. Did they call for help, administer first aid, shut down equipment, move the victim, etc.?

The incident should be described on the report in sufficient detail that any reader can clearly picture what happened. You might consider creating a diagram to show, in a simple and visually effective manner, the sequence of events related to the incident and include this in your incident report. You might also wish to include photos of the accident scene, which may help readers follow the sequence of events.

3. Analyze

Your report should include an in-depth analysis of the causes of the accident. Causes include:

· Primary cause (e.g., a spill on the floor that caused a slip and fall)

· Secondary causes (e.g., employee not wearing appropriate work shoes or carrying a stack of material that blocked vision)

· Other contributing factors (e.g., burned out light bulb in the area).

4. Recommend

Recommendations for corrective action might include immediate corrective action as well as long-term corrective actions such as:

· Employee training on safe work practices

· Preventive maintenance activities that keep equipment in good operating condition

· Evaluation of job procedures with a recommendation for changes

· Conducting a job hazard analysis to evaluate the task for any other hazards and then train employees on these hazards

· Engineering changes that make the task safer or administrative changes that might include changing the way the task is performed

 

Addressing Safety Challenges for Disabled Workers – “How Do You Get Through Your Day?”

Richie Parker, HMS Engineer -“How Do You Get Through Your Day?” – Video Courtesy of Hendrick Motorsports® ESPN®

Employees in today’s workplace face many challenges. Work forces have been cut, and in many cases, workdays have been extended. Older workers are unable to retire, while younger workers are unable to find work. New technology is introduced into the workplace, requiring all to relearn how to perform their jobs. This is difficult for the average worker, but it is extremely difficult if an employee is further hindered by disabilities.

Disabilities of all types affect employees and can pose various mental or physical challenges. In many situations, a disability may impact the amount of time it takes for an employee to complete a task or get from one part of a facility to another. Some disabilities may be known while others remain unknown to an employer. Thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), employees with disabilities can continue to work without fear of losing their jobs1.

All employees with disabilities deserve the right to support their families. If otherwise qualified for a job, a disability should not take away an individual’s opportunity to work. Existing laws protected those discriminated against for race, sex, national origin and color, but the ADA was the first law to speak for those with disabilities in the workplace.

The ADA disallows discrimination against otherwise qualified individuals in an employment setting because of mental or physical disabilities2. This means that in many situations, the employer has to adjust a work environment to allow an employee to function. In 2009, the ADA was amended to include additional information and coverage. This amendment required the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to make changes to their regulations regarding the term “substantially limits” and how it is defined2. It also broadens the definition of “major life activities” to include many new activities.

Workplace Adaptations

As with any law that changes the workplace, some fight or avoid it while others fully embrace and promote it. One major compliance concern deals with accessibility. Because of this, many workplaces have adjusted or created more accessible entrances and exits to their facilities, allowing more independence for persons in wheelchairs. Other subtle changes may include the height of water fountains, width of bathroom stalls, hand rails inside the stalls and long ramps instead of stairs. The path of travel that employees take should never be obstructed; there should be no barriers to prevent someone from getting to safety in an emergency3.

Making accommodations in the workplace is important, yet one must avoid making a spectacle of employees with disabilities. One concept being utilized in workplaces is universal design, which is best defined as designing products and work spaces to allow use by everyone, regardless of disability4. This eliminates many cases of employees standing out or requiring special assistance to be able to complete their tasks. Better designed work spaces can increase function for all employees, regardless of age4. This still is a relatively new idea and few examples exist in the workplace despite multiple studies proving the effectiveness.

The goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate on completing job tasks.

Workstations easily can be adapted to follow this universal design. Many companies now use slide-out keyboard trays and monitors on swinging arms to allow employees to adjust to their needs. Desks can accommodate wheelchairs in place of regular chairs, and general work spaces can be lowered to allow easier access. All workplaces eventually will follow the universal design approach3. The main goal is to remove all barriers and allow everyone to concentrate more on completing their tasks.

The biggest challenge with universal design is accommodating the multitude of challenges that different disabilities present. Not all disabilities are the same, and not all will present the same challenges for employees. Some employees may have issues with their right hand while others have issues with their left. For some, it may involve not being able to stand or sit. Some may need low lighting, while others need bright lighting. Designing a facility to accommodate all is always going to be a challenge.

Some disabilities require a service animal to be able to get around or reach materials. ADA protects those that need such animals. This can create another complication for an employer if other employees are allergic to such animals. The employer must work with all parties involved to find a solution.

Companies using older facilities often have the most trouble complying with guidelines of the ADA. Designing a building from the ground up is much easier than attempting to retrofit existing facilities. Some of the complications with retrofitting facilities include adding adequate doorways. Depending on the design of the structure, adding doorways can be complicated and require an extensive amount of remodeling. Other complications include retrofitting areas with stairs and restrooms with stalls that are too narrow. Moving plumbing may require the existing floor to be torn out and require a lot of time.

Read the remainder of the story here: http://ehstoday.com/safety/addressing-safety-challenges-disabled-workers

Source: EHS Today®

OSHA QuickTakes – August 6, 2013

image002

In this issue

White House releases executive order on improving chemical facility safety and security


New Labor Secretary committed to workplace safety and health


Hazard alert warns of dangers of 1-bromopropane exposure


OSHA, NWS remind employers to protect outdoor workers during heat wave


Three companies ordered to reinstate workers for whistleblower violations of clean air, surface transportation and aviation acts


Echo Lake Foods fined $150,000 for 27 safety violations


Western Sugar Cooperative cited for combustible dust and other hazards


Arkansas poultry processor cited for exposing workers to hazardous chemicals


OSHA releases new fall prevention training guide with “tool box talks”


ASA/OSHA webinar reminds employers to train, protect all temp workers


Webinar answers questions about GHS requirements


OSHA schedules ACCSH meeting


Outreach campaign aims to protect health care workers from musculoskeletal disorders


OSHA helps NH responders prep for emergencies


OSHA demonstrates safe grain handling at Wisconsin Farm Tech Days


Free On-site Consultation program helps small businesses improve workplace safety and health


OSHA and partners count successes in oil and gas safety stand-down


Follow us on Twitter and visit us on Facebook


New OSHA Web resources available


Better health insurance choices coming in October 2013

Engineer – Driver In Fatal Spanish Train Crash Is Arrested

SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA, Spain — The train driver did little to hide his taste for speed. He posted a photograph of a locomotive speedometer needle stuck at 200 kilometers per hour, or about 125 miles m.p.h., on Facebook last year, boasting that the reading “has not been tampered with” and openly relishing the idea of racing past the authorities.

“Imagine what a rush it would be traveling alongside the Civil Guard, and passing them so that their speed traps go off,” he wrote, in all capitals. “Hehe, that would be quite a fine for Renfe, hehe,” referring to his employer, the Spanish rail company.

The train driver, Francisco José Garzón Amo, a veteran with more than three decades of experience, was arrested on Friday, and investigators were examining records from the train’s “black box,” or data recorder, to determine how it smashed into a curved wall and careered off the track on Wednesday, killing 78 people and leaving dozens injured.

On Friday, Jaime Iglesias, a national police force commander in Galicia, said the authorities had the black box data from the train, which was traveling between Madrid r and Ferrol, in northwestern Spain, and crashed outside Santiago de Compostela. But he could not say how long it would take to determine the cause of the crash, one of Europe’s worst recent rail disasters, or to verify reports that the train was traveling at twice the speed limit.

Mr. Iglesias said the death toll had been revised down to 78 from 80 after the identification of bodies. Those killed include an American, an Algerian and a Mexican, he said.

As seen in a chilling video from a security camera, the passenger train rounded a curve at high speed on Wednesday night, tumbling violently off the track, slamming against a curved wall and piling up in a twisted wreck.

On Thursday, Spanish news media reported that the driver had said the train’s speed had been about 120 miles per hour, more than double the limit in the stretch of track where the train derailed. On the day of the wreck, he took over from another driver just 60 miles before the crash, according to Spanish news reports.

The train was almost full, carrying more than 200 passengers and merrymakers returning to the region for a special holiday on Thursday. July 25 is the feast day for St. James the Apostle, the patron saint of Spain, who for centuries has inspired pilgrims to walk El Camino de Santiago, or the Way of St. James. The pilgrimage has had a burst of popularity in recent years, drawing walkers from around the world.

After the crash, the city of Santiago de Compostela canceled its extensive celebration and the authorities urged people to donate blood. Thousands made a very different kind of pilgrimage to the site of the disaster, watching as rescuers used cranes and trucks to hoist the engines of the wrecked train. All — children, teenagers and older people — stood in funereal silence.

Nearby, in a building where an information center had been set up, police officers kept the victims’ families from the public eye. Some walked around the building in tears, hugging and comforting one another, while others grew frustrated waiting to see their loved ones.

“Now, at 9:30 p.m., is when they allowed us to go and see our family member,” said María, a relative of a victim who did not want her full name used. “Twenty-four hours waiting, in these conditions. That’s too much.”

Most high-speed lines that are part of the European rail traffic system are covered by a GPS-based surveillance network that constantly monitors trains’ speed and automatically brakes them at speed limits.

Slower trains and trains crossing urban areas in Spain and other countries use a less intrusive system that warns the driver with sound and lights at excessive speeds, but does not automatically brake the train, said María Carmen Palao, a spokeswoman for Spain’s ADIF rail infrastructure company.

The accident, she said, took place two to three miles outside the station at Santiago de Compostela, in the “transition zone” between the two systems. The wreck occurred on the Galicia line, run by the rail operator Renfe and opened in 2011.

The Spanish newspaper El País reported that people at the train company said alcohol had not been found in Mr. Garzón’s system, but the security video showing the train barreling into the turn and abruptly careening off the rails quickly raised concerns that he was traveling too fast.

Even in his Facebook message, posted in 2012 but removed late Thursday morning, Mr. Garzón elicited some astounded comments from friends.

“Dude, you’re going full speed, braaaaake,” one commenter wrote.

“Christ, you’re doing 200km/h,” another said.

Read the rest of the story here: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/27/world/europe/spain-train-crash.html?_r=0

Silvia Taulés reported from Santiago de Compostela, and Doreen Carvajal from Paris. Stephen Castle contributed reporting from London, and Caroline Brothers from Paris.

Source: New York Times

CSB – West Fertilizer and Williams Olefins Explosions Testimony

CSB

CLICK HERE to view the written statement
CLICK HERE to view the CSB’s preliminary findings
BEGIN TESTIMONY
Chairman Boxer, Senator Vitter, and distinguished Committee members – thank you for inviting me today.  I am CSB Chairperson Rafael Moure-Eraso.
The two explosions we are discussing today – West Fertilizer and Williams Olefins – are tragedies of the kind that should be prevented.
The destruction I personally saw in West – the obliteration of homes, schools, and businesses by an ammonium nitrate explosion – was almost beyond imagination.  The loss of life was horrible.
The CSB has determined that ammonium nitrate fertilizer storage falls under a patchwork of U.S. safety standards and guidance – a patchwork that has many large holes.
These holes include: the use of combustible wooden buildings and wooden storage bins, sprinklers generally not required, and no federal, state, or local rules restricting the storage of large amounts of ammonium nitrate near homes, schools and hospitals.
Voluntary fire codes have some useful provisions for ammonium nitrate.  But Texas and most of its counties have no fire code.  So at West, these fire code provisions were strictly voluntary, and West Fertilizer had not volunteered.  Our investigators learned that combustible seeds were stored near the ammonium nitrate, not separated by any fire-resistant partition.
OSHA has some similar provisions for ammonium nitrate fertilizer in its Explosives standard, 1910.109.  However, OSHA has not focused extensively on ammonium nitrate storage and hadn’t inspected West since 1985.
Other nations have gone much further than the U.S. on ammonium nitrate safety.  The UK recommends dedicated, noncombustible storage buildings and noncombustible bins.  The U.S. manufacturer, CF Industries, recommends the same and urges sprinklers as well.
But the fertilizer industry tells us that U.S. sites commonly store ammonium nitrate in wooden buildings and bins – even near homes, schools, or other vulnerable facilities.  This situation must be addressed.
Preventing the risk of fire essentially eliminates the potential for an explosion like we saw in West, by removing one of the preconditions for detonation.
Facilities like West fall outside existing federal process safety standards, which were developed in the 1990’s and are list-based.
Ammonium nitrate would likely have been included, if the EPA had adopted our 2002 recommendation to cover reactive chemicals under its Risk Management Program.
But the modestly sized RMP program is no panacea; it already covers large refineries and petrochemical sites – including Williams Olefins – and yet we still see serious accidents.
The Williams plant has over a hundred workers, producing ethylene and propylene.
On June 13, there was a catastrophic failure involving a heat exchanger and associated piping which broke loose from a distillation tower.   The ensuing explosion led to the deaths of two employees.  We join in mourning their loss.
It is too soon in our investigation to tell why the equipment failure occurred.
The bigger picture in process safety is that EPA and OSHA resources are under duress.  Regulations need to be modernized – but more inspection and prevention are needed as well.
Meantime, we are finding encouraging alternatives to the current situation:
Following the Chevron refinery fire last year, and acting upon CSB recommendations, California is poised to triple the number of dedicated process safety inspectors … funded by industry fees.
Another promising approach is the ‘safety case’– successfully used in other nations, which insurers say have much lower petrochemical accident rates than we do.
Companies identify and commit to follow the best safety standards from around the world, subject to approval and oversight by a competent, well-funded regulator.  Many experts believe this is the best safety regime for complex, technological industries, rather than the U.S. system which calls upon a prescriptive and often outdated rule book.
Thank you again for the opportunity to testify today.
END TESTIMONY

Truck Driver Safety – “Did You Check That Clearance… Clarence?”

Always Know Your Trucks Clearance Height and Make Sure It Will Clear A Bridge Overpass!

OSHA regulations govern the safety and health of the workers and the responsibilities of employers to ensure their safety at the warehouse, dock, construction site, and in other places truckers go to deliver and pick up loads throughout the country. While OSHA does not regulate self-employed truckers, it does regulate workplaces to which the truckers deliver goods and the workers which receive those goods.

The trucking industry is addressed in specific standards for record keeping and the general industry.

OSHA Standards

This section highlights OSHA standards, directives (instructions for compliance officers), standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and whistleblower protection may be applicable to a trucker depending on the location, activity, type of material handled and industry.

Note: Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illness (29 CFR 1904) [related topic page]

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)

OSHA is preempted by Section 4(b)1 of the OSH Act from enforcing its regulations if a working condition is regulated by another Federal agency.

For example:

  • While traveling on public highways, the Department of Transportation (DOT) has jurisdiction. However, while loading and unloading trucks, OSHA regulations govern the safety and health of the workers and the responsibilities of employers to ensure their safety at the warehouse, at the dock, at the rig, at the construction site, at the airport terminal and in all places truckers go to deliver and pick up loads.
  • While operating at an airport, if there is an operational plan negotiated between the carrier and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) that covers a working condition, then the FAA has jurisdiction.
  • Due to the DOT brake regulation, OSHA does not cite for failure to chock trailer wheels if the vehicle is otherwise adequately secured. DOT’s regulation preempts enforcement and DOT has jurisdiction. However, if the vehicle is an intrastate truck, OSHA has jurisdiction. Only another Federal agency may preempt OSHA’s jurisdiction

Directives

Standard Interpretations

  • Review of Policy on Section 4(b)(1) of the Act. (1989, July 10). Discusses the scope of Section 4(b)1; that is, if the other agency’s regulation (or the lack of one) does not cover the hazard in question, then the OSH Act’s requirements are not preempted. The terms “working conditions” and “gap theory,” are discussed. For example, if the Office of Motor Carrier Safety (OMCS) has a regulation addressing a certain working condition (or hazard), then OSHA would be preempted from applying its standards to that hazard.

Highway Driving

  • Cross-view back-up mirrors on delivery trucks. (1997, January 24). OSHA has no specific regulations requiring the installation of “cross-view” mirrors on delivery vehicles. At present, OSHA has no specific standards that address motor vehicle safety in general industry workplaces, including the installation of safety devices on motor vehicles. OSHA’s jurisdiction over motor vehicles is limited to vehicles operated in the workplace and not over public roads.
  • DOT has jurisdiction of the trucking industry. (1992, January 13). Establishes that the Department of Transportation (DOT) has the authority and responsibility for promulgating and enforcing regulations related to the trucking industry.

Loading and Unloading

  • Applicability of the HCS to diesel exhaust emissions and diesel fuel. (1998, December 22). Indicates that diesel exhaust emissions are not covered by the HCS. Diesel fuel however is covered by the HCS and any known hazards associated with this fuel must be reported on the material safety data sheet, including the hazards associated with the combustion of the fuel. Vehicle operators would not be covered while operating a motor vehicle, however operators would be covered while performing terminal operations.
  • Letter concerning OSHA Instruction STD 1-11.7. (1981, September 3). Determines that trucks and trailers may be secured to the dock in lieu of chocks or blocks during loading or unloading operations when using powered industrial trucks.
  • Wire rope were used as a bull wire. (1976, August 20). Discusses Rigging Equipment for Material Handling, Wire Rope, 29 CFR 1926.251(c)(3), which states that: “Wire rope shall not be secured by knots, except on haul back lines on scrapers.” In addition, if this wire rope is used as a bull wire, then 29 CFR 1926.251(c)(4)(iii) requires that the eyes in bull wires shall not be formed by knots or wire rope clips. The above standards recognize the hazard of tying knots in wire ropes used for hoisting, lowering, or pulling loads.

Transporting Hazardous Material

  • Clarification of systems for electronic access to MSDSs. (1999, February 18). Provides an explanation of the Hazard Communication Standard related to MSDSs. The mobile worksite provision allows employees who travel between worksites during the work shift to phone-in for hazard information. In this situation, employees have access to the MSDSs prior to leaving the worksite and upon returning. The telephone system, therefore, is seen as an emergency arrangement.
  • Vehicle operations on hazardous waste sites. (1992, April 2). Indicates that most of the responsibility for regulation of over-the-road vehicle operations belongs to the Department of Transportation. However, if the employer gives the truck driver responsibility to respond to emergency spills of hazardous substances or directs the driver to drive onto hazardous waste sites, then the driver is covered by OSHA’s Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response standard.
  • Emergency response in the trucking industry. (1991, April 3). Determines that each container of hazardous chemicals must be labeled, tagged or marked with the identity of the hazardous chemical, an appropriate hazard warning, and the name and address of the chemical manufacturer, importer, or other responsible party.
  • Training requirements for drivers hauling hazardous waste. (1991, June 7). Indicates that the training under 29 CFR 1910.120(q)(6) depends on the duties and functions to be performed by the truck driver. If the truck driver is expected to stop dangerous leaks and clean up the spills, then training at the hazardous materials technician or hazardous materials specialist level is appropriate.

Whistleblower Protection

Section 405 of the Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) provides protection from reprisal by employers for truckers and certain other employees in the trucking industry involved in activity related to interstate commercial motor vehicle safety and health. Secretary of Labor’s Order No. 9-83 (48 FR 35736, August 5, 1983) delegated authority to the Assistant Secretary of OSH to investigate and issue findings and preliminary orders under Section 405. The Office of Investigative Assistance has a Whistleblower Program.

Employees who believe they have been discriminated against for exercising their rights under Section 405 can file a complaint with OSHA within 180 days of the incident. The Secretary will investigate the complaint and, within 60 days after it was filed, issue findings as to whether there is a reason to believe Section 405 has been violated.

If the Secretary finds that a complaint has merit, he/she also will issue an order requiring, where appropriate, abatement of the violation, reinstatement with back pay and related compensation, payment of compensatory damages, and the payment of the employee’s expenses in bringing the complaint. Either the employee or employer may object to the findings. If no objection is filed within 30 days, the finding and order are final. If a timely filed objection is made, however, the objecting party is entitled to a hearing on the objection before an Administrative Law Judge of the Department of Labor.

Within 120 days of the hearing, the Secretary will issue a final order. A party aggrieved by the final order may seek judicial review in a court of appeals within 60 days of the final order.

The following activities that may be performed by truckers and certain employees involved in inter-state commercial motor vehicle operation are protected under Section 405:

  • Filing of safety or health complaints with OSHA or another regulatory agency relating to a violation of a commercial motor vehicle safety rule, regulation, standard, or order.
  • Instituting or causing to be instituted any proceedings relating to a violation of a commercial motor vehicle safety rule, regulation, standard, or order.
  • Testifying in any such proceedings relating to the above items.
  • Refusing to operate a vehicle when such operation constitutes a violation of any Federal rules, regulations, standards or orders applicable to commercial motor vehicle safety or health; or because of the employee’s reasonable apprehension of serious injury to himself or the public due to the unsafe condition of the equipment.
  • Complaints under Section 405 are filed in the same manner as complaints under 11(c). The filing period for Section 405 is 180 days from the alleged discrimination, rather than 30 days as under Section 11(c).

Other Federal Agencies

OSHA has jurisdiction over off-highway loading and unloading, such as warehouses, plants, grain handling facilities, retail locations, marine terminals, wharves, piers, and shipyards. The Department of Transportation (DOT) has jurisdiction over interstate highway driving, Commercial Driving Licensing (CDL), the hours of service and roadworthiness of the vehicles. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has jurisdiction over the natural environment and pollution prevention programs. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulates flight crews and some other aspects of the safety of ground crews. OSHA covers most of the working conditions of ground crews and baggage handlers. OSHA has jurisdiction unless preempted by another Federal agency such as DOT, EPA or FAA, but OSHA can only be preempted in a specified activity or task. OSHA has the ultimate responsibility for the safety and health of all employees.

These pages are part of OSHA and industry’s commitment to provide employers and trucking workers with information and assistance to help in complying with OSHA and other Federal standards to ensure a safe workplace.

The following is an overview of the regulations, training requirements, and other resources from other federal agencies:

Overview

Jurisdiction

When another Federal agency has regulated a working condition, OSHA is preempted by Section 4(b)1 from enforcing its regulations. For example:

  • The Department of Transportation (DOT) regulates driving over public highways, the health and safety of drivers involving their use of drugs and alcohol, hours of service, and use of seat belts. DOT also regulates the road worthiness of trucks and trailers and has specific requirements for the safe operation of trucks.
  • DOT has jurisdiction over interstate commerce while OSHA has jurisdiction over intrastate commerce except when handling hazardous materials. DOT has issued regulations regarding the shipping, packaging, and handling of these materials. However, if a truck driver becomes an emergency responder in the event of a spill or other disaster, then OSHA has jurisdiction.
  • The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulates flight crews and some other aspects of the safety of ground crews. If there is a clause that covers a working condition in an operational plan negotiated between the carrier and the FAA, the FAA has jurisdiction over that working condition. Otherwise, OSHA covers most of the working conditions of ground crews and baggage handlers.
  • Due to the DOT brake regulation, OSHA does not cite for failure to chock trailer wheels if a vehicle is otherwise adequately secured. DOT’s regulation preempts enforcement and DOT has jurisdiction. However, if the vehicle is an intrastate truck, OSHA has jurisdiction. Only another Federal agency may preempt OSHA’s jurisdiction.

Department of Transportation (DOT)

  • US Department of Transportation. Oversees the formulation of national transportation policy and promotes intermodal transportation. Its agencies include: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Maritime Administration (MARAD), and the US Coast Guard (USCG). The newly created Transport Security Administration (TSA) was initially part of DOT and is now part of the US Department of Homeland Security.

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)

  • Federal Highway Administration. Coordinates highway transportation programs in cooperation with states and other partners to enhance the country’s safety, economic vitality, quality of life, and the environment. Major program areas include the Federal-Aid Highway Program, which provides Federal financial assistance to the states to construct and improve the National Highway System, urban and rural roads, bridges, and the Federal Lands Highway Program, which provides access to and within national forests, national parks, Indian reservations and other public lands. The FHWA also manages a comprehensive research, development, and technology program.

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA)

  • Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Prevents commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries. On its website, it has links to its regulations and Regulatory Guidance, a series of frequently asked questions that offer detailed answers for specific situations. A self-employed independent owner-operator is covered under the FMCSRs, and defined as an “employee” unlike in OSHA Regulations where a self-employed person is not covered by the OSHA Act and is not considered an “employee”.The following is an overview of the major sections of the regulations related to driver safety and health:
  • 49 CFR 325, Compliance with interstate motor carrier noise emission standards
  • 49 CFR 350, Commercial motor carrier safety assistance program
  • 49 CFR 382, Controlled substances and alcohol use and testing
  • 49 CFR 383, Commercial driver’s license standards; requirements and penalties
  • 49 CFR 385, Safety fitness procedures
  • 49 CFR 386, Rules of practice for motor carrier safety and hazardous materials proceedings
  • 49 CFR 390, Federal motor carrier safety regulations; general
  • 49 CFR 391, Qualifications of Drivers and longer combination vehicle (LCV) driver instructions
    • 391.1, Scope of the rules in this part; additional qualifications; duties of carrier drivers
  • 49 CFR 392, Driving of Commercial Motor Vehicles. Every motor carrier, its officers, agents, representatives, and employees responsible for the management, maintenance, operation, or driving of commercial motor vehicles, or the hiring, supervising, training, assigning, or dispatching of drivers, shall be instructed in and comply with the rules in this part.
    • 392.3, Ill or fatigued operator
    • 392.4, Drugs and other substances
    • 392.5, Alcohol prohibition
    • 392.9, Inspection of cargo, cargo securement devices and systems
    • 392.10, Railroad grade crossings; stopping required
    • 392.11, Railroad grade crossing; slowing down required
    • 392.14, Hazardous conditions; extreme caution
    • 392.16, Use of seat belts
    • 392.22, Emergency signals; stopped commercial motor vehicles
    • 392.24, Emergency signals; flame-producing
    • 392.33, Obscured lamps or reflective devices/material
    • 392.50, Ignition of fuel; prevention
    • 392.60, Unauthorized persons not to be transported
    • 392.62, Safe operation, buses
    • 392.63, Towing or pushing loaded buses
    • 392.64, Riding within closed commercial motor vehicles without proper exits
    • 392.66, Carbon monoxide; use of commercial motor vehicle when detected
    • 392.67, Heater, flame-producing; on commercial motor vehicle in motion
  • 49 CFR 393, Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation. Every employer and employee shall comply and be conversant with the requirements and specifications of this part. No employer shall operate a commercial motor vehicle, or cause or permit it to be operated, unless it is equipped in accordance with the requirements and specifications of this part.
    • 393.9, Lamps operable, prohibition of obstructions of lamps and reflectors
    • 393.11, Lamps and reflective devices
    • 393.19, Hazard warning signals
    • 393.30, Battery installation
    • 393.40, Required brake systems
    • 393.41, Parking brake system
    • 393.42, Brakes required on all wheels
    • 393.43, Breakaway and emergency braking
    • 393.51, Warning signals, air pressure and vacuum gauges
    • 393.65, All fuel systems
    • 393.67, Liquid fuel tanks
    • 393.69, Liquefied petroleum gas systems
    • 393.100, Which types of commercial motor vehicles are subject to the cargo securement standards of this subpart, and what general requirements apply?
    • 393.102, What are the minimum performance criteria for cargo securement devices and systems?
    • 393.104, What standards must cargo securement devices and systems meet in order to satisfy the requirements of this subpart?
    • 393.205, Wheels
  • 49 CFR 395, Hours of Service of Drivers
    • 395.1, Scope of rules in this part
    • 395.3, Maximum driving time for property-carrying vehicles
  • 49 CFR 396, Inspection, Repair, and Maintenance. Every motor carrier, its officers, drivers, agents, representatives, and employees directly concerned with the inspection or maintenance of motor vehicles shall comply and be conversant with the rules of this part.
  • 49 CFR 399, Employee Safety and Health Standards. Prescribes step, handhold, and deck requirements on commercial motor vehicles. These requirements are intended to enhance the safety of motor carrier employees.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

  • Federal Aviation Administration. Oversees the safety of civil aviation. It also regulates a program to protect the security of civil aviation, and enforces regulations under the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act for shipments by air.
  • Part 139 Airport Certification. In 2004, FAA issued a final rule that revised the Federal airport certification regulation 14 CFR Part 139 and established certification requirements for airports serving scheduled air carrier operations in aircraft designed for more than 9 passenger seats but less than 31 passenger seats. In addition, this final rule amended a section of an air carrier operation regulation 14 CFR Part 121 so it would conform with changes to airport certification requirements. The revised Federal airport certification requirements went into effect on June 9, 2004.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

  • Environmental Protection Agency. Protects human health and safeguards the natural environment – air, water, and land – upon which life depends. The EPA also works with industries and all levels of government in a variety of voluntary pollution prevention programs and energy conservation efforts.
    • Environmental Screening Checklist and Workbook for the Trucking Industry [655 KB PDF, 103 pages]. (2000, August). Includes a checklist and workbook which may be used to evaluate a facility’s compliance with Federal environmental regulations applicable to the trucking industry. The term “facility” refers to, but is not limited to, trucking terminals, truck maintenance shops, etc., that are overseen by owners/operators, managers, field personnel, etc., who engage in trucking operations.
    • Profile of the Ground Transportation Industry: Railroad, Trucking, and Pipeline [1 MB PDF, 134 pages]. Office of Compliance Sector Notebook Project, (1997, September). Presents comprehensive, common sense environmental protection measures for the trucking industry. For the purposes of this project, the key elements included are: general industry information (economic and geographic); a description of industrial processes; pollution outputs; pollution prevention opportunities; Federal statutory and regulatory framework; compliance history; and a description of partnerships that have been formed between regulatory agencies, the regulated community and the public.The trucking industry includes establishments engaged in motor freight transportation and warehousing. This includes local and long-distance trucking or transfer services, and establishments engaged in the storage of farm products, furniture, and other household goods, or commercial goods of any kind. For the purpose of this notebook, the trucking industry also includes the operation of terminal facilities for handling freight, both those with and without maintenance facilities. The trucking SIC sectors covered in this notebook are shown in the following table.
SIC 42 – MOTOR FREIGHT TRANSPORTATION & WAREHOUSING
4212 Local Trucking Without Storage
4213 Trucking, Except Local
4214 Local Trucking With Storage
4215 Courier Services, Except by Air
4221 Farm Product Warehousing & Storage
4222 Refrigerated Warehousing & Storage
4225 General Warehousing & Storage
4226 Special Warehousing & Storage, NEC (Not Elsewhere Classified)
4231 Terminal & Joint Terminal Maintenance Facilities for Motor Freight Transportation

Industry Hazards

Workers in the trucking industry experienced the the most fatalities of all occupations, accounting for 12 percent of all worker deaths. About two-thirds of fatally injured truckers were involved in highway crashes. Truck drivers also had more nonfatal injuries than workers in any other occupation. Half of the nonfatal injuries were serious sprains and strains; this may be attributed to the fact that many truck drivers must unload the goods they transport.

Specific OSHA, Department of Transportation (DOT), and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations, training requirements, hazard references and illness and injury statistics that apply to the major trucking activities of employers and their employees are included in the following pages:

Related Safety and Health Info

Roughly 475,000 large trucks with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds are involved in crashes which result in approximately 5,360 fatalities and 142,000 injuries each year. Of the fatalities, about 74 percent were occupants of other vehicles (usually passenger cars), 3 percent were pedestrians, and 23 percent were occupants of large trucks. The unsafe actions of automobile drivers are a contributing factor in about 70 percent of the fatal crashes involving trucks. More public awareness of how to share the road safely with large trucks is needed. Safe speeds save lives. Exceeding the speed limit was a factor in 22 percent of the fatal crashes. Greater speed enforcement is needed.

The following information is related to safety and health in the trucking industry:

Trucker Illnesses and Injuries

Common Trucker Injuries

  • Strains and sprains (50 percent)
  • Bruises
  • Fractures
  • Cuts and lacerations
  • Soreness and pain
  • Multiple traumatic injuries

Events or Exposures Leading

  • Overexertion
  • Contact with object
  • Being struck by an object
  • Falling (on the same level)
  • Transportation accidents

Fatality and Injury

  • Large Truck Crash Facts 2000 [248 KB PDF, 61 pages]. Analysis Division of Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association (FMCSA), (2002, March). Reports that over the past 20 years (1980 to 2000), there has been a 39 percent increase in registered large trucks and a 90 percent increase in miles traveled by large trucks. Over the same time period, the number of large trucks involved in fatal crashes each year has declined by 8 percent, and the vehicle involvement rate for large trucks in fatal crashes has declined by 52 percent.
  • Put the Brakes on Fatalities Day: October 10. American Society of Civil Engineers. Indicates that according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) early projections, the number of traffic fatalities fell three percent between 2009 and 2010, from 33,808 to 32,788. Since 2005, fatalities have dropped 25 percent, from a total of 43,510 fatalities in 2005. The same estimates also project that the fatality rate will be the lowest recorded since 1949, with 1.09 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled, down from the 1.13 fatality rate for 2009. The decrease in fatalities for 2010 occurred despite an estimated increase of nearly 21 billion miles in national vehicle miles traveled.
  • Fatalities and Injuries Among Truck and Taxicab Drivers [36 KB PDF, 7 pages]. Knestaut, A. Compensation and Working Conditions, (1997, Fall). Identifies truck driving (From 1992 to 1995) as having the most fatalities of all occupations, accounting for 12 percent of all worker deaths. About two-thirds of the fatally injured truckers were involved in highway crashes. Truck drivers also had more nonfatal injuries (over 151,000) than workers in any other occupation in 1995. Half of the nonfatal injuries were serious sprains and strains; this may be attributed to the fact that many truck drivers must unload the goods they transport.

Serious Violations Cited 1997-2002

  • Improper guarding of grinding machinery
  • Lack of eyewashes and showers
  • Unsafe forklifts
  • Grounding of electrical equipment
  • Lack of personal protective equipment
  • No guardrails on platforms or loading docks

General Trucking Safety

Over the past 20 years (1983 to 2003), there has been a 44-percent increase in registered large trucks and an 86-percent increase in large truck miles traveled. Many workers are at high risk of injury and death from traffic-related motor vehicle crashes. About three workers die from these crashes each day.

  • Large Trucks [315 KB PDF, 6 pages]. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), National Center for Statistics and Analysis. Reports that in 2004, 416,000 large trucks (gross vehicle weight rating greater than 10,000 pounds) were involved in traffic crashes in the United States; 4,862 were involved in fatal crashes. A total of 5,190 people died (12% of all the traffic fatalities reported in 2004) and an additional 116,000 were injured in those crashes. In 2003, large trucks accounted for 3 percent of all registered vehicles and 7 percent of total vehicle miles traveled (2004 registered vehicle and vehicle miles traveled data not available). In 2004, large trucks accounted for 8 percent of all vehicles involved in fatal crashes and 4 percent of all vehicles involved in injury and property-damage-only crashes. One out of eight traffic fatalities in 2004 resulted from a collision involving a large truck.
  • Commercial Driver’s License Program (CDL/CDLIS). Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Identifies the goal of the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 (which was signed into law on October 27, 1986) as improvement of highway safety by ensuring that drivers of large trucks and buses are qualified to operate those vehicles and to remove unsafe and unqualified drivers from the highways. The Act retained the state’s right to issue a driver’s license, but established minimum national standards that states must meet when licensing CMV drivers.
  • Work-Related Roadway Crashes: Challenges and Opportunities for Prevention. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2003-119, (2003, September). Provides a comprehensive overview of crash data, the regulatory environment, and risk factors that contribute to workplace crashes. Identifies the groups of workers at greatest risk of traffic crashes, summarizes key issues that contribute to work-related roadway crashes, and recommends preventive measures for employers and other stakeholders.
  • US Department of Transportation (DOT). The information below provides links to the primary safety sites within the DOT. Truckers are an integral part of the movement of materials between air, land, and sea.

Air

  • Safety. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Develops and implements improved tools and processes to facilitate more effective use of safety data, both inside and outside the agency, to help improve aviation safety.

Land

  • Reducing Highway Fatalities. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). Reports nationally, in 2011, 32,885 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes in the United States – the lowest number of deaths since 1949 (30,246 fatalities in 1949). In addition, 2010 saw the lowest fatality and injury rates ever recorded: 1.10 deaths per 100 million vehicle miles traveled in 2010, compared to 1.13 deaths for 2009. The number of people injured in motor vehicle crashes in 2010 declined for a 11th straight year in a row, falling an estimated 2.9 percent from 2009.
  • Driving Safety. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Provides information on distracted driving, driver education, and occupant protection among other topics.
  • Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Safety Analysis. Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). Makes available railroad safety information including accidents and incidents, inspections and highway-rail crossing data. Users can run dynamic queries, download a variety of safety database files, publications and forms, and view current statistical information on railroad safety.

Sea

  • Marine Safety Center. US Coast Guard (USCG). Works directly with the marine industry, the Commandant, and Coast Guard field units in the evaluation and approval of commercial vessel and systems designs, development of safety standards and policies, response to maritime casualties and oversight of delegated third parties in support of the Coast Guard’s marine safety and environmental protection programs. The US Coast Guard in now part of the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS).
  • Stress Factors Experienced by Female Commercial Drivers in the Transportation Industry. Electronic Library of Construction Occupational Health & Safety (elcosh). Reports that according to 1998 occupational injury and illness data compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), truck drivers, as compared to other occupations, experienced the largest number of injuries and illnesses with time away from work over the latest five years for which data is available (1992-1996). During this time, the number of injuries and illnesses declined for all occupations by about 20 percent, but the number increased by nearly five percent (up to 151,300) for truck drivers, with women accounting for 17.6 percent.
  • A Summary – Improving Safety. US Department of Transportation (DOT). Summarizes the Driver and Vehicle Safety Programs authorized by TEA-21, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, including the alcohol programs, seat belt and occupant protection programs, state and community grants, state highway safety data Improvement Incentive Grants, Highway Safety Research and Development, National Driver Register, Automobile Safety and Information, and for Railway-Highway Crossings-Operation Lifesaver, Motor Carrier Safety programs, as well as other infrastructure programs.
  • U.S. Transportation Secretary Mineta Announces FMCSA Rule Permitting Performance Brake Testing Technology. US Department of Transportation (DOT), (2002, August). Allows motor carriers and federal, state, and local enforcement officials to use performance-based brake tests to determine whether a truck or bus complies with brake performance safety standards. PBBTs are expected to save time and their use could increase the number of CMVs that can be inspected in a given time. The new rule applies to all CMVs and CMV combinations weighing over 10,000 pounds, and is effective on February 5, 2003. The docket number for the final rule is FHWA-1999-6266.

OSHA Publications

  • Longshoring Industry [492 KB PDF*, 291 pages]. OSHA Publication 2232, (Revised 2001). Contains standards related to the longshoring industry.

OSHA Slide Presentations and Handouts

  • Health and Safety of Truckers within the United States [852 KB PPT*, 21 slides]. OSHA Slide Presentation, (2002, May 31). Describes OSHA’s role in worker protection, common trucker injuries and OSHA violations, OSHA and DOT jurisdiction, and how OSHA addresses trucker hazards. Presented at the OSHA North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Land Transport Conference.

Emergency and Disaster Response Links

Unforeseen emergencies and disasters can threaten your employees, customers, or the public; they can disrupt or shut down operations or cause major physical or environmental damage. Trucking employers need to plan for these events.

Some useful related links are:

  • DisasterAssistance. Supports a multitude of Federal Agency missions including FEMA’s mission to reduce the loss of life and property and protect our institutions from all hazards. The partnerships established will support the Federal mission to provide the nation a comprehensive, risk-based emergency management program of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.
  • National Hurricane Center. National Weather Service. Informs the public about the hurricane hazards and provide knowledge which can be used to take action. This information can be used to save lives at work, home, while on the road, or on the water.
  • Natural Hazards Center. The University of Colorado at Boulder. Serves as a national and international clearinghouse of knowledge concerning the social science and policy aspects of disasters. The Center collects and shares research and experience related to preparedness for, response to, recovery from, and mitigation of disasters, emphasizing the link between hazards mitigation and sustainability to both producers and users of research and knowledge on extreme events.
  • Road Transportation. Transport Canada. Includes links to safety pages, to information for drivers and motor carriers, to infrastructure and to the transport of dangerous goods.
  • Office of Hazardous Materials Safety. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). Formulates, issues and revises Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) under the Federal Hazardous Materials Transportation Law. The HMR cover hazardous materials definitions and classifications, hazard communications, shipper and carrier operations, training and security requirements, and packaging and container specifications.

Additional Information

Training

Departments of Motor Vehicle (DMV) and Departments of Transportation (DOT)

State websites provide information on road conditions, weather, construction, weights and measures, and commercial vehicle enforcement. Also, many state DOT offices offer safety training programs. Live cameras provide on-line views of current road conditions.

The following are links to major state department websites related to transportation:

Academic

Many of the following educational institutions have institutes dedicated to transportation studies:

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