“House Fires Caused By Storage of 9 Volt, AA Batteries In Junk Drawers & Other Places Rising”

* If You Know of a Fire Incident in Your Town Caused by 9 Volt, AA or AAA Battery Storage in a Home, Please Note it in the comments Section of this Post! Thank You!

Click here for the recent Hastings, Nebraska House Fire on January 16, 2017

If you are storing loose 9 volt or AA or other batteries in a kitchen drawer or a “junk” drawer in your home, watch how you store them. Above all don’t store them loose and rolling around with other metal items, like small tools, paper clips, nails and more of the lovely mix of things we keep in our junk drawers. You also don’t want them loose and rolling around in other items like a camera case, luggage, etc.

All you need to have happened is for a metal object like steel wool or a paper clip short out across the top of a 9-volt battery and ignite paper or other easily ignited materials and you’ll have a potential disaster in your home. As indicated in the YouTube Video below, it doesn’t take much to heat a metallic object or cause a spark in order to start a fire. *Please Do Not Do This At Home*

What to do with a 9 Volt Battery

I teach safety to the public, common sense tells most of us what to do in situations that could become life threatening. I speak to 50-60 people at a time about fire safety in the home on a monthly basis. I get the same reaction from every group when I hold up a 9-volt battery and announce that it is a fire hazard and it could burn down your house.

They all kinda look at me funny, as if to ask, “Did you just say a 9-volt battery could burn down my house?” That look is almost comical.

Q: Where do you store your batteries?

A: Throw them in  in a “junk” drawer

I then hold up a brillo pad. (just one example)

Q: What do you do with the batteries when you are done with them?

A: Throw them in the trash.

A 9-volt battery (see video) is a fire hazard because the positive and negative posts are on top, right next to one another. If this comes in contact with anything metal (aluminum foil, brillo, etc…) it will spark, and if there is a fuel for this spark you will have a fire. (fire needs heat, fuel and oxygen to burn) To test this theory, put a 9-volt battery or a couple of AA batteries in your pocket with some loose change or your key chain full of keys, (use common sense) this will bring on a whole new meaning to the words, Hot Pants.

When you dispose of this type of battery (positive and negative on top) Make sure it is safely wrapped in electrical tape or something to keep it separated from anything else that may come in contact with it. A small box or zip lock bag if kept in a junk drawer should suffice.  I have seen in some stores now that the manufacturers are now packaging them with plastic caps. If you need to purchase a 9-volt battery try to find those that are packaged in this manner.

Try to be just as diligent with AA or AAA batteries. Keep them in their original packaging if stored in a “junk drawer”. Don’t let them roll around freely with all the other wonderful miscellaneous items we unknowingly toss in the drawer and don’t think twice about it.

 

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CSB Investigation Warns of Dust Explosion Risk at Recycling Facilities

CSB Com Dust Al Solutions 2010

The U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) has released its final report, safety recommendations and accompanying safety video into a fatal combustible dust explosion at the AL Solutions metal recycling facility in New Cumberland, West Virginia.

As presented to the Board for a vote at a public meeting in Charleston, the report reiterates a recommendation that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) promulgate a general industry combustible dust standard, which CSB said it has been calling for since its 2006 study on these preventable accidents.

The December 9, 2010 accident at the AL Solutions metal recycling facility, which milled and processed scrap titanium and zirconium metal, killed three employees and injured a contractor.

The CSB said that the incident is one of nine serious combustible dust incidents investigated by the CSB since 2003. These explosions and fires caused 36 deaths and 128 injuries.

According to the CSB’s report, most solid organic materials, as well as many metals, will explode if the particles are small enough, and they are dispersed in a sufficient concentration within a confined area, near an ignition source.

The report emphasised to industry that even seemingly small amounts of accumulated combustible dust can cause catastrophic damage.

The CSB investigation determined that AL Solutions experienced a history of fatal dust fires and explosions.

A newly developed CSB safety video entitled ‘Combustible Dust: Solutions Delayed’ details the process of milling and blending metal powder at the facility which was then pressed into dense disk called ‘compacts’.

“The CSB learned that the AL Solutions facility had fatal fires and explosions involving metal dust in 1995 and 2006 in addition to the 2010 explosion. Also, from 1993 until the accident in 2010, there were at least seven fires that required responses from the local fire department,” explained investigator Mark Wingard.

Around 1:20 pm on 9 December 2010, CSB said that a spark or hot-spot from the blender likely ignited the zirconium powder inside. The resulting flash fire lofted the metal dust particles in the blender, forming a burning metal dust cloud.

The cloud ignited other combustible dust within the production building, causing a secondary explosion that ripped through the plant, killing three workers and injuring a contract employee.

“Preventable combustible dust explosions continue to occur, causing worker deaths and injuries. The CSB believes it is imperative for OSHA to  issue a comprehensive combustible dust standard for general industry with clear control requirements to prevent dust fires and explosions,” commented chairperson Rafael Moure-Eras.

In presenting the findings of the case study, CSB’s lead investigator, Johnnie Banks, said: “As the metals were broken down during milling, the risk of a metal dust fire or explosion increased as the metal particles decreased in size.

“At AL Solutions a metal blender used to process zirconium was having mechanical problems that had not been adequately repaired. As a result, the blender was producing heat or sparks due to metal-to-metal contact.”

Investigator Wingard added: “The National Fire Protection Association Standard for Combustible Metals, called NFPA 484, recommends specific practices for controlling metal dust, but AL Solutions did not voluntarily follow those guidelines, and there are no federal OSHA standards to enforce similar requirements.

“In its 2006 Combustible Dust Hazard Study, the CSB recommended that OSHA issue a combustible dust standard for general industry based on the current NFPA guidelines.”

The CSB’s report and video encourage industry to take action to prevent combustible dust incidents.  In July 2013, the CSB identified its 2006 recommendation to develop a combustible dust standard as the first issue in its ‘Most Wanted Chemical Safety Improvement’ outreach program.

According to Moure-Eraso, had a national standard for combustible dust been in place in 2006 – and if industry had followed the requirements – many of the severe dust incidents that followed, including AL Solutions, may have been prevented.

“The time is now for OSHA to take action to prevent these tragic accidents,” he urged.

The CSB is an independent federal agency charged with investigating industrial chemical accidents. The agency’s board members are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate.

AL Solutions Fatal Dust Explosion
FINAL REPORT: AL Solutions
Location: New Cumberland, WV
Accident Occurred On: 12/09/2010
Final Report Released On: 07/16/2014
Accident Type: Combustible Dust Explosion and Fire
Company Name: AL Solutions
Accident Description
An explosion ripped through the New Cumberland A.L. Solutions titanium plant in West Virginia on December 9, 2010, fatally injuring three workers. The workers were processing titanium powder, which is highly flammable, at the time of the explosion.

Investigation Status
The CSB’s final report was approved 2-0 at a public meeting in Charleston, WV.

These People Whip Out Their Phones In A Movie Theater. They Never Saw It Coming! (Re-Posted Due to High Demand)

Here at EHS Safety News, we love stories that make a powerful point. This is just that. In less than 2 minutes, these movie goers will get an unexpected surprise. People really need to learn the true consequences of this message.

How do you think you would have reacted to this? Comment below!

OSHA Publishes Direct Final Rule On Standards Update To Rules On Signage

Understanding OSHA’s Safety Sign Standards Update

For decades, OSHA’s regulations for workplace safety signs were based on outdated formats that were not aligned with the latest safety communication standards and their state-of-the-art warnings technology. These sign and tag regulations had not been updated since their inception in 1971, which referenced the 1967 and 1968 versions of the USASI Z53 and Z35 standards. But, in September 2013, new OSHA regulations went into effect. OSHA updated its regulations to incorporate the latest ANSI Z535 (2011) standards, effective September 11, 2013. This regulation change is an opportunity for organizations to rethink and elevate visual safety communication in the workplace.

Clarion’s Role in Championing the Latest Advances in Visual Safety

Clarion’s CEO, Geoffrey Peckham, who also serves as chair of the ANSI Z535 Committee for Safety Signs and Colors and chair and delegation head for ANSI to the ISO standards pertaining to safety signs, has spearheaded this update to OSHA’s consensus standards. His goal has been to better align OSHA with the latest advances in safety sign technology. Read our Issue Brief to learn more.

What This Means For Workplace Safety Signs and Tags

With OSHA’s regulatory update, organizations can now utilize the advances in warnings technology established in the ANSI Z535 standards for facility safety signs and tags – and be in compliance with OSHA. Prior to the rule change, facility owners using ANSI Z535 signs or tags would run the risk of being cited for violating OSHA standards because the OSHA standards only referenced the old 1967-68 standards (called a “de minimus situation”). This rule update allows employers to use either the old or new standards. For existing signage, OSHA will grandfather signs that comply with its current requirements. For new signage, OSHA will allow use of safety signs and tags that are compliant with either the old or new USASI/ANSI standards.

Why the New Standards Are Better

Most safety signs and tags in use today are based on antiquated, 70-year-old designs that lack the warnings technology incorporated into modern safety sign standards. They also fail to meet the demands of an increasingly global workforce with multiple language needs. The 2011 ANSI Z535 standards have many safety communication benefits as compared with older versions. These standards incorporate the past 70+ years of advances that have taken place in safety sign technology. As such, their use in workplaces is a significant step forward in improving safety and better protecting workers of all backgrounds.

Benefits of Using the Latest ANSI Z535 Signs and Tags
  • The new signs and tags typically provide a more substantial level of information so people can make safer decisions (such as the nature of the hazard, the consequence of interaction with the hazard, and how to avoid the hazard).
  • The concepts contained in the ANSI Z535 standards are supported by human factors research on effective warnings and by modern risk assessment methodologies.
  • The newer formats better accommodate multiple language panels and graphical symbol panels so safety is better communicated to non-English readers.
  • The ANSI Z535 standards contain design principles that exemplify current legal criteria for “adequate warnings” as defined by the past thirty years of U.S. case law.
  • See Updated Information here:
  • http://www.clarionsafety.com/OSHA-Signage-Update

__________________________________

Clarion Safety Systems, a longstanding leader in advancing best practices in visual safety communication, announced today that its efforts to promote the use of industry best practices related to safety signs, colors and tags to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has resulted in the agency issuing a Direct Final Rule (DFR) on a proposed update to its regulations on signage. If no significant adverse public comments on the DFR are received by July 15, 2013, the agency’s next step will be to confirm the effective date of the rule.

Clarion’s CEO, Geoffrey Peckham, who also serves as chair of the ANSI Z535 Committee for Safety Signs and Colors and chair and delegation head for ANSI to the ISO standards pertaining to safety signs, has championed this update to OSHA’s standards to better align with the latest advances in safety sign technology. Over the last four years, together with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, Peckham has lobbied OSHA to recognize that the American National Standards Institute’s ANSI Z535 series of standards for safety colors, signs and tags provide an equal or greater level of safety as compared to the 1967-68 USASI Z53 and Z35 standards that are presently referenced in OSHA’s regulations.

“At Clarion, workers’ lives and livelihoods matter. In our view, OSHA’s proposed update marks a significant step towards advancing workplace safety with effective signage,” says Deb Patterson, President of Clarion Safety Systems. “Our comprehensive knowledge of the latest standards coupled with our practical experience applying them across industries brings our clients best practice products. We know that there’s a better way to warn than what’s present in most workplaces around the country. It’s why we have been such strong advocates of OSHA’s adoption of the ANSI Z535 standards; safety signage, when done well, reduces risk and protects people.”

According to OSHA, the goal of the safety sign rulemaking update is to improve workplace safety and health by allowing employers to use the latest consensus safety sign standards (ANSI Z535) in order to take advantage of the safety communication benefits that the newer standards represent. When compared to the older 1967-1968 standards, the ANSI Z535 standards are considered the state-of-the-art because they have the following characteristics:

  • Provide critical information viewers need in order to make safe decisions, such as the nature of the hazard, the consequence of interaction with the hazard, and how to avoid the hazard
  • Are supported by human factors research on effective warnings and by modern risk assessment methodologies for accurately communicating hazard severity
  • Have the ability to use multiple language panels and graphical symbol panels to communicate safety to non-English speaking workers
  • Meet current legal criteria for “adequate warnings” as defined by the past thirty years of U.S. case law

Most employers currently use signs that comply with the older 1967-1968 standards. Because OSHA aimed to avoid creating an economic burden to employers, the older 1967-1968 standards will continue to be referenced in OSHA’s regulations. However, the corresponding ANSI Z535-2011 reference will be placed next to the older reference. For instance, whenever the OSHA standards reference the 1968 USASI Z35.1 Standard for Accident Prevention Signs, the 2011 ANSI Z535.2 Standard for Environmental and Facility Safety Signs will also be referenced. In effect, this will allow employers to use safety signs that comply with either the old or the new standards.

Prior to this rule change, employers using the newer ANSI Z535 standards for their signage would run the risk of being cited for violating OSHA standards. The outcome of this violation would not result in a fine due to the fact that the ANSI Z535 standards are the current version of the document that was used as the basis for OSHA’s safety sign regulations. Called a “de minimus situation,” this provision provides little incentive for employers to adopt the latest industry best practices with regards to safety signs, colors and tags. The new rule that incorporates ANSI Z535 safety sign, color and tag references into OSHA standards eliminates this problem, allowing employers to use the ANSI Z535 standards without the possibility of a citation.

“OSHA’s commitment to uphold the advances that have taken place in safety sign technology is a step forward in improving safety, reducing compliance uncertainty, and better protecting workers of all backgrounds,” says Peckham. “This is an opportunity for organizations to elevate visual safety communication in their workplaces. Safety and risk-conscious companies understand that, when it comes to zero harm and accident prevention, your workers, your company and your industry will be best served by utilizing the advances in warnings technology established in the ANSI Z535 standards. Industry leaders who already have a strong culture can now utilize signage that reflects their values in their facilities – and be in compliance with OSHA.”

To help safety advocates to learn more about the ANSI standards, as part of its comprehensive library of short, educational videos designed to promote a better understanding of current best practices in product safety labeling and facility sign systems, Clarion has produced a video titled, “ANSI Standards in Safety Signs and Labels.” The video is available through the Clarion website’s video library as well as through the company’s YouTube channel.

Clarion specializes in bringing companies up-to-date with the latest warnings technology and produces a product line of best practice, standards-compliant facility safety sign systems. Additional information is available by contacting the company or visiting http://www.clarionsafety.com.

ABOUT CLARION SAFETY SYSTEMS
Clarion Safety Systems, LLC, is the leading designer and manufacturer of visual safety solutions that help customers in more than 180 industries worldwide to make their products and premises safer. Clarion offers a full range of standard and custom products including machinery safety labels, environmental and facility safety signs, pipe and valve identification markings, lockout/tagout products, and safety-grade photoluminescent egress path-marking escape systems. Founded in 1990, the company continues to play a leading role in the development and writing of international and national standards for safety signs, labels, and markings. Clarion is headquartered at 190 Old Milford Road in Milford, PA, 18337, and online at http://www.clarionsafety.com.

Clarion CEO Geoffrey Peckham’s ongoing leadership efforts in bolstering adoption by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of the Updated American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) Standards leads to direct final rule on Consensus Standard Update on Signage, Marking Important Advancement in Workplace Safety.

Off Topic Fun: “Husband Sees Wife After Surgery…..Again”

Anesthesia Can Do Funny Things! 🙂

Please support us by helping to bring these children home:
http://www.gofundme.com/mortensenfami…
Our Story:
http://mortensenadopt.wordpress.com/
Twitter:
https://twitter.com/JasonMortensen
To see some of our interviews, photo’s and things we are passionate about, check out our Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jason-…

In response to all of the questions: I had a hernia repair to fix residual tears from a previous surgery. I wish I could remember this but I was definitely out of it. This was my fifth surgery within our six years of marriage and she’s been by my side through all of it.

In a previous surgery I suffered a severe complication and we didn’t know if I’d ever function the same again. She is the love of my life. Glad everyone is enjoying the video.

If you Ever Have Surgery, Here’s Some Post Operation Information

General Surgery Post-Operative Instructions

The following instructions will provide helpful information that will assist your recovery. These are designed to be general guidelines. Remember, everyone recovers differently. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your doctor.

Pain Medication

  • You will be given a prescription for a pain medicine after surgery, usually a pill called Vicodin or Percocet.
  • Please follow the direction on the label.
  • Do not drive while taking pain medication.
  • Do not take pain medication on an empty stomach. This may make you nauseated.
  • Use a stool softener or gentle laxative (such as Dulcolax suppository, or pill), as constipation is not uncommon with some pain medication.
  • If you no longer need your prescribed pain medication, you may take over the counter pain medication such as Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Advil (ibuprofen) for pain.
  • Refer to the medication instructions on the form titled “Medication Reconciliation” provided by the hospital.

Activity

  • If at all possible, have someone with you to help you at all times.
  • You may resume your pre-operative level of activity 24 hours after surgery.
  • Going up stairs is not a problem.
  • Listen to your body and rest when you are tired.
  • Do not lift anything heavy (over 15 pounds) or as directed by your physician.
  • Do not drive a motor vehicle; operate machinery or power tools for 24 hours or while taking pain medications.

Diet

  • Advance to your diet as directed by your physician slowly over the next day or two.
  • Do not drink alcohol in the immediate postoperative period while taking pain medication.

Wound Care

  • If you have a clear see-through bandage over the incision, you may take a shower. The bandage is waterproof.
    • It is not uncommon for some reddish fluid to accumulate under the plastic bandage. This is no cause for alarm.
    • The clear see-through bandage may be removed after 3 days. It is ok to leave it on until follow up with your physician.
  • If you have a gauze bandage over the incision, you may remove it in 48 hours. At that time you may shower.
  • If you have narrow white tape strips over the incision (steri-strips), keep them dry for 48 hours. Do not remove them unless they are curling up at the side and almost falling off (if you remove them sooner, you risk pulling the incision apart). You may then shower.
  • Staples or sutures are generally removed in 7-14 days.
  • Many incisions will have buried absorbable sutures, which do not need to be removed.

Showering

  • Showers should be quick (5 minutes long).
  • Do not soak in the bathtub until instructed by your doctor.

Drain Care

  • If you have a drain, record the time and amount of drainage on a piece of paper. Empty the drain every few hours or as needed. The nurse will explain how the drain works before you are discharged from the hospital.

Call Your Doctor If:

  • Your temperature is 101°F or higher. It is not uncommon to have a low-grade fever after surgery.
  • You have new redness around the incision or if pus drains from the incision.
  • Severe bleeding occurs. Apply direct pressure to the area.
  • Severe abdominal pain, vomiting, or jaundice occurs (yellow tint to eyes or skin).
  • If you cannot get in touch with your doctor, call or go to the East Jefferson General Hospital Emergency Room at (504) 454-4377.
  • Call 911 in an emergency.

Follow-Up:

  • Please make your follow-up appointment by calling the office or as instructed by your physician. Most appointments are for 7-14 days following your surgery. If you have any problems before then, do not hesitate to call.
Attachments:
Click here for printable pdf version 80 Kb

 

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OSHA Publishes Direct Final Rule on Standards Update to Rules on Signage

Clarion Safety Systems, a longstanding leader in advancing best practices in visual safety communication, announced today that its efforts to promote the use of industry best practices related to safety signs, colors and tags to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has resulted in the agency issuing a Direct Final Rule (DFR) on a proposed update to its regulations on signage. If no significant adverse public comments on the DFR are received by July 15, 2013, the agency’s next step will be to confirm the effective date of the rule.

Clarion’s CEO, Geoffrey Peckham, who also serves as chair of the ANSI Z535 Committee for Safety Signs and Colors and chair and delegation head for ANSI to the ISO standards pertaining to safety signs, has championed this update to OSHA’s standards to better align with the latest advances in safety sign technology. Over the last four years, together with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, Peckham has lobbied OSHA to recognize that the American National Standards Institute’s ANSI Z535 series of standards for safety colors, signs and tags provide an equal or greater level of safety as compared to the 1967-68 USASI Z53 and Z35 standards that are presently referenced in OSHA’s regulations.

“At Clarion, workers’ lives and livelihoods matter. In our view, OSHA’s proposed update marks a significant step towards advancing workplace safety with effective signage,” says Deb Patterson, President of Clarion Safety Systems. “Our comprehensive knowledge of the latest standards coupled with our practical experience applying them across industries brings our clients best practice products. We know that there’s a better way to warn than what’s present in most workplaces around the country. It’s why we have been such strong advocates of OSHA’s adoption of the ANSI Z535 standards; safety signage, when done well, reduces risk and protects people.”

According to OSHA, the goal of the safety sign rulemaking update is to improve workplace safety and health by allowing employers to use the latest consensus safety sign standards (ANSI Z535) in order to take advantage of the safety communication benefits that the newer standards represent. When compared to the older 1967-1968 standards, the ANSI Z535 standards are considered the state-of-the-art because they have the following characteristics:

  • Provide critical information viewers need in order to make safe decisions, such as the nature of the hazard, the consequence of interaction with the hazard, and how to avoid the hazard
  • Are supported by human factors research on effective warnings and by modern risk assessment methodologies for accurately communicating hazard severity
  • Have the ability to use multiple language panels and graphical symbol panels to communicate safety to non-English speaking workers
  • Meet current legal criteria for “adequate warnings” as defined by the past thirty years of U.S. case law

Most employers currently use signs that comply with the older 1967-1968 standards. Because OSHA aimed to avoid creating an economic burden to employers, the older 1967-1968 standards will continue to be referenced in OSHA’s regulations. However, the corresponding ANSI Z535-2011 reference will be placed next to the older reference. For instance, whenever the OSHA standards reference the 1968 USASI Z35.1 Standard for Accident Prevention Signs, the 2011 ANSI Z535.2 Standard for Environmental and Facility Safety Signs will also be referenced. In effect, this will allow employers to use safety signs that comply with either the old or the new standards.

Prior to this rule change, employers using the newer ANSI Z535 standards for their signage would run the risk of being cited for violating OSHA standards. The outcome of this violation would not result in a fine due to the fact that the ANSI Z535 standards are the current version of the document that was used as the basis for OSHA’s safety sign regulations. Called a “de minimus situation,” this provision provides little incentive for employers to adopt the latest industry best practices with regards to safety signs, colors and tags. The new rule that incorporates ANSI Z535 safety sign, color and tag references into OSHA standards eliminates this problem, allowing employers to use the ANSI Z535 standards without the possibility of a citation.

“OSHA’s commitment to uphold the advances that have taken place in safety sign technology is a step forward in improving safety, reducing compliance uncertainty, and better protecting workers of all backgrounds,” says Peckham. “This is an opportunity for organizations to elevate visual safety communication in their workplaces. Safety and risk-conscious companies understand that, when it comes to zero harm and accident prevention, your workers, your company and your industry will be best served by utilizing the advances in warnings technology established in the ANSI Z535 standards. Industry leaders who already have a strong culture can now utilize signage that reflects their values in their facilities – and be in compliance with OSHA.”

To help safety advocates to learn more about the ANSI standards, as part of its comprehensive library of short, educational videos designed to promote a better understanding of current best practices in product safety labeling and facility sign systems, Clarion has produced a video titled, “ANSI Standards in Safety Signs and Labels.” The video is available through the Clarion website’s video library as well as through the company’s YouTube channel.

Clarion specializes in bringing companies up-to-date with the latest warnings technology and produces a product line of best practice, standards-compliant facility safety sign systems. Additional information is available by contacting the company or visiting http://www.clarionsafety.com.

ABOUT CLARION SAFETY SYSTEMS
Clarion Safety Systems, LLC, is the leading designer and manufacturer of visual safety solutions that help customers in more than 180 industries worldwide to make their products and premises safer. Clarion offers a full range of standard and custom products including machinery safety labels, environmental and facility safety signs, pipe and valve identification markings, lockout/tagout products, and safety-grade photoluminescent egress path-marking escape systems. Founded in 1990, the company continues to play a leading role in the development and writing of international and national standards for safety signs, labels, and markings. Clarion is headquartered at 190 Old Milford Road in Milford, PA, 18337, and online at http://www.clarionsafety.com.

Clarion CEO Geoffrey Peckham’s ongoing leadership efforts in bolstering adoption by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of the Updated American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) Standards leads to direct final rule on Consensus Standard Update on Signage, Marking Important Advancement in Workplace Safety.

90 Minutes About OSHA Most People Have Never Seen

We’ve always known OSHA as the official authority of safety and health in the U.S. But very few are aware of the fact that it produced and distributed three films in 1980. While these films are nothing like the Hollywood blockbusters you queue for in movie houses, they were real pro productions. In fact, two of them had Studs Terkel, the well-known radio broadcaster and historian, as narrator.

So why were the films banned and who initiated the move? More importantly, what do the films contain? Most safety and health professionals, even those belonging to the OSHA staff, didn’t know that OSHA produced and distributed the three films during the Carter Administration. It was actually during the last days of Dr. Eula Bingham as head of OSHA.

The series of 30-minute films are mostly about the safety of workers. Their titles are “Worker to Worker,” “Can’t Take No More,” and “The Story of OSHA”.

Then the year 1981 came, along with the great ban. The order came from no other than Reagan-appointed OSHA head, Thorne Auchter. It was said that Auchter thought the films were too biased towards workers.

“Worker To Worker”

So it happened that the films were recalled and later destroyed. They became unavailable to the public and even to OSHA staff themselves. Not a single government library had records of these OSHA-produced films.


“Cant Take No More”

Fortunately for history buffs and safety and health professionals, some union officials kept copies of the films. This was remarkable considering that Auchter threatened to cut OSHA funding for their safety and health programs.


“The Story of OSHA”

Now after almost 30 years, we can finally watch these three films. This is of course through the efforts of nonprofit corporation PublicResource.Org and safety and health expert Mark Catlin.

 

 

This Safety Video Is So Popular That’ It’s Now In Karaoke Format! – “Dumb Ways to Die – Official Karaoke Edition”

Thanks everyone for watching Dumb Ways to Die! Here’s a karaoke version so you can sing along – or make up your own words if you’re feeling creative. Have fun! (And be safe around trains.)
Cheers,
Metro

The free MP3 of the karaoke version is here: http://soundcloud.com/tangerinekitty/tangerine-kitty-dumb-ways-to-2

Above is the original video that has gone viral many times over!

Full lyrics:
Set fire to your hair
Poke a stick at a grizzly bear
Eat medicine that’s out of date
Use your private parts as piranha bait

Dumb ways to die
So many dumb ways to die
Dumb ways to die-ie-ie
So many dumb ways to die

Get your toast out with a fork
Do your own electrical work
Teach yourself how to fly
Eat a two week old unrefrigerated pie

Dumb ways to die
So many dumb ways to die
Dumb ways to die-ie-ie
So many dumb ways to die

Invite a psycho-killer inside
Scratch a drug dealer‘s brand new ride
Take your helmet off in outer space
Use your clothes dryer as a hiding place

Dumb ways to die
So many dumb ways to die
Dumb ways to die-ie-ie
So many dumb ways to die

Keep a rattlesnake as a pet
Sell both your kidneys on the internet
Eat a tube of superglue
“I wonder what’s this red button do?”

Dumb ways to die
So many dumb ways to die
Dumb ways to di-ie-ie-ie
So many dumb ways to die

Dress up like a moose during hunting season
Disturb a nest of wasps for no good reason
Stand on the edge of a train station platform
Drive around the boom gates at a level crossing
Run across the tracks between the platforms
They may not rhyme but they’re quite possibly

The dumbest ways to die
The dumbest ways to die
The dumbest ways to die-ie-ie-ie
So many dumb
So many dumb ways to die

© Metro Trains

CSB Releases New Safety Video on 2011 Explosion and Fire that Killed Five Workers during a Fireworks Disposal Operation in Hawaii

Investigation Details:
Donaldson Enterprises, Inc. Fatal Fireworks Disassembly Explosion and Fire
The U.S. Chemical Safety Board today released a new safety video depicting the events leading up to an explosion and fire that killed five workers during a fireworks disposal operation in Waipahu, Hawaii. The new video, entitled “Deadly Contract” features a new HD animation depicting highly explosive firework components igniting inside a tunnel-like magazine.

The video, which details the findings and safety recommendations resulting from the Board’s final report, was approved January 17 at a public meeting in Washington, DC. The DEI investigation report concludes that the explosion and fire resulted from unsafe disposal practices, insufficient safety requirements for government contractor selection and oversight and an absence of adequate federal regulations, standards, and guidelines for safe fireworks disposal.

In the video CSB Chairperson Rafael Moure-Eraso says, “Fireworks have been around for centuries, so we were surprised to learn that there are no good-practice procedures for their disposal. And we also found that the federal government did not require fireworks disposal contractors to demonstrate that they could perform the work safely.”

The April 8, 2011, incident occurred as employees of Donaldson Enterprises, Inc. (DEI) sought shelter from rain inside a storage magazine located in Waipahu, Hawaii, near Honolulu. The storage facility contained government-confiscated, illegally labeled fireworks, which the workers had been dismantling under a subcontract to a federal prime contract. To conduct this work, DEI personnel cut into the fireworks and separated out the aerial shells and black powder – a highly explosive mixture of chemicals used to propel the fireworks into the air. The accumulation of aerial shells and black powder greatly increased the explosion hazard.

The video includes an interview with Mr. Ali Reza, an explosives expert that worked with the CSB on its investigation. In the video Mr. Rezas says, ”As you’re physically breaking up the fireworks…you’re exposing yourself to the black powder. Once you have loose black powder in contact with materials that can create friction, an ignition is extremely likely.”

CSB Investigator Amanda Johnson states, “While the exact ignition source could not be determined, strong possibilities include friction from an office chair rolling over the loose explosive powder on the magazine floor, or a metal spark from a hand truck, which was blown over 100 feet from the magazine entrance when the explosion occurred.”

The final report notes that OSHA’s Process Safety Management (PSM) standard applies to fireworks manufacturing, but not to fireworks disposal work. The investigation determined, “DEI would have greatly benefitted from Process Safety Management (PSM) principles and concepts of inherent safety,” among them, not accumulating large amounts of highly explosive black powder and aerial shells while awaiting disposal.

Investigator Amanda Johnson said, “The CSB found the root causes of the explosion went far beyond DEI’s flawed procedures. For instance, we found there are no federal, state or local codes, regulations or standards that establish safety requirements or provide guidance on proper ways to dispose of fireworks.”

As a result of the report’s findings the CSB is recommending that federal agencies develop a new government-wide safety and environmental responsibility requirement for contractors, and calls for new regulations on the safe disposal of fireworks, a growing problem across the US.

The CSB released its final report and formal safety recommendation at a public meeting in Washington, DC on January 17, 2013.

The video is available to stream or download on http://www.csb.gov and may be viewed on the CSB’s YouTube channel, USCSB (www.youtube.com/uscsb).

The CSB is an independent federal agency charged with investigating serious chemical accidents. The agency’s board members are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate. CSB investigations look into all aspects of chemical accidents, including physical causes such as equipment failure as well as inadequacies in regulations, industry standards, and safety management systems.

The Board does not issue citations or fines but does make safety recommendations to plants, industry organizations, labor groups, and regulatory agencies such as OSHA and EPA. Visit our website, http://www.csb.gov.

For more information, contact CSB Communications Manager Hillary Cohen, cell 202 446.8094, or Sandy Gilmour, cell 202.251.5496.

 

The Crazy Things People Do – Another Reason To Adopt, Promote & Nurture A Proactive Safety Culture!

 

Note: Some Adults Are Equally At fault Too! Don’t Try Any of These Stunts At Home! – Video Contains Some PG Language.

The Dangerous Behaviors Foundation asked victims’ parents to report choking game deaths and recorded 416 fatalities as of last September.

Emergency rooms are seeing more and more teens with injuries that result from emulating things they see on YouTube videos that include the choking game, and other more innocuous sounding but deadly games such as the “cinnamon challenge,” the “salt-and-ice challenge,” “chubby bunny” and even extreme fighting.

Dr. Thomas Abramo, the chief of pediatric emergency medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said he sees all of it in his ER. Although teens have acted on risky behavior fads throughout his 30-year career, he said he’s seeing trends catch on faster than ever before, and he thinks it’s because of YouTube and social media.

“If you get one kid doing it, you tend to see more kids doing it,” said Abramo, who said two of his patients have died playing the choking game. “The spread of the event is definitely faster.”

One challenge that scares Abramo involves being hit on the head with a bench or a folding chair to “see if you can take it,” he said. A lot of the time, they can’t.

“Fractures, concussions, lacerations,” Abramo said. “Just the things you would think would happen.”

“Once you see some of these videos, you go, ‘Oh my God,'” the doctor said. The “Darwin award” videos, which involve varying dangerous challenges, are the worst he’s seen. “Survival of the stupidest. I can’t believe it happens. It defies logic,” Abramo said.

YouTube’s guidelines prohibit content that encourages dangerous behavior, but 72 hours of new video are uploaded each minute, according to YouTube statistics, making it difficult to prevent dangerous content being posted.

“We count on our users to flag content they believe violates the rules,” a YouTube spokesman said. “We review flagged videos around the clock and remove all those that violate our policies.”

Try to practice Safety in all that you do and teach it to your kids too. Remember trying to set the next record or showing off, might be the one time that you get severely hurt, or worse……..

 

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