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“OSHA Quick Cards – Pocket Safety Cards For Tool Box Talks – Available In English & Spanish”

OSHA Quick Card

  • Aerial Lifts Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Avian Flu:
    General Precautions [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Poultry Workers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Healthcare Workers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Animal Handlers (Not Poultry Workers) [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Food Handlers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
    Lab Workers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
  • Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Chain Saw Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Chipper Machine Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Construction Hazards (Top Four) Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
  • Construction PPE Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Crane Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Demolition Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Electrical Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Fall Protection Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Fireworks Safety Pocket Card (Retail Fireworks Sales) [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Fireworks Safety Pocket Card (Display Operators) [English: PDF | HTML]
  • General Decontamination Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Hand Hygiene Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Heat Stress Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Hydrogen Sulfide Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Lead in Construction Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Mold Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML | Vietnamese: PDF]
  • Motor Vehicles Safe Driving Practices for Employees [English: PDF | HTML Spanish: HTML]
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Pest Control Pyrotechnics Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Portable Generator Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Portable Ladder Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Rescuers of Animals [English & Spanish PDF]
  • Respirators Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Rodents, Snakes & Insects Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML | Vietnamese: PDF]
  • Tree Trimming & Removal Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML | Vietnamese: PDF]
  • West Nile Virus Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Working Safely in Trenches Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Work Zone Traffic Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
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Forklift Safety – “Are Your Employees Trained Properly?”

Note: This video may sound and seem funny, but it’s not, these are dangerous acts and accidents!

Frequently Asked Questions about Powered Industrial Truck Operator Training


The powered industrial truck operator training requirements apply to all industries where trucks are being used, except agricultural operations.

1. What is the definition of a powered industrial truck?

Any mobile power-propelled truck used to carry, push, pull, lift, stack or tier materials. Powered industrial trucks can be ridden or controlled by a walking operator. Earth moving and over the road haulage trucks are not included in the definition. Equipment that was designed to move earth but has been modified to accept forks are also not included.

2. What does the standard require?

The standard requires employers to develop and implement a training program based on the general principles of safe truck operation, the types of vehicle(s) being used in the workplace, the hazards of the workplace created by the use of the vehicle(s), and the general safety requirements of the OSHA standard. Trained operators must know how to do the job properly and do it safely as demonstrated by workplace evaluation. Formal (lecture, video, etc.) and practical (demonstration and practical exercises) training must be provided. Employers must also certify that each operator has received the training and evaluate each operator at least once every three years. Prior to operating the truck in the workplace, the employer must evaluate the operator’s performance and determine the operator to be competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely. Refresher training is needed whenever an operator demonstrates a deficiency in the safe operation of the truck.

3. Does OSHA provide a list of topics to include in my training program?

Yes. The standard provides a list of training topics; however, the employer may exclude those topics which are not relevant to safe operation at the employee’s work location.

4. Who should conduct the training?

All training and evaluation must be conducted by persons with the necessary knowledge, training, and experience to train powered industrial truck operators and evaluate their competence. An example of a qualified trainer would be a person who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience has demonstrated the ability to train and evaluate powered industrial truck operators.

There are many resources available to the employer if he/she chooses not to perform the training himself. Truck manufacturers, local safety and health safety organizations, such as the National Safety Council local chapters, private consultants with expertise in powered industrial trucks, local trade and vocational schools are some available resources.

Various Internet sites are devoted to forklift safety. Private companies who provide forklift safety training services, including videos and written programs, can be located on various Internet websites. Most videos can be either leased or purchased. One important thing to remember is that simply by showing employees a video or videos on some aspect of forklift safety does not meet the full requirements of the OSHA standard. Site specific information must be conveyed as well as a method to evaluate the employee’s acquired knowledge subsequent to the training.

5. If my employees receive training from an outside consultant, how will I know that these employees have been adequately trained?

Outside qualified training organizations can provide evidence that the employee has successfully completed the relevant classroom and practical training. However, each employer must ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation.

6. My employees receive training from the union on the use of powered industrial trucks. Will I have to provide any additional training?

When a worker reports to work, the employer must evaluate the employee to ensure that he/she is knowledgeable about the operation of the powered industrial trucks he/she will be assigned to operate. This evaluation could be as simple as having a person with the requisite skills, knowledge and experience observe the operator performing several typical operations to ensure that the truck is being operated safely and asking the operator a few questions related to the safe operation of the vehicle. If the operator has operated the same type of equipment before in the same type of environment that he/she will be expected to be working, then duplicative or additional training is not required.

7. Is testing required?

No. The standard does not specifically require testing; however, some method of evaluation is necessary.

8. Does OSHA require the employer to issue licenses to employees who have received training?

No. The OSHA standard does not require employees to be licensed. An employer may choose to issue licenses to trained operators.

9. What type of records or documentation must I keep?

The OSHA standard requires that the employer certify that each operator has received the training and has been evaluated. The written certification record must include the name of the operator, the date of the training, the date of the evaluation, and the identify of the person(s) performing the training or evaluation.

10. How long must I keep the certification records?

Employers who evaluate the operator’s performance more frequently than every three years may retain the most recent certification record; otherwise, certification records must be maintained for three years.

11. If my employees receive training, but accidents still continue to occur, what should I do?

Refresher training in relevant topics is necessary when the operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident.

12. Is annual training required?

No. An evaluation of each powered industrial truck operator’s performance is required to be conducted after initial training, after refresher training, and at least once every three years.

13. How often must refresher training be given?

The standard does not require any specific frequency of refresher training. Refresher training must be provided when:

  1. The operator has been observed to operate the vehicle in an unsafe manner.
  2. The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident.
  3. The operator has received an evaluation that reveals that the operator is not operating the truck safely.
  4. The operator is assigned to drive a different type of truck.
  5. A condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect safety operation of the truck.

14. If my employees have already received training, or have been operating trucks for many years, must I retrain them?

No. An employer does not need to retrain an employee in the operation of a powered industrial truck if the employer certifies that the operator has been evaluated and has proven to be competent to operate the truck safely. The operator would need additional training in those elements where his or her performance indicates the need for further training and for new types of equipment and areas of operation.

15. How do I evaluate my employee’s competency to operate a truck safely?

Evaluation of an operator’s performance can be determined by a number of ways, such as:

  • a discussion with the employee
  • an observation of the employee operating the powered industrial truck
  • written documentation of previous training
  • a performance test

16. Does OSHA provide training to my truck operators?

No. It is the employer’s responsibility to train the employees.

17. Do I have to train all employees in my workplace?

Any employee that operates a powered industrial truck must be trained.

18. Do I have to ensure that my operator’s are physically capable of driving a powered industry truck?

The new standard does not contain provisions for checking vision, hearing or general medical status of employees operating powered industrial trucks. The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) addresses the issue of whether employers may impose physical qualifications upon employees or applicants for employment. The ADA permits employers to adopt medical qualification requirements which are necessary to assure that an individual does not pose a “direct threat to the health or safety of other individuals in the workplace” provided all reasonable efforts are made to accommodate otherwise qualified individuals.

19. I have three different types of trucks in my workplace. Can I provide training on just one type of truck?

If an operator will be expected to operate all three types of vehicles, then training must address the unique characteristics of each type of vehicle the employee is expected to operate. When an attachment is used on the truck to move odd-shaped materials, then the operator training must include instruction on the safe conduct of those operations so that the operator knows and understands the restrictions or limitations created by each vehicle’s use.

20. I only have powered hand trucks in my workplace. Do the training requirements cover the operators of this type of vehicle? The operator walks alongside the unit while holding onto the handle to guide it.

Yes. The use of powered hand trucks present numerous hazards to employees who operate them and those working in the area where they are used.

21. I employ drivers from a temporary agency. Who provides them training – the temporary service or me?

OSHA has issued several letters of interpretations on the subject of training of temporary employees. Basically, there is a shared responsibility for assuring employees are adequately trained. The responsibility for providing training should be spelled out in the contractual agreement between the two parties. The temporary agency or the contracting employer may conduct the training and evaluation of operators from a temporary agency as required by the standard; however, the host employer (or other employer who enters into a contract with the temporary agency) must provide site-specific information and training on the use of the particular types of trucks and workplace-related topics that are present in the workplace.

22. Should my training include the use of operator restraint devices (e.g. seat belts)?

Employers are required to train employees in all operating instructions, warnings, and precautions listed in the operator’s manual for the type of vehicle which the employee is being trained to operate. Therefore, operators must be trained in the use of operator restraint systems when it is addressed in the operating instructions.

23. What does OSHA expect to achieve as a result of improved operator’s training?

OSHA’s goal is to reduce the number of injuries and illnesses that occur to workers in the workplace from unsafe powered industrial truck usage. By providing an effective training program many other benefits will result. Among these are the lower cost of compensation insurance, less property damage, and less product damage.

24. Where can I get additional information about OSHA standards?

For more information, contact your local or Regional OSHA office (listed in the telephone directory under United States Government – Department of Labor – Occupational Safety and Health Administration). OSHA also has a Home Page on the Internet.

 

“OSHA Quick Cards – Pocket Safety Cards For Tool Box Talks & More! – Available In English / Spanish”

OSHA Quick Card

  • Aerial Lifts Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Avian Flu:
    General Precautions [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Poultry Workers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Healthcare Workers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Animal Handlers (Not Poultry Workers) [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Food Handlers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
    Lab Workers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
  • Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Chain Saw Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Chipper Machine Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Construction Hazards (Top Four) Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
  • Construction PPE Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Crane Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Demolition Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Electrical Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Fall Protection Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Fireworks Safety Pocket Card (Retail Fireworks Sales) [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Fireworks Safety Pocket Card (Display Operators) [English: PDF | HTML]
  • General Decontamination Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Hand Hygiene Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Heat Stress Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Hydrogen Sulfide Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Lead in Construction Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Mold Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML | Vietnamese: PDF]
  • Motor Vehicles Safe Driving Practices for Employees [English: PDF | HTML Spanish: HTML]
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Pest Control Pyrotechnics Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Portable Generator Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Portable Ladder Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Rescuers of Animals [English & Spanish PDF]
  • Respirators Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Rodents, Snakes & Insects Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML | Vietnamese: PDF]
  • Tree Trimming & Removal Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML | Vietnamese: PDF]
  • West Nile Virus Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Working Safely in Trenches Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Work Zone Traffic Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]

Safety Photo of the Year: “Why Lock-Out, Tag-Out IS Vitally Important”

Caution: Somewhat Graphic Photo – Note: This Photo is the property of Jack Benton, and may not be used without written consent. Note: I dont know all of the details of this incident and only know that this accident was caused by failure to follow LOTO procedures.

Why LOTO is Vitally Important 3

Why LOTO is Vitally Important 2

Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)


Introduction

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities.

Approximately 3 million workers service equipment and face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented. Compliance with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation. In a study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities (83 of 414) that occurred among their members between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically, lockout/tagout procedures.

LOTO is addressed in specific standards for the general industry, marine terminals, longshoring, and the construction industry.

Standards

This section highlights OSHA standards, preambles to final rules (background to final rules), directives (instructions for compliance officers), standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to LOTO.

Note: Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

OSHA

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)

Marine Terminals (29 CFR 1917)

Longshoring (29 CFR 1918)

Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)

Preambles to Final Rules

Directives

Standard Interpretations

National Consensus

Note: These are NOT OSHA regulations. However, they do provide guidance from their originating organizations related to worker protection.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

Lockout/Tagout Concepts

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities. This requires that a designated individual turns off and disconnects the machinery or equipment from its energy source(s) before performing service or maintenance and that the authorized employee(s) either lock or tag the energy-isolating device(s) to prevent the release of hazardous energy and take steps to verify that the energy has been isolated effectively. The following references provide information about the LOTO process.

  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD) Research Publications-11. Also available as a 49 KB PDF, 2 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout [212 KB PDF*, 2 pages]. OSHA Fact Sheet, (2002). A Spanish version [49 KB PDF*, 1 page] is also available.
  • Preventing Worker Deaths from Uncontrolled Release of Electrical, Mechanical, and Other Types of Hazardous Energy. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-110, (1999, August).
  • Guidelines for Controlling Hazardous Energy During Maintenance and Servicing [Lockout/Tagout]. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 83-125, (1983, September).

Lockout/Tagout Program

Example elements of a lockout/tagout (LOTO) program are described in the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.147, along with these additional references.

Additional Information

Related Safety and Health Topics Pages

Training

  • Small Business Handbook. OSHA Publication 2209-02R, (2005). Also available as a 260 KB PDF, 56 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD). Provides an index to several training videos available through NASD.
  • Rollstock and Sheet Extrusion Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an extrusion molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Injection Molding Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an injection molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Roll-fed and Inline Thermoforming Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating roll-fed and inline thermoforming machines.

“Infographic: OSHA’s Recordkeeping Rule Updates: What Employers Need to Know.”

On September 11, 2014, OSHA announced a final rule that alters requirements for reporting work-related fatalities and severe injuries and updates the list of injuries that are partially exempt from the injury and illness recordkeeping requirement. This BLR infographic provides an overview of the changes, which take effect on January 1, 2015.

OSHA's Recordkeeping Rule Updates: What Employers Need to Know

OSHA’s Recordkeeping Rule Updates: What Employers Need to Know by Safety.BLR.com

“The OSHA SDS/GHS Hazcom Compliance Myth”

GHS SheetAfter the passage of the revised Hazcom standard in 2012, there was a great deal of confusion and misinformation generated regarding the revision from the old standard and format to the new one. This was and still is especially true for employers attempting to comply with “Employee Right to Know (Understand)” rules. By now, everybody knows about the new standardized 16 section format, the new pictograms and hazard phrases, etc. It is also commonly known that the deadline for training employees on how to read and interpret the difference between the old and new format was December 1, 2013. But what about all of the existing (m)SDS’s you have already? What do you need to do to comply with the new Hazcom rule regarding updating your collection of (m)SDS’s?

As someone who works for a company that offers (m)SDS management software, I hear over and over from our clients about the urgent need for them to update their (m)SDS binders so that they would be using the most recent “GHS compliant” version. When I asked them why they wanted to do this, every one of them said it was because they wanted to be compliant with the new GHS rule. When I asked them where they found out about the need to update their library, again almost every reply was unanimous……from a salesperson at a company who offers (m)SDS management software. OSHA compliance is serious business, but that means that there is also serious money to be made to help you maintain compliance. But how much of this is hype and what is really required?

The fact is that you must retain the newest versions of the (m)SDS as you receive them from your suppliers. Beyond that, OSHA does not require you to proactively update your existing collection, as long as your employees know and understand the difference between the new and old format. If one of your suppliers re-authors their (m)SDS into the new format, they are required by law to send you the new revision and you are required to replace the old one you already have with the new one that you received. You are not required to search for updates proactivly.

Keeping in mind that I work for a company that offers (m)SDS management software, I realize that any opinion I espouse should be met with appropriate skepticism. Therefore, please refer directly to what OSHA has said. A letter of clarification was issued on June 13, 2014 to address this issue. Here is the relevent text:

“…OSHA would not issue citations for maintenance of MSDSs when SDSs have not been received….employers may, but are not required to, contact manufacturers or distributers of products they have previously ordered to request new SDSs”.

Here is a link to the full text: OSHA letter of clarification:  http://www.m3vsoftware.com/downloads/OSHA-Letter-of-Clarification.pdf

M3V has been providing web based (m)SDS management tools since 2002. For more information about our products and services, please click:
SDS Explorer
Chemical Management Navigator
EH&S Task Manager
Ross Olsby
M3V Data Management
11925 East 65th Street
Indianapolis, IN 46236
317-823-2459
ross@m3vsoftware.com

Source: M3V Data Management:  http://www.m3vsoftware.com/News.asp

Take This 5 Question Survey – “How Safe Is Your Company?”

How Safe is Your Company- - Safety Quiz 2014-06-10 14-12-03Click Link Here To Take The Test: http://www.staples.com/sbd/cre/marketing/safety-quiz/

Only half of employees believe their workplaces are prepared for a severe emergency, according to the third annual workplace safety survey by Staples Inc. And nearly two-thirds of those polled said recent natural disasters have not led to their employers reassessing company safety plans.

The survey, in honor of National Safety Month, also reveals that in the past six months, nearly half of businesses have closed due to severe weather, costing the economy nearly $50 billion in lost productivity.

“Safety is a top priority for employers, but there is still more planning and training that can be done to improve safety in the workplace,” said Bob Risk, national safety, health and wellness manager for Staples.

According to the survey, the top three safety concerns for employees are:

Slips, trips and falls: One in five report slipping, tripping or falling at work as their biggest concern. Accidents involving slips, trips and falls send 9 million people to the hospital each year and are a leading cause of workers’ compensation claims, costing an average of approximately $20,000 per injury.

Natural disasters and storms: Less than half of employees say their employers have the plans or equipment in place for snow and ice storms, or catastrophic events such as tornadoes, hurricanes or earthquakes. According to the Institute for Business and Home Safety, an estimated 25 percent of businesses do not reopen after a natural disaster.

Fire: Fire is one of the most common safety incidents, but most employees feel their companies are well prepared. Three-fourths say their employers have a plan and equipment in place for a fire emergency.

Small Business Employees Feel More At Risk

The survey finds workers at businesses with fewer than 50 people are less aware or less sure who is in charge of emergency planning than employees at larger companies. Employees from smaller companies report having less emergency equipment or plans in place, are less likely to do safety reviews or drills, and are less prepared for severe emergencies than their counterparts at bigger organizations.

Staples offers these tips for a safer working environment:

  • Businesses should assess and make sure they comply OSHA regulations. While exact safety products may differ between businesses, a good starting point of must-have safety products includes first-aid kits, fire extinguishers, crank-powered cell phone chargers and flashlights, personal protective equipment (such as protective clothing and respiratory protection), and the following emergency items: water/food, blankets, and exit signs.
  • A good safety plan includes procedures to respond to various emergency situations, methods to recover and maintain business continuity, securing adequate resources and supplies for crisis events and employee training.
  • To help limit slips, trips and falls in the workplaces, businesses should be vigilant about cleaning up spills immediately and posting signs identifying hazards, such as wet surfaces or areas that are being cleaned. Electrical cords often are an overlooked hazard – make sure these are not laid out in heavily foot traffic areas.

Find out how your company compares by taking answering five questions in the interactive infographic, How Safe Is Your Company?

Source: Staples®

 

OSHA Quick Cards – Pocket Safety Cards For Use In Tool Box Talks & More!

OSHA Quick Card

  • Aerial Lifts Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Avian Flu:
    General Precautions [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Poultry Workers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Healthcare Workers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Animal Handlers (Not Poultry Workers) [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
    Food Handlers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
    Lab Workers [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
  • Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Chain Saw Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Chipper Machine Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Construction Hazards (Top Four) Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: HTML]
  • Construction PPE Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Crane Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Demolition Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Electrical Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Fall Protection Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Fireworks Safety Pocket Card (Retail Fireworks Sales) [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Fireworks Safety Pocket Card (Display Operators) [English: PDF | HTML]
  • General Decontamination Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Hand Hygiene Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Heat Stress Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Hydrogen Sulfide Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Lead in Construction Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Mold Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML | Vietnamese: PDF]
  • Motor Vehicles Safe Driving Practices for Employees [English: PDF | HTML Spanish: HTML]
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Pest Control Pyrotechnics Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Portable Generator Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Portable Ladder Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML]
  • Rescuers of Animals [English & Spanish PDF]
  • Respirators Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Rodents, Snakes & Insects Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML | Vietnamese: PDF]
  • Tree Trimming & Removal Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML | Vietnamese: PDF]
  • West Nile Virus Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Working Safely in Trenches Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]
  • Work Zone Traffic Safety Quick Card [English: PDF | HTML | Spanish: PDF | HTML]

“4-Step Forklift Preoperation Walkaround Inspection”

Forklift-Inspection-Notice-Sign-S-1958

Do your employees know how to conduct a walkaround as part of a preoperational forklift inspection?

The first step toward safe forklift operation is conducting the preoperational inspection. Forklift operators should conduct the inspection at the start of each work shift to ensure that the forklift will work properly.

According to OSHA, 1 in 15 forklift-related accidents are caused by improper maintenance. A thorough preoperational inspection will identify maintenance problems before they cause an accident.

Operators should follow your preoperational inspection checklist—not skipping any items—and then complete and sign the checklist.

The preoperational inspection begins with a four-step walkaround:

  • First, the operator makes sure the forklift is properly disengaged with the forks down, the key turned off, and the forklift set in neutral with the parking brake on.
  • Second, the operator walks to either side of the forklift—checks the tires, making sure there are no gouges, tears, or imbedded metal, and that there is proper inflation; checks lug nuts; makes sure the axle is greased; checks the overhead guard, and sees that there is no debris lodged behind the mast.
  • Third, the operator checks the front of the forklift—the forks and hoses should be in good condition; fork pins should be in place; the backrest should be solid; and the mast and chains should be greased.
  • Fourth, the operator walks to the rear of the forklift—checks that the counterbalance bolt is tight, and the radiator is clear of debris and is not leaking.
Ensure Safe Forklift Operations

Forklifts possess unique capabilities that when matched to a given job can accomplish tasks efficiently and effectively. But if this equipment is used in an unsafe manner, the hazards far outweigh those benefits.

Ensuring safe forklift operation is increasingly difficult what with the advent of myriad distractions for drivers, including cell phones, ipods, and other electronic devices. Also, pedestrians are becoming increasingly distracted by such devices, too.

It’s imperative to ensure that your forklift safety program addresses emerging distractions like these, as well as traditional forklift safety issues. Plus, organizations should weigh whether it makes sense to invest in GPS tracking and telemetry to improve overall safety and incident reduction for their forklift fleet.

Source: BLR®

Forklift Safety – “Are Your Employees Trained Properly?”

Note: This video may sound and seem funny, but it’s not, these are dangerous acts and accidents!

Frequently Asked Questions about Powered Industrial Truck Operator Training


The powered industrial truck operator training requirements apply to all industries where trucks are being used, except agricultural operations.

1. What is the definition of a powered industrial truck?

Any mobile power-propelled truck used to carry, push, pull, lift, stack or tier materials. Powered industrial trucks can be ridden or controlled by a walking operator. Earth moving and over the road haulage trucks are not included in the definition. Equipment that was designed to move earth but has been modified to accept forks are also not included.

2. What does the standard require?

The standard requires employers to develop and implement a training program based on the general principles of safe truck operation, the types of vehicle(s) being used in the workplace, the hazards of the workplace created by the use of the vehicle(s), and the general safety requirements of the OSHA standard. Trained operators must know how to do the job properly and do it safely as demonstrated by workplace evaluation. Formal (lecture, video, etc.) and practical (demonstration and practical exercises) training must be provided. Employers must also certify that each operator has received the training and evaluate each operator at least once every three years. Prior to operating the truck in the workplace, the employer must evaluate the operator’s performance and determine the operator to be competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely. Refresher training is needed whenever an operator demonstrates a deficiency in the safe operation of the truck.

3. Does OSHA provide a list of topics to include in my training program?

Yes. The standard provides a list of training topics; however, the employer may exclude those topics which are not relevant to safe operation at the employee’s work location.

4. Who should conduct the training?

All training and evaluation must be conducted by persons with the necessary knowledge, training, and experience to train powered industrial truck operators and evaluate their competence. An example of a qualified trainer would be a person who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience has demonstrated the ability to train and evaluate powered industrial truck operators.

There are many resources available to the employer if he/she chooses not to perform the training himself. Truck manufacturers, local safety and health safety organizations, such as the National Safety Council local chapters, private consultants with expertise in powered industrial trucks, local trade and vocational schools are some available resources.

Various Internet sites are devoted to forklift safety. Private companies who provide forklift safety training services, including videos and written programs, can be located on various Internet websites. Most videos can be either leased or purchased. One important thing to remember is that simply by showing employees a video or videos on some aspect of forklift safety does not meet the full requirements of the OSHA standard. Site specific information must be conveyed as well as a method to evaluate the employee’s acquired knowledge subsequent to the training.

5. If my employees receive training from an outside consultant, how will I know that these employees have been adequately trained?

Outside qualified training organizations can provide evidence that the employee has successfully completed the relevant classroom and practical training. However, each employer must ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation.

6. My employees receive training from the union on the use of powered industrial trucks. Will I have to provide any additional training?

When a worker reports to work, the employer must evaluate the employee to ensure that he/she is knowledgeable about the operation of the powered industrial trucks he/she will be assigned to operate. This evaluation could be as simple as having a person with the requisite skills, knowledge and experience observe the operator performing several typical operations to ensure that the truck is being operated safely and asking the operator a few questions related to the safe operation of the vehicle. If the operator has operated the same type of equipment before in the same type of environment that he/she will be expected to be working, then duplicative or additional training is not required.

7. Is testing required?

No. The standard does not specifically require testing; however, some method of evaluation is necessary.

8. Does OSHA require the employer to issue licenses to employees who have received training?

No. The OSHA standard does not require employees to be licensed. An employer may choose to issue licenses to trained operators.

9. What type of records or documentation must I keep?

The OSHA standard requires that the employer certify that each operator has received the training and has been evaluated. The written certification record must include the name of the operator, the date of the training, the date of the evaluation, and the identify of the person(s) performing the training or evaluation.

10. How long must I keep the certification records?

Employers who evaluate the operator’s performance more frequently than every three years may retain the most recent certification record; otherwise, certification records must be maintained for three years.

11. If my employees receive training, but accidents still continue to occur, what should I do?

Refresher training in relevant topics is necessary when the operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident.

12. Is annual training required?

No. An evaluation of each powered industrial truck operator’s performance is required to be conducted after initial training, after refresher training, and at least once every three years.

13. How often must refresher training be given?

The standard does not require any specific frequency of refresher training. Refresher training must be provided when:

  1. The operator has been observed to operate the vehicle in an unsafe manner.
  2. The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident.
  3. The operator has received an evaluation that reveals that the operator is not operating the truck safely.
  4. The operator is assigned to drive a different type of truck.
  5. A condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect safety operation of the truck.

14. If my employees have already received training, or have been operating trucks for many years, must I retrain them?

No. An employer does not need to retrain an employee in the operation of a powered industrial truck if the employer certifies that the operator has been evaluated and has proven to be competent to operate the truck safely. The operator would need additional training in those elements where his or her performance indicates the need for further training and for new types of equipment and areas of operation.

15. How do I evaluate my employee’s competency to operate a truck safely?

Evaluation of an operator’s performance can be determined by a number of ways, such as:

  • a discussion with the employee
  • an observation of the employee operating the powered industrial truck
  • written documentation of previous training
  • a performance test

16. Does OSHA provide training to my truck operators?

No. It is the employer’s responsibility to train the employees.

17. Do I have to train all employees in my workplace?

Any employee that operates a powered industrial truck must be trained.

18. Do I have to ensure that my operator’s are physically capable of driving a powered industry truck?

The new standard does not contain provisions for checking vision, hearing or general medical status of employees operating powered industrial trucks. The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) addresses the issue of whether employers may impose physical qualifications upon employees or applicants for employment. The ADA permits employers to adopt medical qualification requirements which are necessary to assure that an individual does not pose a “direct threat to the health or safety of other individuals in the workplace” provided all reasonable efforts are made to accommodate otherwise qualified individuals.

19. I have three different types of trucks in my workplace. Can I provide training on just one type of truck?

If an operator will be expected to operate all three types of vehicles, then training must address the unique characteristics of each type of vehicle the employee is expected to operate. When an attachment is used on the truck to move odd-shaped materials, then the operator training must include instruction on the safe conduct of those operations so that the operator knows and understands the restrictions or limitations created by each vehicle’s use.

20. I only have powered hand trucks in my workplace. Do the training requirements cover the operators of this type of vehicle? The operator walks alongside the unit while holding onto the handle to guide it.

Yes. The use of powered hand trucks present numerous hazards to employees who operate them and those working in the area where they are used.

21. I employ drivers from a temporary agency. Who provides them training – the temporary service or me?

OSHA has issued several letters of interpretations on the subject of training of temporary employees. Basically, there is a shared responsibility for assuring employees are adequately trained. The responsibility for providing training should be spelled out in the contractual agreement between the two parties. The temporary agency or the contracting employer may conduct the training and evaluation of operators from a temporary agency as required by the standard; however, the host employer (or other employer who enters into a contract with the temporary agency) must provide site-specific information and training on the use of the particular types of trucks and workplace-related topics that are present in the workplace.

22. Should my training include the use of operator restraint devices (e.g. seat belts)?

Employers are required to train employees in all operating instructions, warnings, and precautions listed in the operator’s manual for the type of vehicle which the employee is being trained to operate. Therefore, operators must be trained in the use of operator restraint systems when it is addressed in the operating instructions.

23. What does OSHA expect to achieve as a result of improved operator’s training?

OSHA’s goal is to reduce the number of injuries and illnesses that occur to workers in the workplace from unsafe powered industrial truck usage. By providing an effective training program many other benefits will result. Among these are the lower cost of compensation insurance, less property damage, and less product damage.

24. Where can I get additional information about OSHA standards?

For more information, contact your local or Regional OSHA office (listed in the telephone directory under United States Government – Department of Labor – Occupational Safety and Health Administration). OSHA also has a Home Page on the Internet.

 

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