Changing The Safety Culture: You Got To Want It

Jack Benton:

Another great article and read by my good friend Phil La Duke!

Originally posted on Phil La Duke's Blog:

By Phil LaDuke

 

To some extent the world is driven by desire, and I have said (quoting a long-time friend) that you always have the time and money for what is truly important to you.  As I continue battling to sell safety systems to companies who truly do need to change their cultures I am continually beset by companies who are quick to say all the right things but when it comes to making a commitment they just plain lack the political will to get things done.

Of course no one will ever admit that they don’t want a safe workplace; to do so would brand them a villain worse than any war criminal.  So why is it so difficult to sell companies who employ large staffs dedicated to making the workplace safer? And why is it harder still to maintain the momentum it takes to drive lasting and…

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“Confined Spaces in Construction” – “What Employers Need To Know”

OSHA recently issued a final rule requiring construction employers to take steps to protect workers from confined space hazards. (Previously, confined space rules only applied to general industry.) Check out the infographic to learn the essentials of the new rule and what you need to do to comply.

Confined Spaces in Construction

Confined Spaces in Construction: What Employers Need to Know by Safety.BLR.com

Safety Photo of the Year: “Why Lock-Out, Tag-Out IS Vitally Important”

Caution: Somewhat Graphic Photo – Note: This Photo is the property of Jack Benton, and may not be used without written consent. Note: I dont know all of the details of this incident and only know that this accident was caused by failure to follow LOTO procedures.

Why LOTO is Vitally Important 3

Why LOTO is Vitally Important 2

Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)


Introduction

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities.

Approximately 3 million workers service equipment and face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented. Compliance with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation. In a study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities (83 of 414) that occurred among their members between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically, lockout/tagout procedures.

LOTO is addressed in specific standards for the general industry, marine terminals, longshoring, and the construction industry.

Standards

This section highlights OSHA standards, preambles to final rules (background to final rules), directives (instructions for compliance officers), standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to LOTO.

Note: Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

OSHA

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)

Marine Terminals (29 CFR 1917)

Longshoring (29 CFR 1918)

Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)

Preambles to Final Rules

Directives

Standard Interpretations

National Consensus

Note: These are NOT OSHA regulations. However, they do provide guidance from their originating organizations related to worker protection.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

Lockout/Tagout Concepts

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures to safeguard employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machinery and equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities. This requires that a designated individual turns off and disconnects the machinery or equipment from its energy source(s) before performing service or maintenance and that the authorized employee(s) either lock or tag the energy-isolating device(s) to prevent the release of hazardous energy and take steps to verify that the energy has been isolated effectively. The following references provide information about the LOTO process.

  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD) Research Publications-11. Also available as a 49 KB PDF, 2 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout [212 KB PDF*, 2 pages]. OSHA Fact Sheet, (2002). A Spanish version [49 KB PDF*, 1 page] is also available.
  • Preventing Worker Deaths from Uncontrolled Release of Electrical, Mechanical, and Other Types of Hazardous Energy. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-110, (1999, August).
  • Guidelines for Controlling Hazardous Energy During Maintenance and Servicing [Lockout/Tagout]. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 83-125, (1983, September).

Lockout/Tagout Program

Example elements of a lockout/tagout (LOTO) program are described in the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.147, along with these additional references.

Additional Information

Related Safety and Health Topics Pages

Training

  • Small Business Handbook. OSHA Publication 2209-02R, (2005). Also available as a 260 KB PDF, 56 pages.
  • Lockout/Tagout. National Ag Safety Database (NASD). Provides an index to several training videos available through NASD.
  • Rollstock and Sheet Extrusion Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an extrusion molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Injection Molding Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating an injection molding machine and ways to avoid those injuries.
  • Roll-fed and Inline Thermoforming Machine Safety Training Course. OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. (SPI) Alliance. Contains machine-specific modules on machine guarding and lockout/tagout and helps to identify the types of injuries that can occur while operating roll-fed and inline thermoforming machines.

“New NIOSH Smart Phone App Addresses Ladder Safety”

Contact: Christina Spring (202) 245-0633

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) announces the availability of a new Ladder Safety smart phone application (app). This new app uses visual and audio signals to make it easier for workers using extension ladders to check the angle the ladder is positioned at, as well as access useful tips for using extension ladders safely. The app is available for free download for both iPhone and Android devices.

Falls from ladders are a common source of preventable construction injuries. Misjudging the ladder angle is a significant risk factor for a fall. If the ladder is set too steep it is more likely to fall back or away during use, and if it is set too shallow then the bottom can slide out.

“The ladder safety app is an innovative way to help keep workers safe and a tool to reduce these preventable injuries,” said NIOSH Director John Howard, M.D. “The development of this smart phone app also demonstrates how we are constantly working to make science-based practical information accessible to workers and employers in a way they need and can easily use.”

The app provides feedback to the user on positioning the extension ladder at the optimal angle. It also provides references and a safety guide for extension ladder selection, inspection, accessorizing, and use. It was developed with input from the ANSI A14 committee on Ladder Safety, the American Ladder Institute, and other stakeholders.

NIOSH collaborated with DSFederal on the final development and testing of the app before release. The app is based on a multimodal inclination indicator for ladder positioning that has been recently awarded a US patent. To learn more and download the Ladder Safety app visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/falls/ and to learn about the campaign to prevent falls in construction go to http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/construction/stopfalls.html.

NIOSH is the federal agency that conducts research and makes recommendations for preventing work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths. For more information about our work visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/.

  

“Safety Comic of the Day” – July 11, 2015

  

“New USDA ‘FoodKeeper’ App: Your Tool for Smart Food Storage”

Jack Benton:

Pretty neat new app from the USDA.

Originally posted on Nationalsafety's Weblog:

My wife and I just got through watching a documentary entitled “Just Eat it“. It talks about the amount of food that is wasted in the US (almost 40%) and the world (almost 30%). That means that of the food that is grown, raised, prepared, packaged, etc… 40% of it ends up being discarded.

By far the worst culprit is the individual household. We over-purchase (Thanks Costco) and end up throwing a lot of the food away, thinking it is no longer good to eat. Part of it is the confusion has to do with consumers not understanding the dates on the products that they purchase. There is, of course, the “sell by” date which only means that the store should try to sell it by this date to ensure that the consumer has a reasonable shelf life let on the item after he or she gets it…

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