“AA Batteries Cause House Fire In Hastings, Nebraska” & How To Store Batteries Safely In The Home” #FireSafety

AA Batteries Rolling Around In Camera Case Cause House Fire In Hastings, Nebraska

“How To Store Batteries Safely In The Home”

HASTINGS, Neb. (KSNB) — Some of us may have that kitchen junk drawer that has loose batteries, tools, and other items in it, but these drawers might be a fire waiting to happen. If batteries touch in the wrong way, they might catch fire and cause a lot of damage.

“Don’t let them just roll in there,” Big G Ace Hardware Store Manager Linda Dill said. “Don’t let them roll against the screwdriver, because it can just transfer onto another battery or something down the line. The best thing to do is to store them upright and somehow covered.”

Fire officials said not only 9-volt batteries but other typs as well, contribute to rising cause of home fires in the last 4-5 years due to inappropriate storage of all household batteries in the home.

“You’d see them in many homes, but the positive and negative end of that battery are both very close,” Chief Kent Gilbert with the Hastings Fire Department said. “It’s easy for those to be shorted accidentally. It’s important to remember that it will create enough heat to cause a fire.”

Putting masking tape on batteries is one way to prevent them from touching. Plastic bags are another way.

“Putting them in plastic bags with all the negatives up, all the positives up, or however you want to do that,” Dill said. “Make sure they’re tight, so they don’t roll around in that.”

Officials said when people are done using the batteries they should get rid of them immediately to help ensure safety.

It’s recommended that people keep the original packing of the batteries and leave them in there until they are ready to use them.

screenshot-www-graphiq-com-2016-12-28-17-56-24

See exact data here on fire loss in deaths, dollar loss, and injuries: http://bit.ly/2hunDks

“Have Yourself a Safe, Undistracted, and Accident Free Holiday” #Safety #HolidaySafety #WorkplaceSafety

holiday-safety

Keep your holidays happy and safe. At this time of year, with all of the joy, parties, and excitement the season brings, employers need to be especially vigilant to keep and maintain a safe workplace environment for employees and customers and other third parties. A distracted or inebriated employee may be an employee at risk, which may in-turn bring liability onto the employer.

The holidays are a time to redouble your focus on workplace safety. At this time of year, people can be distracted or tired and may be teaming with people they do not ordinarily work with due to others taking time off. Working with someone new, especially at high-risk jobs, may be a recipe for disaster. It is important to ensure all employees are properly trained and qualified for the tasks they are being asked to perform, especially if a task is not within their normal job activities.

In addition, with all of the joy, parties, and excitement the season brings, employers need to be especially vigilant to keep and maintain a safe workplace for employees, customers, and other third parties. A distracted or inebriated employee may be an employee at risk, which may in-turn, bring liability onto the employer. The holidays are a good time to remind employees of drug and alcohol policies and to be on the lookout for violations of those policies. See Eleventh Circuit Says “NO” to Drunk Driving, and President Declares “National Impaired Driving Prevention Month”.

The holidays are also a time when your employees may be at risk for workplace violence, both from within the company and from third parties. Many employees will be excited about the time spent with friends and family, but many others may not have those opportunities. Be aware of the signs of a distressed and potentially violent employee. See for instance, Wave of Shootings Puts Workplace Violence Back in the Spotlight, and NIOSH Offers Free Training Program to Help Employers Address Safety Risks Faced by Home Healthcare Workers. We have also blogged about workplace safety risks from shoppers and third-parties. See Holiday Shopping and Crowd Management Safety Guidelines for Retailers,

In addition be on the lookout for other holiday workplace liability issues, especially at company holiday parties. For instance, in Don’t Let Too Much Eggnog Ruin Your Office Holiday Party: Tips to Limit Employer Liability at Company Parties, we suggested that employers consider these tips to minimize your organization’s exposure to legal liability and, more importantly, prevent an undesirable incident from occurring at your office holiday party:

  • Prior to the party, circulate a memo to reiterate your company’s policy against sexual and other forms of harassment. Remind employees in the memo that the policy applies to their conduct at company parties and other social events, and they should act in a professional manner at all times.
  • Set a tone of moderation by reminding employees of the company’s policy against the abuse of alcohol and zero tolerance with respect to the possession, use, or sale of illegal drugs.
  • Ensure your dress code prohibits any form of revealing or provocative attire, and remind employees that the policy applies at company-sponsored events.
  • If appropriate, allow employees to invite a spouse or their children to the party. Many employees might think twice about their actions if spouses and/or children are present.
  • Consider limiting the number of alcoholic drinks or the time during which alcohol will be served. In either case, stop serving alcohol well before the party ends.
  • Serve food at the party so employees are not consuming alcohol on an empty stomach and make sure there are plenty of non-alcoholic alternatives available.
  • Host the party at a restaurant or hire a caterer. Remind bartenders that they are not permitted to serve anyone who appears to be impaired or intoxicated and to notify a particular company representative if anyone appears to be impaired.
  • Remind managers to set a professional example, and designate several managers to be on the lookout for anyone who appears to be impaired or intoxicated.
  • Anticipate the need for alternative transportation and don’t allow employees who have been drinking heavily to drive home. If an employee appears to be heavily intoxicated, have a manager drive the employee home or ride with the employee in a cab to ensure he/she gets home safely.
  • Check your insurance policies to ensure they cover the company adequately, including any accidents or injuries that arise out of a company party or event.
  • Promptly investigate any complaints that are made after the party, and take any necessary remedial action for conduct that violates company policy.

Employers with questions or concerns about any of these issues or topics are encouraged to reach out to the authors, your Seyfarth attorney, or any member of the Workplace Safety and Health (OSHA/MSHA) Team or the Workplace Counseling & Solutions Team.

Source: Seyfarth Shaw, LLP

“Miller Fall Protection Safety Webinar” & “Fall Clearance Calculator App”

Miller Fall Protection Webinar

When working at height, it is important to know your fall clearance and swing fall, whether using a shock-absorbing lanyard or self-retracting lifeline. Calculating your fall clearance and swing fall is critical to your safety. The Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App gives workers who work at heights, the ability to quickly calculate the required fall clearance for Shock Absorbing Lanyards and Self-Retracting Lifelines, including swing fall.

Download the New Miller Fall Clearance Calculator App by Honeywell : Download link – https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/miller-fall-clearance-calculator/id971198656?mt=8

Miller Fall App

“Grain Bin Safety” – “Don’t Get Buried Alive….In An Instant”

Video From ABC TV Series “In An Instant”

Grain Bin Safety Week – 15 Tips to Keep You Safe

1.) Maintain grain quality (e.g. moisture, heat, etc)

2.) Never enter a bin without a “bin entry permit”

3.) Never enter a grain bin unless it is really truly necessary

4.) Never enter a grain bin alone – have an outside observer who can both see and hear you

5.) Most young teens do not have the experience, training or qualifications to help you.

6.) Time is of the essence – if you’re engulfed, it takes only 90 seconds for you to die

7.) The outside observer needs to have a sure quick method to contact emergency responders in an emergency

8.) Always lockout unloading equipment before entering (so they can’t be turned on by mistake)

9.) Always check oxygen (min 19.5%) and toxic/inflammable gas levels (phosphine CO2 dust etc) before entry

10.) Always, always use secure a lifeline (harness/rope/ladder) for everyone inside

11.) Ensure that there’s adequate lighting inside  People---Group-of-Firefighters Nationwide Agribusiness

12.) The lifesaving tip of last resort = cross your arms in front of your chest if you’re sinking – so that you can breathe

13.) Even during the most frantic times, never every risk your or anyone else’s life with a 5-minute shortcut

14.) Have a written plan for training and rescue

15.) The most important safety tip – train-and-practice often

Grain bin safety is such an important task that no one should take lightly. In addition to the tips above we want to share a fantastic contest with you that is going on now. Nominate your local fire department to win an invaluable grain bin rescue training and the rescue tube, brought to you by Nationwide Agribusiness.

Other great resources:

Learn more about our sponsor Nationwide Agribusiness on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4zOjiKXz6o – and their website.

Download the “Safe Grain Bin Entry” PowerPoint Presentation Below!

Safe Grain Bin Entry

“How Would Nick Saban Handle An OSHA Inspection?”

nick-saban-alabama

Lessons for Employers from the Crimson Tide’s Championship Football Coach

September has arrived. That can only mean one thing: it’s time for college football!

Labor Day weekend offered several high-profile games for our viewing pleasure. Number-one ranked Alabama won one of those contests, with the Crimson Tide overwhelming Southern California by the score of 52-6. Alabama looked well-prepared and disciplined in its lopsided victory over a ranked opponent, showing once again why its coach Nick Saban is likely the best in college football.

Coach Saban’s unprecedented success – having won five career national championships, including four out of the last seven – is the result of his unparalleled work ethic and a commitment to excellence even the CEO of a Fortune 500 company would envy. Indeed, his processes transfer well to the corporate world and some companies attempt to mimic what Saban has developed at Alabama. His attention to detail could create a successful environment at any business.

Employers can learn from Saban’s methodical determination to succeed. His model provides employers an example on how to, among many other things, institute programs to handle adversity and challenges that arise in the workplace.

Following Saban’s routine of working hard, staying focused, teaching discipline, and developing character could help any employer prepare for unexpected events like a workplace accident or visit by a government compliance agency, such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Given what we know about the habits that led to his success as a football coach, here’s how Saban – if employed as a safety supervisor – might handle the difficult tasks of developing a culture of workplace safety and responding to an OSHA inspection:

Pre-Game Preparation- Before OSHA Arrives

1. Be Prepared. No coach prepares like Nick Saban. Saban rarely loses a game for which he had additional time to prepare. In fact, he has never lost a national championship game, which generally does not take place until several weeks after the end of the regular season. Safety Supervisor Saban would have his company extremely prepared for any government agency visit, including an OSHA inspection. He would take the proactive approach of creating robust safety programs, rigorous training techniques, and a culture of accountability.He would not wait until after OSHA arrived to take these steps.

2. Challenge the (Safety) Program. Coach Saban loves for his team to play top-notch opponents, especially early in the season. Stiff competition challenges his team and only makes it better. He currently employs 21 consultants – in addition to his coaching staff – to analyze the quality of his program at Alabama. Safety Supervisor Saban would have consultants from top safety companies and safety professionals from competitor companies review his safety program and give feedback on how to make it better. He would listen to and learn from these consultants in an effort to develop new techniques and continuously improve safety in his workplace.

First Half – The Opening Conference with OSHA

3. Take Charge and Speak for the (Safety) Team. Coach Saban prohibits his assistant coaches from speaking to the media on behalf of the program. If you have a question about the Alabama football team, you ask Coach Saban. If OSHA arrived for an inspection, Safety Supervisor Saban would instruct his employees not to speak to any OSHA representative until he arrived. OSHA could only meet with the head of the safety program prior to beginning its inspection. This would ensure proper, and knowledgeable communication is delivered on behalf of the company.

4. Know the (OSHA) Rules. Coach Saban understands the rules of college football. In fact, he often questions why other coaches aren’t following them, or why certain rules should be changed. He is a student of the game. Safety Supervisor Saban would know not only the OSHA safety regulations but the procedures OSHA must follow when conducting an inspection. He would understand, for instance, that regardless of the reason OSHA appears at your door, if you consent to the inspection without limiting the review to the stated reason OSHA is there (e.g., hazard alleged in a complaint), most arguments relating to the scope of the inspection are lost. Saban would know what OSHA can and cannot do, and require the agency to follow its procedures.

Second Half – OSHA’s Walk-Through and Interviews

5. (Make OSHA) Focus on the Task at Hand. Coach Saban refuses to allow certain team personnel to speak on the headsets worn by coaches during the game. He believes any additional conversation is unnecessary and a waste of time. He also requires his players to focus on each individual play and attempt to execute it without error. Saban generally prohibits players and coaches from discussing the score at any point during the game. He believes that if you take care of each play, the score will take care of itself. While walking through his facility with OSHA during an inspection, Saban would require OSHA to focus solely on the reason why it is there. If OSHA is there for a complaint on a press machine, OSHA would inspect the press machine- nothing else. There would be no discussion of any other matters.

6. Tell the Truth and Don’t Make Excuses. Coach Saban doesn’t like excuses. Win or lose; he generally gives the other team credit for their excellent play; he doesn’t blame the referees.He also requires his players, to be honest. Saban believes honesty is a crucial character trait. Safety Supervisor Saban would require his employees, to tell the truth, if interviewed by OSHA. If there is a safety issue, he would instruct them to not hide it or make excuses. Honesty is the only policy.

Post-Game – After the Penalties

7. Learn from Mistakes. Saban doesn’t always win. When he loses, however, he allows that experience to be an opportunity to learn. Rarely does Saban lose to the same team twice in one season, or more than one year in a row. If Safety Supervisor Saban received a citation, he may contest it if plausible defenses existed. More importantly, however, he would learn from the experience and rigorously reassess and evaluate his safety program with respect to the alleged hazard in order to improve.

8. Above All, Be Professional. Coach Saban is a professional. He generally refrains from yelling or swearing on the sidelines, and treats others with respect in both victory and defeat. Safety Supervisor Saban would understand that employers and OSHA are on the same page from a mission standpoint. They want to keep employees safe. Being abrasive or unprofessional is not the demeanor that will help accomplish this goal. Saban would realize the importance of remaining cordial throughout the inspection process.

Coach Saban’s success is the product of habits that could produce results on and off the football field. Employers can learn from accomplished leaders like him.

When determining how to improve your safety program, consider what has led to success for others, even if that success occurred outside your industry. Think outside the box. This innovation and critical evaluation will lead to results.

By Travis Vance of Fisher Phillips

“National Preparedness Month 2016” – “Are You Ready?” #NatPrep

Don't Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.  

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

National Preparedness Month

September is recognized as National Preparedness Month (NPM) which serves as a reminder that we all must take action to prepare, now and throughout the year, for the types of emergencies that could affect us where we live, work, and also where we visit. Due to the success of last year’s theme, “Don’t Wait, Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today,” will be returning for this September with a continuing emphasis on preparedness for youth, older adults, and people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs.  Thank you for taking time help make America more prepared for emergencies.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHow To Use This Toolkit

The National Preparedness Month Social Media Toolkit has key marketing and preparedness messaging you can print or share on your social media channels to spread the word to colleagues, family and friends throughout the month of September and beyond! You can either copy these messages directly or customize them to reach your audience.

This section is Expanded. Click to Collapse2016 Weekly Themes

  • Promote NPM:  August 28-September 3                  Kickoff to National Preparedness Month
  • Week 2:  September 4-10                                            Preparing Family & Friends
  • Week 3:  September 11-17                                          Preparing Through Service
  • Week 4:  September 18-24                                          Individual Preparedness
  • Week 5:  September 25-30                                          Lead up to National PrepareAthon Day

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHashtags & Emoji’s

  • #NatlPrep
  • #YouthPrep
  • #PrepareAthon if you are conducting a preparedness exercise, tabletop discussion, or sharing a preparedness-in-action moment.
  • Feel free to add emoji’s (the little pictures on your mobile phone keyboard) to your social messages.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseGraphics, Logo, Videos, & Related Links

Check out tips and ideas to promote preparedness content. For more engaging content, attach graphics that are sized appropriately for specific social media posts (i.e. Twitter & Facebook).

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePromote NPM: August 28-September 3| Kickoff To National Preparedness Month

Social Media Content

This content can be used on various social media channels, and is less than 140 characters.

  • #NatlPrep Month starts 9/1. Promote the theme “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” Tools: www.ready.gov/september
  • National Preparedness Month starts September 1! Follow #NatlPrep for tips. More info: www.ready.gov/september
  • “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” Get started here: www.ready.gov/make-a-plan #NatlPrep
  • National Preparedness Month has a different theme every week. Details: www.ready.gov/september #NatlPrep
  • Share your plans for National Preparedness Month using the hashtag #NatlPrep
  • Get ready to go from awareness to action during National Preparedness Month. #NatlPrep
  • RT This: “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.” #NatlPrep
  • Creating your Family Emergency Communication Plan starts with one simple question “What if?” 1.usa.gov/1JwEwRG #NatlPrep
  • Does your family know what to do during a disaster? Start a plan today. #NatlPrep
  • You may not be with family when an emergency happens.  Create an emergency plan now: 1.usa.gov/1JwEwRG #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 2- September 4-10| Preparing Family & Friends

During this week you will know how to:

  • Contact family and friends before, during, and after an emergency.
  • Make a family emergency communication plan
  • Consider that your entire family may not be together during a disaster- make a plan of how you will reunite after an emergency.
  • Prepare for the unique needs of your family members, friends and neighbors.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

View in FEMA Multimedia Library

Social Media Content

Family Emergency Communication Plan

  • First week of #NatlPrep month is about getting all generations prepared. Anyone aged 2-102 should be ready for disasters!
  • Check out these tools to start your family emergency plan today: www.ready.gov/kids/make-a-plan #NatlPrep
  • Preparing the family for an emergency is as simple as a convo over dinner. Get started with tips fromwww.ready.gov #NatlPrep
  • What’s in your wallet? Part of our family emergency communication plan can be. Get the pocket-sized version: 1.usa.gov/1LPuV9o #NatlPrep
  • Tip: Keep important numbers written down in your wallet, not just on your phone: 1.usa.gov/1LPuV9o #NatlPrep
  • Take part in #PrepareAthon Day on 9/30 by participating in a preparedness discussion or training: 1.usa.gov/1S6oT4U #NatlPrep
  • Complete the actions in this #preparedness puzzle, you’ll be 10 steps closer to being prepared for an emergency: bit.ly/22tNNpV #NatlPrep
  • Download a group texting app so the entire family can keep in touch before, during & after an emergency. #NatlPrep

Youth Preparedness

  • Sending the kids off to school? Make sure they know what to do in case of an emergency. www.Ready.gov/kids#NatlPrep
  • Include your pet in your emergency preparedness plans. Info: www.ready.gov/pets #NatlPrep
  • Nearly 70M children are in school/childcare each workday. Make a family plan to know how to reunite during an emergency #NatlPrep
  • Kids bored? We can help. Check out our online Ready Kids build a kit game: http://go.usa.gov/5hS5 #NatlPrep
  • Ask your child’s school for a copy of their emergency plan for you to keep at home or work #NatlPrep
  • Fill out emergency contact numbers with your kids before they go #BackToSchool #NatlPrep

Caregivers/Older Adults

  • Caregivers, get all the resources you need in case of an emergency. Check out ready.gov for tips. #NatlPrep
  • Dads at work, Gram’s with friends, kids are at school when disaster strikes. How will you get in touch? Don’t Wait. Communicate. #NatlPrep
  • Make sure parents and grandparents know how to text/post messages for emergencies. #NatlPrep
  • Make sure your parents/grandparents have a *secure* digital copy of their insurance info. #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 3:  September 11-17|Preparing Through Service

During this week you will know how to:

  • Understand the importance of community preparedness.
  • Get involved with your community organization or plan with neighbors.
  • Highlight local preparedness efforts in your community.
  • Celebrate first responders.
  • Celebrate emergency-focused organizations who serve communities.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

National Day of Service & Remembrance

  • I will [fill in your service project] What will you do for your community on this National Day of Service & Remembrance? Tell us using #911Day
  • Do at least 1 good deed for your community on 9/11: http://bit.ly/29DymSw  #911Day
  • Thousands of people all around the nation will commit to a day of service on September 11. Be a part of it and share your experience! Using #911Day
  • How will you give back on National Day of Service & Remembrance? Snap It. Tag It. Post It. #911Day

Volunteer with an Organization

Help Your Community Get Prepared

  • Give a shout out to first responders and community service organizations that have made a difference in your community! #NatlPrep
  • Looking for an opportunity to serve your community? Start with steps found on @ServeDotGovhttp://bit.ly/2a3FAEr #NatlPrep
  • Emergency preparedness is a “whole community” effort. Get involved in your community today:http://bit.ly/2a3FAEr #NatlPrep
  • Your neighbor may have to rely on you during an emergency. Will you be ready:  http://bit.ly/29S1giS  #NatlPrep
  • #PrepareAthon can help your community discover activities to keep you and your neighbors safe:www.ready.gov/prepare  #NatlPrep
  • Visit our map to find resources & info on preparedness in your community:http://www.ready.gov/america/local/index.html #NatlPrep
  • At your next home owners association meeting share this community preparedness resource: http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Your neighbor may need you when an emergency hits. Plan with your neighbor today. http://1.usa.gov/1WVsAy7#NatlPrep
  • “Community preparedness is a shared responsibility.” Share this resource with your community:http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Did you know? FEMA has online trainings to help get your community prepared. Take them today:http://bit.ly/29VKBfU #NatlPrep
  • Almost half of Americans expect to rely on their neighbors after a disaster. Plan today: http://1.usa.gov/1QmIZGG#NatlPrep
  • We can’t do it without YOU! Increase your community’s preparedness by joining #PrepareAthonwww.ready.gov/prepare #NatlPrep

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 4:  September 18-24| Individual Preparedness

During this week you will know how to:

  • Understand actions you can take to be prepared for emergency
  • Be aware of specific needs you may have if an emergency strikes like: medication, power needs, eye classes, devices that you may count on, pet needs, etc.
  • Understand safety tips and protective actions you can take before or during a disaster.
  • Download the FEMA app for disaster resources, weather alerts, and safety tips

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

General

  • Be informed, make a plan, build a kit, get involved. Everyone can take steps to prepare for an emergency:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcnCQ_pdVCY #NatlPrep
  • Make disaster preparedness a part of your everyday routine and protect yourself and your loved ones:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcnCQ_pdVCY #NatlPrep
  • Being prepared is part of who you are, and disaster preparation is no different: www.ready.gov/myplan #NatlPrep
  • Take meds? Plan ahead by keeping a copy of your Rx + 1 week supply in a safe place. #NatlPrep
  • Keep a radio & extra batteries handy to listen for info from local officials if you lose power. #NatlPrep
  • Gather your supplies before a hurricane so you won’t find yourself with empty shelves. Supply list:www.ready.gov/kit. #NatlPrep
  • If you rely on public transportation, contact your local emergency management agency about evac info ahead of a hurricane. #NatlPrep
  • Sign up to receive text or e-mail alerts about emergencies like wildfire from your local Office of Emergency Management. #NatlPrep
  • Are you getting your community prepared for a #tornado #hurricane or #wildfire? Add your activity:www.ready.gov/prepare  #NatlPrep
  • Wireless Emergency Alerts can save lives! Be smart. Know your alerts and warnings. Learn more: 1.usa.gov/1jLKAGr #NatlPrep
  • Make sure you know what your insurance policy covers before an emergency: 1.usa.gov/1UGuFAA #NatlPrep
  • There are plenty of ways individuals can get prepared. Here’s 10 ways: bit.ly/22tNNpV #NatlPrep

FEMA App

Safety tips during a disaster

  • Know what to do when roads are flooded: “Turn Around Don’t Drown®! It may save your life!” #NatlPrep
  • If you’re already on “high ground” during a flood, stay where you are. Be prepared by having your supplies already stored. #NatlPrep
  • Wildfires often begin unnoticed. Call 911 if you see a #wildfire! More tips: http://go.usa.gov/3AqSx #NatlPrep
  • You may have to evacuate quickly due to a #hurricane. Learn your evacuation routes & identify where you will stay. #NatlPrep
  • An emergency may knock out power. Prepare by stocking non-perishable food items & water. #NatlPrep
  • During an #earthquake DROP, COVER, & HOLD ON. Share this safety message from @TheRock:https://youtu.be/vRdTaLWrpTE #NatlPrep
  • Know your community’s local #hurricane evacuation plan and identify several evacuation routes for your location. #NatlPrep
  • Don’t risk your family’s safety; follow the instructions of local officials – and if told to evacuate, evacuate! #HurricaneStrong

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseWeek 5:  September 25-30| Lead Up To National Day Of Action

During this week you will learn how to:

  • Participate in National PrepareAthon! Day on September 30.
  • Add your preparedness activity to www.ready.gov/prepare.
  • Encourage others to do a preparedness activity and register it on www.ready.gov/prepare.
  • Share images of you and your community doing a preparedness activity.
  • Share stories of how being prepared made a difference using #PrepareAthon.

Graphics, Videos, & Related links

Social Media Content

Be Counted: Add Your Preparedness Activity

  • Be Counted: Add your emergency preparedness activities to the America’s PrepareAthon! website:www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Join millions of Americans taking action for #PrepareAthon by adding your preparedness activities today:www.ready.gov/prepare
  • How many of the 10 #PrepareAthon activities have you completed? Be sure to register your actions:www.ready.gov/prepare
  • Ready, Set, Go! Register your  preparedness activities now: www.ready.gov/prepare
  • There’s no time like the present to register your preparedness activities: www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon

Take Action: Join Others to do a Preparedness Activity

  • America’s #PrepareAthon has 10 ways to participate. Choose your activity: www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Get the scoop on 10 things you can do to get prepared for an emergency here: http://bit.ly/29Kjc0Q#PrepareAthon
  • Be a part of the millions taking action and getting prepared for emergencies. Join us: www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • Join a nationwide emergency preparedness movement and prepare for disasters in your area:www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon
  • As part of America’s #PrepareAthon, we are committed to getting prepared for emergencies. Are you?www.ready.gov/prepare #PrepareAthon
  • Help spread the word about #PrepareAthon w/ these promotional materials and toolkits: http://bit.ly/1ROi609
  • National #PrepareAthon Day is Sept. 30. What are you doing to prepare?
  • Assembling emergency supplies is one way to participate in America’s #PrepareAthon! Here are 9 more:http://1.usa.gov/1WgMKnH #PrepareAthon
  • Do you have the FEMA app? It’s preparedness at your fingertips. Download it today! http://1.usa.gov/1CRVzMB#PrepareAthon

Share It: Your Preparedness Story May Inspire Others

  • See how communities across the nation are preparing for #disasters! Visit the #PrepareAthon “stories” page:http://1.usa.gov/1Yb7xsk
  • Extra, extra read all about it! Communities everywhere are getting prepared for emergencies:http://1.usa.gov/1Yb7xsk #PrepareAthon
  • Use #PrepareAthon to share how you’re getting your community involved in preparedness.
  • How has preparing made a difference in your life and/or community?  Tell us your #PrepareAthon story!
  • A community in action tends to stay in action. Share your story about taking action for emergencies using #PrepareAthon.
  • Did preparing in advance help you during a disaster?  Share your experience with #PrepareAthon
  • Built an emergency kit? Created a family communications plan? Tell others what you did using #PrepareAthon.
  • I participated in America’s #PrepareAthon so my community can be prepared for emergencies.
  • Have you taken action? Tell others what you did to prepare for emergencies and how it made a difference using #PrepareAthon.
  • I participated in America’s #PrepareAthon so my community can be prepared for emergencies.
  • “It Started Like Any Other Day” Hear how a disaster changed the lives of these survivors: http://bit.ly/1nwuDXu#PrepareAthon

Take Part: It’s National PrepareAthon! Day

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseCongressional Co-Chairs

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePresidential Proclamation

“Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs & Employee Engagement In Safety”

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Abraham Maslow was an American psychologist who created the Hierarchy of Needs, a theory which argued that psychological health was dependent on the fulfilling of needs in order of priority. This theory put forward the idea that humans must have their basic needs met in order to pursue their own personal growth and development. The needs in Maslow’s theory are, in order:

  1. Survival – These are biological needs such as food, water, shelter, sleep.
  2. Safety – This need requires stability, security, order, law, and protection from elements.
  3. Belonging – This is a need for friendship, love, affection, and intimacy
  4. Importance – The need to achieve and master things, independence, and self-respect
  5. Self-Actualization – This is the need that requires people to fulfill their potential and what they believe they’re capable of.

These needs are the basis for human survival and growth. But look closer at them. They play a large part in employee engagement levels and how your employees are engaged and motivated within your company. Let’s break it down and see how this works:

  • Survival – We know this is a basic need. This includes the need to have a job, a salary that pays the bills, and a sense of financial independence.
  • Safety – When we have jobs, we need to know that they are secure. With the way the job market is nowadays, it’s hard for many to move past this second most basic need. It also causes individuals to need structure in the workplace, with a chain of command and a process for their duties so they feel confident that they’re doing their job correctly.
  • Belonging – People need to feel like they’re part of a team, that they are a part of something bigger. As employees, humans need to know their individual contributions are valued by the company. If your organizational is setup around team principles, then this sense of belonging and “camaraderie” should come almost naturally.
  • Importance – This need dovetails into the “belonging” need in the sense that individuals need to feel like they’re important to a team, projects, and the overall organization. This need is most prevalent inside of larger companies where the need to engage employees on a personal level becomes harder and harder for higher level management.
  • Self-Actualization – Most employees have some level of ambition and want to achieve more than where they’re currently positioned. Giving them opportunities for growth, learning, leadership and advancement gives them all of the tools they need to begin to self-actualize within your company’s walls. When they reach this point, and are taking full advantage of the tools made available to them, they inspire others along the way and create a ripple effect of employee engagement.

These needs are critical for the fulfillment of a satisfying professional life and career, so how can you provide this type of environment for your employees? The first two needs are fairly simplistic – pay your employees a livable wage and don’t make them feel as if their job is on the line all the time. Have a strong organizational structure that promotes teamwork and inclusion and you can begin to fill the third need. The fourth need, importance, is where things like employee recognition come into play so strongly.

When your employees perform well, let them know it. Recognize them publicly for their accomplishments and reward them for what they’ve done. The public recognition lets the employee know their performance is important and that it matters. Incentive programs also work well here because they give employees tangible rewards for their performance. When someone receives a reward, or is able to use something like reward points to redeem for the reward item of their choice, they emotionally connect that reward to their jobs and feel important and accomplished because of it.

Self-actualization is realized because when employees feel important and recognized, they feel like they can take on more ownership of their role, and more of a leadership role within their company. This kind of employee is incredibly beneficial to the health of employee engagement because their enthusiasm and attitude actually inspire others to want to perform on their level. It’s contagious, and it works with workplace safety too!

“No Injury, No Accident”……..Right??

Discover how near misses can add up to major accidents. “No Injury, No Accident?” dramatically shows employees how to recognize and prevent serious injuries or fatal accidents before they occur. Based on the pioneering work of W. H. Heinrich and his renowned “Heinrich Triangle,” the program demonstrates how the odds of a serious or fatal accident occurring emerges from a series of typical injury-fee accidents. “No Injury, No Accidents?” also shows employees the importance of reporting the accident, investigating how it happened, and eliminating the cause. It’s an essential message for every safety program.

Note: The first 23 seconds of this 18 Minute video are a little garbled.

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